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SOMB Top 250 Albums of '95 - '04


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#361 The Good Dr Bill

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 01:39 AM

BTE >>>>>>>>>>>>>> Pete Yorn and shame on you for suggesting otherwise
what does he file at the hall of records? a declaration of tortoise intent

#362 Ѡ҈҉Ѡ҈҉Ѡ҈҉Ѡ҈҉Ѡ҈҉Ѡ҈҉Ѡ҈҉Ѡ҈҉Ѡ҈҉Ѡ

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 01:40 AM

"aah-ee-aah-ee-ee-wha-ow" that is what BTE means to me, and it doesn't provoke me to dig any further
Aren't there any girls out their who like good music? I need to and want to meet them. My favorite bands are Overkill River, The Nife, Songs:Ohio, and Nuetral Milk Hotel. Please let me know if your into indy music and like to go to show's and drink beer's and makeout.

#363 The Good Dr Bill

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 01:43 AM

#193.

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The Jayhawks - Tomorrow the Green Grass


Year
: 1995

US Chart Position: #92

UK Chart Position: n/a

Charting Singles: n/a

Acclaimed Music Ranking: #34 (year), #275 (decade), #1422 (all-time)

AMG Says: "The Jayhawks' final record with singer/songwriter Mark Olson, Tomorrow the Green Grass is also the group's finest. While the band's earlier efforts perfected a more traditional brand of country-rock, their fourth record is marvelously eclectic, both musically and emotionally; never before had they rocked as hard as on "Real Light," dug as painfully deep as on "Two Hearts," or hit quite the same peaks of exuberance as on "Miss Williams' Guitar," a tribute to Olson's new wife, neo-folkie Victoria Williams. The addition of keyboardist Karen Grotberg brings rich new layers to the Jayhawks' sound, as does the inclusion of a string section on cuts like "Blue" and "I'd Run Away," a soaring pop song that's quite possibly the best thing the group ever recorded. A fitting legacy, indeed."

Ranked Highest By: jdubs3 (#26)

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what does he file at the hall of records? a declaration of tortoise intent

#364 Cinnamon P.

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 01:47 AM

this list is so fucking boring at this point. bleh, I hope my #1 doesnt end up back here in the shit pile.
Download this EP I made. The songs are pretty close to where they should be. I colaborated with Brian Wilson and Thom Yorke and then we all fucked in my basement apartment. Thom has a really big dick suprisingly, and Brian Wilson cried the whole time, yelling "These moans are not in perfect harmonic unison". Anyway, it sounds like what you would imagine something from that situation sounds like.



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#365 velocity

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 01:49 AM


AMG Says: "As the double-disc The Fragile unfurls, all of Nine Inch Nails' trademarks -- gargantuan, processed guitars, ominous electro rhythms, near-ambient keyboards, Trent Reznor's shredded vocals and tortured words -- are unveiled, all sounding pretty much how they did on The Downward Spiral. Upon closer inspection, there are new frills, yet these aren't apparent without digging -- and what's on the surface isn't necessarily inviting, either. There is nothing as rhythmic or catchy as "Closer," nothing as jarring as the piano chorus of "March of the Pigs," no ballad as naked as "Hurt." When Reznor does try for something immediate and visceral, he sounds recycled. Fortunately, The Fragile lives up to its title once the first disc is over. There are some detours into noisy bluster (some, like the Marilyn Manson dis "Starfuckers, Inc.," work quite well) but they're surrounded by long, evocative instrumental sections that highlight Reznor's gifts for arrangement. Whenever Reznor crafts delicate, alternately haunting and pretty soundscapes or interesting sonic juxtapositions, =The Fragile= is compelling. Since they provide a change of pace, the bursts of industrial noise assist the flow of the album, which never feels indulgent, even though it runs over 100 minutes. Still, The Fragile is ultimately a letdown. There's no denying that it's often gripping, offering odd and interesting variations on NIN themes, but that's the problem -- they're just variations, not progressions. Considering that it arrives five years after Spiral, that is a disappointment. It's easy to tell where the time went -- Reznor's music is immaculately crafted and arranged, with every note and nuance gliding into the next -- but he spent more time constructing surfaces than songs. Those surfaces can be enticing but since it's just surface, The Fragile winds up being vaguely unsatisfying."

