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#1 Tony

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 09:56 AM

KINGPORT, Tenn. Janette Carter, the last surviving member of The Carter Family mountain musicians, has died. She was 82. Carter was the daughter of A-P and Sara Carter. Her parents and his sister-in-law Maybelle formed a singing trio discovered in 1927 when talent scout Ralph Peer came through the Tennessee-Virginia border town of Bristol to record mountain music. When her brother Joe died last March, Janette Carter became the last surviving child of the original group's members. She had Parkinson's disease and other chronic illnesses. Following the death of her father in 1960, Carter dedicated her life to preserving not only the Carter Family music, but the folk and country music of Appalachia. One result of that effort was establishment of the Carter Family Fold in Hiltons, Virginia. In September, Carter was given the Bess Lomax Hawes award by the National Endowment for the Arts, which recognized her lifelong effort to preserve and perform Appalachian music.

#2 Guest_alternachick_*

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 10:37 AM

Hi Tony! Where's the Birthday Thread?

#3 Freddie Freelance

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 11:04 AM

Actor Anthony Franciosa dies at 77 :

By BOB THOMAS
Associated Press Writer


LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Anthony Franciosa, whose strong portrayals of moody, troubled characters made him a Hollywood star in the 1950s and '60s but whose combative behavior on movie sets hampered his career, has died, his publicist said Friday. He was 77.

Franciosa died Thursday at UCLA Medical Center after suffering a massive stroke, publicist Dick Guttman said. The actor's wife, Rita, and children were present. The Rev. Jesse Jackson, a longtime friend, visited the family later, Guttman said.

Franciosa was part of a new wave in the mid-20th century who revolutionized film acting with their introspective, intensely realistic approach to their roles. Most of them were schooled in the method acting of New York's Actors Studio. They included Marlon Brando, James Dean, Rod Steiger, Shelley Winters and Paul Newman.

Franciosa was once married to Winters, who died last weekend.

From his first important film role as the brother of a drug addict in "A Hatful of Rain," Franciosa became known for his portrayals of complicated young men. He received a 1956 Tony nomination for his performance in the role he created on Broadway, then an Oscar nod. In 1957, the actor appeared in three other films, "This Could Be the Night," "A Face in the Crowd" and "Wild Is the Wind."

Franciosa's career continued in high gear with such films as "The Long Hot Summer," "The Naked Maja" (as Goya), "The Story on Page One," "Period of Adjustment," "Rio Conchos" and "The Pleasure Seekers."

The actor's behavior on movie productions became the subject of Hollywood gossip. The stories alleged fiery disputes with directors, sulking in his dressing room, outbursts with other actors.

"I went out to Hollywood in the mid-1950s," he remarked in a 1996 interview, "and I would say I went there a little too early. It was an incredible amount of attention, and I wasn't quite mature enough psychologically and emotionally for it."

Franciosa's assertive attitude extended beyond movie stages; in 1957 he served 10 days in the Los Angeles County jail for slugging a press photographer. His reputation contributed to the downturn in Hollywood offers, and his career veered to European-made films and television.

His first TV series, "Valentine's Day," cast him as a swinging New York publishing executive involved in numerous romances. It lasted one season (1964-65).

In "The Name of the Game" (1968-71) Franciosa alternated with Gene Barry and Robert Stack as adventurous members of a Los Angeles publishing firm. In 1971 the producing company, Universal Pictures, fired him from the series, charging erratic behavior. He countered that the company had treated him badly and demanded that he take a pay cut.

The 1975 TV series "Matt Helm," with Franciosa as a wisecracking detective (a role Dean Martin played in feature films), was canceled after half a season.

He was born Anthony Papaleo on Oct. 25, 1928, in New York City. He was 1 when his father disappeared, and the boy grew up tough in Manhattan slums. "Getting in the first blow was something I learned in childhood," he once said.

After working in odd jobs and sometimes sleeping in flophouses, at 18 he attended an audition for actors at the YMCA and was chosen for two plays. He later studied at the Actors Studio and the New School for Social Research. Adopting his mother's maiden name, Franciosa, he began getting roles in television and the theater. "A Hatful of Rain" made him a star.

Besides Winters, Franciosa was married to writer Beatrice Bakalyar and real estate agent Judy Kanter, with whom he had a daughter, Nina. His lasting marriage was to Rita Thiel, a German fashion model. They had sons Christopher and Marco.

---

Associated Press Writer John Antczak contributed to this report.

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Should have stayed home and drank beer instead of going to work today.

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#4 Slackmo

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 09:11 PM

Wean the dead thread down to essentials. I somehow missed the December death of John Spencer, largely because i didn't want to weed through the morass of banjo players, neurosurgeons and poet laureates of Sri Lanka in this thread.
Someone Still Loves You Pants McJickson

#5 WesterMats

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Posted 23 January 2006 - 09:15 PM

Wean the dead thread down to essentials. I somehow missed the December death of John Spencer, largely because i didn't want to weed through the morass of banjo players, neurosurgeons and poet laureates of Sri Lanka in this thread.


