Jump to content


Photo

Now Reading...


  • Please log in to reply
2388 replies to this topic

#2381 PopTodd

PopTodd

    Newbie

  • Sombie
  • PipPip
  • 470 posts

Posted 03 June 2013 - 04:17 PM

41%2BnvFPJmUL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-st


yes, i am in a band. i'll tell you about it sometime.


#2382 PopTodd

PopTodd

    Newbie

  • Sombie
  • PipPip
  • 470 posts

Posted 21 June 2013 - 08:05 AM

I Dreamed I Was a Very Clean Tramp by Richard Hell
image.jpg
Autobiography, written by somebody who actually knows how to write. Focuses a lot more on his writing career than his music career, at least for the first half of the book (which is all I am through right now). But Tom Verlaine does show up early on, as his best friend. It seems like the two of them raised a lot of hell together.

yes, i am in a band. i'll tell you about it sometime.


#2383 PopTodd

PopTodd

    Newbie

  • Sombie
  • PipPip
  • 470 posts

Posted 01 July 2013 - 07:05 AM

Just finished:
isbn9780575123717-detail.jpg
It has been a long time since I read any Ellison. Too long. While I would not describe this one as a "quick read"—it's too painful a story to classify as such—I could not put it down and I did get through it quickly. Nothing like anything else I've read from him. This is the story of the discovery of a new talent in the early days of rock 'n roll, and how his success corrupts the boy and everybody around him. Further cements, in my mind, the author as one of the very best of the 20th century.
Highly recommended.

yes, i am in a band. i'll tell you about it sometime.


#2384 The Luscious Phil

The Luscious Phil

    Hipster

  • Sombie
  • PipPipPip
  • 3601 posts

Posted 02 July 2013 - 04:35 PM

So, I just needed to get this off me chest but I finished A Dance With Dragons a few weeks back.

Honestly, how can a man write 900+ pages and not have anything happen.  It gets worse when you realize that A Feast For Crows is 800 some pages of almost nothing happening.  I honestly think the HBO show could cover both books in half a season.  


Posted Image

#2385 shave

shave

    Neophyte

  • Members
  • 5 posts

Posted 02 April 2014 - 07:50 AM

David Byrne - How Music Works

Interesting book, but it breaks down in the last couple of sections.  Starts out with his resume and Talking Heads experiences, and his growth as an artist.  Bridges more and more into technical areas of music, and how the music business works.  Less successful there-- I would have appreciated more connections Talking Heads work to describe technical nuance (possibly a samples page, like Alex Ross did with his book), and the music business section is a bit of a mess.  It's clear he wants to scream, "the music business is filled with fucking bastards", but he doesn't do that, which is a little disappointing.  I like a good rant.



#2386 shave

shave

    Neophyte

  • Members
  • 5 posts

Posted 09 April 2014 - 09:32 PM

The Generals, Thomas E. Ricks.  

Good so far-- the book's premise is about how the upper command structures in all branches of the US Military have been unwilling to demote or relieve officers that have reached the rank of General.  The book examines the failures in the command structure and military culture, which appears to have started just after the ink was drying on the peace treaty with Japan.  As a result, the CnC structures (Joint Chiefs, and various global commands) have been at odds with US foreign policy, and have produced some terrible results in recent conflicts.  



#2387 velocity

velocity

    Chanel No. ♪♫

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 10085 posts

Posted 28 April 2014 - 08:15 PM

My recent book club pick was Kate Atkinson's well-written Life After Life.   It's sort of like Ground Hog Day, with the protagonist somehow able to relive her entire life each time she dies. Unlike Bill Murray's character, however, she is not quite aware of her predicament.  It takes place primarily in England between 1909 and the 1960s, and does a particularly fine job of portraying a sense of place and day-to-day horrors of living in London during the Blitz.  



#2388 waveswithin

waveswithin

    Newbie

  • Sombie
  • PipPip
  • 697 posts

Posted 29 April 2014 - 10:45 AM

A biography of Lord Palmerston by Jasper Rudley, it is exhaustive and dry but gives a very good insight into the period and is well written, everything flows nicely and it is set out extremely well.

 

Also reading 'What They Teach You At Harvard Business School' by Philip Delves Broughton, quite an interesting book but not particularly insightful. It essentially just lays out the course structure and what you are taught, without really passing on any of the knowledge. Would have worked better if it was three times the size and actually attempted to teach some of the concepts. It is usually something like "Today we learned about applying traditional moral ethics to international finance" when I was hoping for "You can apply traditional moral ethics to international finance, here is how you do it".



#2389 caley

caley

    Hipster

  • Sombie
  • PipPipPip
  • 1577 posts

Posted 10 May 2014 - 01:12 AM

I was reading a book recently and it had the unusually-beautiful following passage

"We lived in a nice, middle-class neighbourhood with sixty poplar trees lining the street. At night, when there was even the slightest breeze, the trees would rustle in such a way that it put you right to sleep. Dad used to say that they were whispering to one another. I thought it was absolutely beautiful."
what makes it so "unusually-beautiful" is that it came from the biography of hockey blowhard and noted xenophobe Don Cherry.

"'I Love My Dad' is the only one that slightly annoys me, maybe because I never loved my dad."

-WavesWithin

Bob-s-Burgers-bobs-burgers-18293103-1280