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This review is all lies. And the first disc is way stronger than the second one (w/ "Starfuckers").

#366 The Good Dr Bill

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 01:52 AM

#192.

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Cat Power - You Are Free


Year
: 2003

US Chart Position: #105 / #2 Independent

UK Chart Position: n/a

Charting Singles: n/a

AMG Says: "You Are Free arrives nearly five years from her last album of original material, and everything, yet nothing, has changed about Chan Marshall's music. The album's title is as much a statement as it is a challenge, a command to free one's self from the hurt and pain of the past, or to at least find a way of making peace with it. Marshall seems to do both on You Are Free, a collection of songs about finding freedom and peace wherever she can. Initially, the album seems more diffuse than Moon Pix, as it spans tense rockers, blues, folk, and singer/songwritery piano ballads, but it gradually reveals itself as Marshall's most mature and thematically focused work yet. You Are Free opens with a stunning trio of songs that encompass most of the moods and sounds she explores later in the album. On "I Don't Blame You," the first of You Are Free's many spare, piano-driven moments, Marshall paints a portrait of a tormented musician, her voice so full of sympathy that she may well be singing a reconciliation to a previous incarnation of herself. The brisk, buzzing intensity of "Free," however, offers liberation in the form of rock & roll's immediate, poetic nonsense: "Don't be in love with the autograph/Just be in love when you love that song all night long." You Are Free's first two songs address musicians and making music directly; Marshall is a famously willful, volatile artist, and the increasing gaps between her albums (not to mention her unpredictable live performances) suggest that being a musician isn't the easiest thing for her to do, even if it's a necessary one. She addresses the struggle to do the right, but difficult, thing on "Good Woman," a near-spiritual breakup song where, backed by a children's choir and fiddles, Marshall explains that she needs to be a good woman with -- or more likely, without -- her bad man. Aside from being a lovely song, it's also a departure; earlier in her career the song might have just focused on the conflict instead of Marshall's gently strong resolution to it. This gentle but resolute strength runs through most of You Are Free's best moments, such as "He War" and especially "Names," a terrifyingly matter-of-fact recollection of child abuse and lost friends that says more in its resigned sorrow than a histrionic tirade would. As the album progresses, it moves toward the spare, affecting ballads that give her later work a strange timelessness; listening to You Are Free gives the impression of stripping away layers to get to the essence of Marshall's music. In some ways, the quiet last half of this album is more demanding than the angsty noise of Dear Sir or Myra Lee, but hearing her find continually creative interpretations of minor keys, plaintive pianos, and folky guitars is well worth the attention it takes, whether it's the dead-of-night eroticism of her cover of Michael Hurley's "Werewolf," the pretty yet eerie longing of "Fool," or the prairie romance of "Half of You." Every Cat Power album takes at least a few listens to fully reveal itself; You Are Free may take awhile longer than expected to unfold, but once it does, its excellence is undeniable."

Ranked Highest By: Stphone (#20)

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what does he file at the hall of records? a declaration of tortoise intent

#367 Cinnamon P.

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 01:56 AM

everytime I say something shitty about the list, a good one ends up comming along. I didnt vote for this either but I found my list so all is good.
Download this EP I made. The songs are pretty close to where they should be. I colaborated with Brian Wilson and Thom Yorke and then we all fucked in my basement apartment. Thom has a really big dick suprisingly, and Brian Wilson cried the whole time, yelling "These moans are not in perfect harmonic unison". Anyway, it sounds like what you would imagine something from that situation sounds like.



http://www.sendspace.com/file/j8689o

#368 Mitchell

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 01:58 AM

David Bowie must have some albums coming up soon.
Nice bowl of Crunchy Nut you got here, pretty expensive as I recall.

#369 haglofs-poof

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 02:36 AM

Did I actually sumbit a list for this? I can't find it in my 'search member's posts', but I vaguely remember someone commenting on my #1. It would help to have my list handy when following this countdown - I don't have it myself. (dreadful dreadful list so far)

#370 The Good Dr Bill

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 02:51 AM

#191.

