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MTV: The Year the Industry Broke


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#1 scarymuppet

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 05:58 PM

Part 1 of 3: The Old Rules Don't Apply Anymore <embed src="http://www.mtv.com/player/embed/" width="290" height="259" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" FlashVars="CONFIG_URL=http://www.mtv.com/player/embed/configuration.jhtml%3fid%3D1576537%26vid%3D195934&allowFullScreen=true" allowFullScreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" base="."></embed> Not bad. Haven't seen a whole lot of objective stuff on what is a major issue in music right now, so nice to see.
BAN ME IF I TALK TO MONTANA

#2 vamos

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 06:15 PM

I love the eye-contact commercial

where do we gooo new?!!?


#3 r.i.p.

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 06:28 PM

I love the intro with brunette caesar-cut John Norris close up shots, which then cuts to 50 year old John Norris with Dennis The Menace blonde hair. He needs to either step away or dress his age.

#4 brainstorm

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 06:34 PM

... or maybe someone needs to discuss the thread topic.
"So?" - Dick Cheney

#5 r.i.p.

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 06:39 PM

... or maybe someone needs to discuss the thread topic.


Yeah, because a 3 minutes MTV doc really delved into the subject. All it did was say:

Hey, In Rainbows came out on the internet. Trent Reznor and Madonna left their labels. McCartney put out a record at Starbucks. The Eagles put out a record in Wal-Montana.


The model really works best with people who are massive, like the above, or complete newcomers. It's those middle range bands, like the Killers or Maroon 5, who want to become massive who'll still have to use the marketing resources of a major.

Also, once the novelty of Radiohead and The Eagles model wears off (um, basically the next time someone does it), it won't be such a big deal. Those worked best because they were first. The method of release got most of the initial press. As it becomes routine, it won't be New York Times front page news.

#6 Alright Still

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 06:39 PM

MTV doing a story on how music sucks? Mmmmmkay.

#7 Montana

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 06:41 PM

Did they do the real documentary? "How MTV destroyed music"
Every Sunday morning I wake up
I see you by your dresser doing your make-up
Fluttering a Chinese fan in a Knoxville fashion
All last night you tossed and turned
Your body was hotter than the night Richmond burned
You say you had a bad nightmare about tractor trailers crashing
- The Felice Brothers

#8 brainstorm

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 06:46 PM

... or maybe someone needs to discuss the thread topic.


Yeah, because a 3 minutes MTV doc really delved into the subject. All it did was say:

Hey, In Rainbows came out on the internet. Trent Reznor and Madonna left their labels. McCartney put out a record at Starbucks. The Eagles put out a record in Wal-Montana.


The model really works best with people who are massive, like the above, or complete newcomers. It's those middle range bands, like the Killers or Maroon 5, who want to become massive who'll still have to use the marketing resources of a major.

Also, once the novelty of Radiohead and The Eagles model wears off (um, basically the next time someone does it), it won't be such a big deal. Those worked best because they were first. The method of release got most of the initial press. As it becomes routine, it won't be New York Times front page news.


OMG, I'm so sorry... you're absolutely right - MUCH better for everyone to get their snark on.

Thans for correcting my errant thoughts, like the one I had where I thought we talked about music. Stupid, stupid me.
"So?" - Dick Cheney

#9 By-Tor

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 06:55 PM

Didn't Wilco "do it" before Radiohead, though?
American Military Casualties in Iraq Date Total In Combat American Deaths Since war began (3/19/03): 4253 3421 Since "Mission Accomplished" (5/1/03) (the list) 4114 3313 Since Capture of Saddam (12/13/03): 3792 3115 Since Handover (6/29/04): 3395 2798 Since Obama Inauguration (1/20/09): 24 16 The first number is just deaths; the second number is deaths in combat.

#10 theminimumcircus

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 07:02 PM

... or maybe someone needs to discuss the thread topic.


Yeah, because a 3 minutes MTV doc really delved into the subject. All it did was say:

Hey, In Rainbows came out on the internet. Trent Reznor and Madonna left their labels. McCartney put out a record at Starbucks. The Eagles put out a record in Wal-Montana.


The model really works best with people who are massive, like the above, or complete newcomers. It's those middle range bands, like the Killers or Maroon 5, who want to become massive who'll still have to use the marketing resources of a major.

Also, once the novelty of Radiohead and The Eagles model wears off (um, basically the next time someone does it), it won't be such a big deal. Those worked best because they were first. The method of release got most of the initial press. As it becomes routine, it won't be New York Times front page news.


OMG, I'm so sorry... you're absolutely right - MUCH better for everyone to get their snark on.

Thans for correcting my errant thoughts, like the one I had where I thought we talked about music. Stupid, stupid me.


Snark?

I don't know; I got more out of this guy's post than I did the MTV blurb. Plus, he's doing what you asked: discussing the issue.
Wtf @ theminimuncircus retardly interjecting.