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TV on the Radio - Desparate Youth, Bloodthirsty Babes


Year
: 2004

US Chart Position: #11 Independent

UK Chart Position: n/a

Charting Singles: n/a

Acclaimed Music Ranking: #14 (year), #68 (decade), #641 (all-time)

Rank on Our All-Time Albums List: #341

AMG Says: "TV on the Radio's Young Liars EP was a wonderful surprise, signaling the arrival of one of the most unique acts to seemingly come out of nowhere during the 2000s. Its alchemy of strange sonic bedfellows like post-punk and doo wop, and powerful vocals and experimental leanings, into songs that were challenging and accessible was no small feat; indeed, Young Liars was such an accomplished EP that it begged the question -- and ratcheted up the expectations -- of what TV on the Radio could do over the course of an entire album. The answer arrives with Desperate Youth, Blood Thirsty Babes, a deeper, darker, denser version of the band's already ambitious sound. Dave Sitek and Tunde Adepimbe push their abilities as sculptors of sounds and words to new limits. Adepimbe in particular continues to prove himself as a distinctive and captivating voice, both musically and lyrically. Desperate Youth, Blood Thirsty Babes' opening track, "The Wrong Way," is one of the best reflections of his strengths as a singer and writer, and of TV on the Radio's overall growth. Through the song, Adepimbe explores his feelings about being a black man and about black culture at large. Inwardly, he wavers between radical and placating thoughts and his feelings of obligation to be "Teachin' folks the score/About patience, understanding, agape babe/And sweet sweet amour." Around him, he sees mindless materialism, with bling "fallin' down just like rain," and misplaced anger and violence: "Hey, desperate youth! Oh bloodthirsty babes! Oh your guns are pointed the wrong way." On their own, the lyrics are strong enough to make a fairly impressive poem, but Adepimbe's massed, choir-like vocals and the flutes, throbbing fuzz bass, and martial beat that Sitek surrounds them with turn them into an even more impressive and impassioned song.

That TV on the Radio can handle an issue like race so creatively and eloquently shouldn't come as a surprise, considering how organically the group incorporates elements of soul, jazz, spirituals, and doo wop into the mostly lily-white world of indie/experimental rock. However, the song does offer a refreshing reminder that hip-hop and urban music -- as vital as they've been recently -- are not the only kinds of music that can handle this kind of dialogue. Desperate Youth, Blood Thirsty Babes is a political album on other levels, from the psychedelic soul-tinged antiwar meditation "Bomb Yourself" to the more subtle politics of relationships that many of the other songs cover. This also makes sense, considering that TV on the Radio formed partially in response to the apocalyptic feeling in New York after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. This brooding vibe, which also informed Young Liars, comes to the forefront on songs like "Don't Love You," "King Eternal," and the beautifully bleak "Dreams," which makes the end of a relationship sound like urban blight. But Desperate Youth, Blood Thirsty Babes also leaves room for hope, and finds it in connections with other people. "Ambulance" is a creative look at love that sets lyrics like "I will be your screech and crash if you will be my crutch and cast" to doo wop in a way that not only invokes nostalgia, but transcends it to sound utterly fresh. "Poppy" might be the only love song that rhymes "individuated" with "congratulations," but the track's ecstatic guitars do most of the talking; "Wear You Out"'s erotic grind closes the album on a surprisingly sexy note. Even though Young Liars was an accomplished EP, TV on the Radio have already progressed beyond it. "Staring at the Sun," the only song included on the EP and Desperate Youth, Blood Thirsty Babes, seems almost simplistic compared to the rest of the album's songs. While it's not perfect -- occasionally the album's heady, indulgent feel tends to make it drag -- Desperate Youth, Blood Thirsty Babes is still an impressive expansion of TV on the Radio's fascinating music."

SOMB Says: "TVotR’s follow up to their critically lauded debut EP was, perhaps, the most anticipated LP of 2004. Unfortunately, DY&BB received a fair amount of backlash upon it’s initial release due to the top heaviness of it’s CD track order (the vinyl release smartly spreads out the insta-hits “Dreams,” “Ambulance,” and “Staring at the Sun”). As the year progressed, however, listeners had time to sit with the album and it quickly became apparent that this release actually improved upon the group’s debut. Expanding their soulful post-punk sound to include elements of doo-wop, psychedelia, industrial and gospel, TVotR managed to release an album that was strikingly experimental yet comfortingly familiar at the same time. The highlight of the album comes during the 2nd half of both the CD and vinyl release with the Jefferson Airplane psych-jam-lament “Don’t Love You.” With statements like “sudden silence is the meanest way to moan” and swirling samples and loops floating in and out of the mix, the song creates a nihilistic feeling of despair that few artists could dream of achieving. Is this TVotR’s masterpiece? While it could be, I certainly hope not and look forward to seeing what they do next. Regardless, this album is the only 2004 release I’m certain I will still be revisiting on a regular basis 10 years from now." -I-C (#19 Album of 2004)

Ranked Highest By: Kilgore Trout (#9)

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#371 Montana

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 02:59 AM

#193.

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The Jayhawks - Tomorrow the Green Grass


Year
: 1995

US Chart Position: #92

UK Chart Position: n/a

Charting Singles: n/a

Acclaimed Music Ranking: #34 (year), #275 (decade), #1422 (all-time)

AMG Says: "The Jayhawks' final record with singer/songwriter Mark Olson, Tomorrow the Green Grass is also the group's finest. While the band's earlier efforts perfected a more traditional brand of country-rock, their fourth record is marvelously eclectic, both musically and emotionally; never before had they rocked as hard as on "Real Light," dug as painfully deep as on "Two Hearts," or hit quite the same peaks of exuberance as on "Miss Williams' Guitar," a tribute to Olson's new wife, neo-folkie Victoria Williams. The addition of keyboardist Karen Grotberg brings rich new layers to the Jayhawks' sound, as does the inclusion of a string section on cuts like "Blue" and "I'd Run Away," a soaring pop song that's quite possibly the best thing the group ever recorded. A fitting legacy, indeed."

Ranked Highest By: jdubs3 (#26)

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Wow, nice to see this place. Truly a classic piece of Americana.

#198.

Posted Image

Son Volt - Trace


Year
: 1995

US Chart Position: #166

UK Chart Position: n/a

Charting Singles: "Drown" (#25 Modern Rock / #10 Mainstream Rock US)

Acclaimed Music Ranking: #41 (year), #357 (decade), #1848 (all-time)

Ranked Highest By: Elcorazon (#7)

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Wow. Way too low. The hate for alt.country continues on SOMB.

#195.

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Pete Yorn - Music for the Morningafter


Year
: 2001

US Chart Position: #111

UK Chart Position: n/a

Charting Singles: "Life on a Chain" (#25 Adult Top 40 US), "For Nancy ('Cos It Already Is)" (#28 Modern Rock US), "Strange Condition" (#34 Adult Top 40 US)

Acclaimed Music Ranking: n/a

[

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Pete Yorn beats Trace?


mwahahahahahahha...
Every Sunday morning I wake up
I see you by your dresser doing your make-up
Fluttering a Chinese fan in a Knoxville fashion
All last night you tossed and turned
Your body was hotter than the night Richmond burned
You say you had a bad nightmare about tractor trailers crashing
- The Felice Brothers

#372 The Good Dr Bill

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 03:24 AM

#190.

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Bruce Springsteen - The Rising


Year
: 2002

US Chart Position: #1

UK Chart Position: #1 / #29 in '03

Charting Singles: "The Rising" (#52 / #16 Adult Top 40 US), "Lonesome Day" (#36 Adult Top 40 US, #39 UK)

Acclaimed Music Ranking: #28 (year), #167 (decade), #1331 (all-time)

AMG Says: ""Yes, life is very confusing, we're just trying to get on with it." -Art Carney as Harry Coomes in Harry and Tonto.

The many voices that come out of the ether on Bruce Springsteen's The Rising all seem to have two things in common: The first is that they are writing from the other side, from the day after September 11, 2001, the day when life began anew, more uncertain than ever before. The other commonality that these voices share is the determination that life, however fraught with tragedy and confusion, is precious and should be lived as such. This is a lot for a rock album by a popular artist to claim, but perhaps it's the only thing there is worth anything.