#11 r.i.p.

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 07:07 PM

Did they do the real documentary?

"How MTV destroyed music"


I don't see how this could be the case. It sounds just like an obvious, immediate "MTV sucks!" reaction. They popularized the music video. Yo! MTV Raps popularized hip-hop. 120 Minutes brought many of us, I would guess, our first tastes of the Pixies, the Stones Roses, New Order, Ministry, whatever. Ditto Headbangers ball. Everything else can be blamed on the teenage record buying public. When MTV got terrible, they gave up showing music. I don't see how "Music videos" ruined music. Surely a fan of Pink Floyd, who relied so much on multimedia [Yo, "The Wall"?] , would find it hard to argue that music videos "destroyed music."

#12 Paul

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 07:11 PM

I don't see how "Music videos" ruined music.


It meant that all the ugly artists Montana likes couldn't be successful anymore. [/revisionist rock critic]

#13 HandBanana

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 07:15 PM

Thread worth it for "WalMontana"
[color="#FF0000"][size=3]I made some rock posters.
For the world.
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#14 Duff.

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 07:16 PM

... or maybe someone needs to discuss the thread topic.


Yeah, because a 3 minutes MTV doc really delved into the subject. All it did was say:

Hey, In Rainbows came out on the internet. Trent Reznor and Madonna left their labels. McCartney put out a record at Starbucks. The Eagles put out a record in Wal-Montana.


The model really works best with people who are massive, like the above, or complete newcomers. It's those middle range bands, like the Killers or Maroon 5, who want to become massive who'll still have to use the marketing resources of a major.

Also, once the novelty of Radiohead and The Eagles model wears off (um, basically the next time someone does it), it won't be such a big deal. Those worked best because they were first. The method of release got most of the initial press. As it becomes routine, it won't be New York Times front page news.


OMG, I'm so sorry... you're absolutely right - MUCH better for everyone to get their snark on.

Thans for correcting my errant thoughts, like the one I had where I thought we talked about music. Stupid, stupid me.


Glass houses, yo. Wanna discuss the topic? Shut up and discuss.

No, it'll be stupid, and we're already doing something stupid.
murderfbanner.gif


#15 UselessRocker

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 07:18 PM

Thread worth it for "WalMontana"


Posted Image
"This Okkervil River song sounds like neutered indie rock"
"LETS GET SOME FUCKING ENERGY UP IN THIS BITCH MOTHERFUCKERS! You are not resigned to a fate of slow, painful death. The world is not as Radiohead and Portishead see it. "Oh the suffering! Oh the suffering, I feel the weight of the world and all it's pain" FUCK YOU......Be the grizzly, tear some shit up, rather than tearing yourself up." -- Montana, 12/21/08

#16 _____________

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 08:15 PM

...once the novelty of Radiohead and The Eagles model wears off...

how did the Eagles release their new one? i wasn't aware it wasn't a traditional release... do tell?

#17 HandBanana

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 08:33 PM

The Eagles packed their new cd in with cartons of Newports and 12 Packs of Natural Ice. Success was inevitable.
[color="#FF0000"][size=3]I made some rock posters.
For the world.
That give worms to ex-girlfriends: [url="http://www.gigposter...tp://www.gigpos

#18 b*derty

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 08:34 PM

every thread has so much anger right now. we should all go to nick's holiday thread and have some egg nog and relax

Posted Image


#19 HandBanana

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 08:35 PM

Yeah, everyone go watch the clip I put in that thread, you dead guinea homos from the 15th fuckin century!
[color="#FF0000"][size=3]I made some rock posters.
For the world.
That give worms to ex-girlfriends: [url="http://www.gigposter...tp://www.gigpos

#20 Sid Hartha

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Posted 20 December 2007 - 11:01 AM

David Byrne chimes in on this topic for Wired:


David Byrne's Survival Strategies for Emerging Artists and Megastars

By David Byrne Email 12.18.07 | 6:00 PM

Full disclosure: I used to own a record label. That label, Luaka Bop, still exists, though I'm no longer involved in running it. My last record came out through Nonesuch, a subsidiary of the Warner Music Group empire. I have also released music through indie labels like Thrill Jockey, and I have pressed up CDs and sold them on tour. I tour every few years, and I don't see it as simply a loss leader for CD sales. So I have seen this business from both sides. I've made money, and I've been ripped off. I've had creative freedom, and I've been pressured to make hits. I have dealt with diva behavior from crazy musicians, and I have seen genius records by wonderful artists get completely ignored. I love music. I always will. It saved my life, and I bet I'm not the only one who can say that.

What is called the music business today, however, is not the business of producing music. At some point it became the business of selling CDs in plastic cases, and that business will soon be over. But that's not bad news for music, and it's certainly not bad news for musicians. Indeed, with all the ways to reach an audience, there have never been more opportunities for artists...

full article:
http://www.wired.com...currentPage=all