On this reunion with the E Street Band, Bruce Springsteen offers 15 meditations -- in grand rock & roll style -- on his own way of making sense of the senseless. The band is in fine form, though with Brendan O'Brien's uncanny production, they play with an urgency and rawness they've seldom shown. This may not have been the ideal occasion for a reunion after 15 years, but it's one they got, and they go for broke. The individual tracks offer various glimpses of loss, confusion, hope, faith, resolve, and a good will that can only be shown by those who have been tested by fire. The music and production is messy, greasy; a lot of the mixes bleed tracks onto one another, giving it a more homemade feel than any previous E Street Band outing. And yes, that's a very good thing.

The set opens with "Lonesome Day," a mid-tempo rocker with country-ish roots. Springsteen's protagonist admits to his or her shortcomings in caring for the now-absent beloved. But despite the grief and emptiness, there is a wisdom that emerges in questioning what remains: "Better ask questions before you shoot/Deceit and betrayal's bitter fruit/It's hard to swallow come time to pay/That taste on your tongue don't easily slip away/Let kingdom come/I'm gonna find my way/ Through this lonesome day." Brendan O'Brien's hurdy-gurdy cuts through the mix like a ghost, offering a view of an innocent past that has been forever canceled because it never was anyway; the instrument, like the glockenspiels that trim Bruce Springsteen's songs, offers not only texture, but a kind of formalist hint that possibilities don't always lie in the future.

In contrast, "Into the Fire" seems to be sung from the perspective of a deceased firefighter's remaining partner who, despite her/his unfathomable loss, offers a prayer of affirmation, and the request to embody the same qualities he or she displayed in paying the ultimate price for selflessness. A dobro and acoustic guitar bring in the ghost of a mountain melody, and Max Weinberg's muted snare and tom-tom rhythm offer the solemnity of the lyric before Roy Bittan and Danny Federici shift the gears and offer a nearly symphonic crescendo on the refrain: "May your strength bring us strength/may your faith give us faith/May your hope give us hope/May your love give us love." The second time through, the last line subtley changes to, "May your love bring us love." While the band is in full flower, the keys are muted under sonic ambience and the snaky lone acoustic guitar and Weinberg's thundering processional drumming.

Likewise, the revelatory rock & roll on "World's Apart," complete with a knife-edged wail of a guitar solo by Springsteen that soars around a Sufi choir (yes, Sufi choir) is not only a manner of adding exotica to the mix, but another way of saying that all cultures are in this together, and it unwittingly reveals that great rock can be made with virtually any combination of musicians. It's a true scorcher. "Further On (Up the Road)" is a straight-ahead rocker complete with knotty riffs and plenty of rootsed-out, greasy guitar overdrive -- most of the album does, but that's one of O'Brien's strengths as a producer -- that are evocative of Mike Ness and Social Distortion's late efforts.

Lest anyone mistakenly perceive this recording as a somber evocation of loss and despair, it should also be stated that this is very much an E Street Band recording. Clarence Clemons is everywhere, and the R&B swing and slip of the days of yore is in the house -- especially on "Waitin' for a Sunny Day," "Countin' On a Miracle," "Mary's Place" (with a full horn section), and the souled-out "Let's Be Friends (Skin to Skin)." These tracks echo the past with their loose good-time feel, but "echo" is the key word. Brendan O'Brien's guitar-accented production offers us an E Street Band coming out of the ether and stepping in to fill a void. The songs themselves are, without exception, rooted in loss, but flower with the possibility of moving into what comes next, with a hard-won swagger and busted-up grace. They offer balance and a shifting perspective, as well as a depth that is often deceptive.

The last of these is a bona fide love song, without which, in rock & roll anyway, no real social commentary is possible. The title track is one of Mr. Springsteen's greatest songs. It is an anthem, but not in the sense you usually reference in regard to his work. This anthem is an invitation to share everything, to accept everything, to move through everything individually and together. Power-chorded guitars and pianos entwine in the choruses with a choir, and Clemons wails on a part with a stinging solo. Here too, the chantlike chorus is nearly in symphonic contrast to the country-ish verse, but it hardly matters, as everything inside and outside the track gets swept into this "dream of life." The album closes with "Paradise," a haunting and haunted narrative offered from the point-of-view of a suicide bomber and a studio version of "My City of Ruins." These songs will no doubt confuse some as they stand in seemingly sharp contrast to one another, but in "My City of Ruins," all contradictions cease to matter. With acoustic pianos and subtley shimmering Memphis soul-style guitars that give way to a Hammond B-3 and a gospel choir, Springsteen sings without artifice "Rise Up." In this "churchlike" confessional of equanimity, Springsteen reaches out to embrace not only his listeners, but all of the protagonists in the aforementioned songs and their circles of families and friends. The album ends with an acknowledgement of grace and an exhortation to action.

With The Rising, Springsteen has found a way to be inclusive and instructive without giving up his particular vision as a songwriter, nor his considerable strength as a rock & roll artist. In fact, if anything, The Rising is one of the very best examples in recent history of how popular art can evoke a time period and all of its confusing and often contradictory notions, feelings, and impulses. There are tales of great suffering in The Rising to be sure, but there is joy, hope, and possibility, too. Above all, there is a celebration and reverence for everyday life. And if we need anything from rock & roll, it's that. It would be unfair to lay on Bruce Springsteen the responsibility of guiding people through the aftermath of a tragedy and getting on with the business of living, but rock & roll as impure, messy, and edifying as this, helps."

Ranked Highest By: Rob Gordon (#11)

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#373 Mitchell

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 03:46 AM

Hate for alt.country? It's on the list isn't it.
Nice bowl of Crunchy Nut you got here, pretty expensive as I recall.

#374 Montana

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 03:49 AM

Hate for alt.country? It's on the list isn't it.



Those two albums are considered the best of their genre. Trace should finish ahead of YHF.
Every Sunday morning I wake up
I see you by your dresser doing your make-up
Fluttering a Chinese fan in a Knoxville fashion
All last night you tossed and turned
Your body was hotter than the night Richmond burned
You say you had a bad nightmare about tractor trailers crashing
- The Felice Brothers

#375 wh1tep0ny

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 04:21 AM

Trace is far too low Wilco has the upper hand over-all but Tweedy will never top Trace imo any Richard Buckner fans?? Devotion + Doubt is amazing
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#376 throughsilver

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 05:18 AM

Send is the only comeback album I think I've ever heard that does not in any way feel like a comeback album. It's barely even in dialogue with any of the previous Wire releases.

Jane Doe is queen of 'band breaking up and getting back together'. Hopefully this poll will bear that out ;)

This review is all lies. And the first disc is way stronger than the second one (w/ "Starfuckers").

I didn't read the review (they tend to suck), but yeah, I agree with you. If The Fragile was just disc 'Left', it would be a stone cold classic (and a mile better than anything else by NIN). 'Right' drags it down.

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#377 Rob Gordon

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    sha la la, man

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 06:04 AM

What do you people want this low. The list is getting better imo. Some roots music represented...cool. Jay Z, TV, Wire....jeez...What GDB starts the poll with a meh and you all are now predisposed to join in?
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#378 Elemeno P.T.

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 06:23 AM

Agreed. Cool list so far, though I am baffled by Pete Yorn.
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#379 Eskimo kisses

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 06:24 AM

Yeah, there's not a whole lot I like on the list so far but in a way it's good to get the samey p/fork consensus picks out of the way now because I knew they'd be on the list somewhere. Not getting my hopes up for Jane Doe appearing though it'd be nice (should have voted really), Songs for the deaf being there gives me hope of the vastly superior Rated R and S/T doing pretty well too.
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#380 Ѡ҈҉Ѡ҈҉Ѡ҈҉Ѡ҈҉Ѡ҈҉Ѡ҈҉Ѡ҈҉Ѡ҈҉Ѡ҈҉Ѡ

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 07:48 AM

Jane Doe was my #2 I think, as well as someone else's (throughsilver?). Probably not enough to make a difference though.
Aren't there any girls out their who like good music? I need to and want to meet them. My favorite bands are Overkill River, The Nife, Songs:Ohio, and Nuetral Milk Hotel. Please let me know if your into indy music and like to go to show's and drink beer's and makeout.