The obscurati are what I like about this thread.
"I forgot my one line, so I just said what I felt"
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#6 Tony

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 01:52 PM

MADISON, Wis., Jan. 24 (UPI) -- African-American literature scholar, Nellie Y. McKay, who co-edited the "Norton Anthology of African American Literature," has died in Madison, Wis. McKay was chairwoman of the Afro-American studies department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and she lived in a large house near the campus until shortly before her death from cancer on Sunday, the Wisconsin State Journal reported Tuesday. In 1997, McKay and Harvard Professor Henry Louis Gates received accolades from The New York Times and scholarly journals for the "Norton Anthology of African American Literature," a 2,600-page canon of 200 years of African-American literature. Born to West Indian parents in New York City, McKay earned a master's degree and doctorate in English from Harvard. She had taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison since 1978. "When she came here there was not a single university that was paying any attention to black women's literature, Craig Werner, UW-Madison professor of Afro-American studies, told the State Journal. "Now, there isn't a single university that isn't." A memorial service was planned.

#7 rudayo

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 05:29 PM

wasn't she just fighting with her record label?

#8 Bhickman

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 05:30 PM

wasn't she just fighting with her record label?



:lol:
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#9 Tony

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 09:40 PM

SANTA MONICA - Actor Chris Penn died in Santa Monica. The brother of Sean Penn was 43.

#10 Tony

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 10:43 AM

The last surviving member of the Nicholas Brothers tap dancing duo has died. Fayard Nicholas died at his home in Burbank, California at the age of 91. His biographer Paula Broussard says Nicholas suffered a massive stroke last November. His brother Harold died in 2000. Fred Astaire once described the Nicholas brothers' performance in the film "Stormy Weather" as "the greatest dance number ever filmed." While giving the brothers a Kennedy Center Honor in 1991, Gregory Hines called them the world's first "stunt dancers." Fayard Nicholas told AP Radio News that night that what he loved most was to "dance and sing and be merry."

#11 mouthbreather

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 10:52 AM

SANTA MONICA - Actor Chris Penn died in Santa Monica. The brother of
Sean Penn was 43.

Nice guy Eddie is dead!
Joe is going to be pissed!

#12 Tony

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 11:45 AM

CARACAS, Venezuela -- Carlos Martinez, who played for seven seasons in Major League Baseball, died on Tuesday at his home in Venezuela at age 40, his wife said. Martinez, an infielder for the Chicago White Sox, Cleveland Indians and California Angels from 1988-93 and 1995, died at his home in the coastal state of Vargas, about 20 kilometers north of the capital Caracas, Evelyn de Martinez told reporters. She declined to specify the cause of death, although she said he had suffered for years from the same disease which forced him to retire from baseball in 1998. "He was hospitalized many times until last week, when they told me nothing else could be done," De Martinez said. "He wanted to spend his final days here at home with his family." "Cafe" Martinez, as he was affectionately known because of his penchant for Venezuelan coffee, began his professional career at age 18 in his home port city of La Guaira with Los Tiburones, and was signed that same year by the New York Yankees as an amateur free agent. He was traded in 1986 to the Chicago White Sox, for whom he made his major leagues debut two years later in the last month of the regular season as a third baseman. Undermined by injuries, he finished with a MLB career batting average of .258 with 25 home runs, and 161 RBI.

#13 zolacolby

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 10:00 AM

Fayard Nicholas: LOS ANGELES -- Fayard Nicholas, the elder half of the show-stopping Nicholas Brothers tap-dancing duo that thrilled audiences during the 1930s and beyond with their elegance and daring athleticism, has died. He was 91. Nicholas, who had been in failing health since suffering a stroke in November, died of pneumonia Tuesday at his home in the Toluca Lake area of Los Angeles, said Paula Broussard, a friend. The self-taught Nicholas Brothers -- Fayard and younger brother Harold -- tap-danced their way from vaudeville and Harlem's legendary Cotton Club to Broadway and Hollywood. Known for their airborne splits and acrobatics, the handsome and dapper duo are considered by many to be the greatest dance team ever to work in American movies. The great Russian ballet dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov once called them "the most amazing dancers I have ever seen in my life -- ever." When filmgoers saw the Nicholas Brothers' dazzling acrobatic routine in the 1940 movie musical "Down Argentine Way" (starring Don Ameche, Betty Grable and Carmen Miranda), they were known to applaud and stomp their feet until the projectionist rewound the film and played the dance sequence again. Fred Astaire considered the Nicholas Brothers' "Jumpin' Jive" dance sequence in the 1943, all-black musical "Stormy Weather" the greatest dance number ever filmed. The show-stopping performance, set in a large cabaret with the Cab Calloway band playing, has the brothers jumping onto tabletops and leaping off a grand piano onto the dance floor in complete splits. The highlight of their breath-taking, synchronous routine occurs when they leap over each other in complete splits while descending an oversized staircase. "That was one take, coming down those stairs (and) jumping over each other's heads," Nicholas told the Los Angeles Times in 1989. Fayard Nicholas was born in Mobile, Ala., in 1914; Harold arrived seven years later. Their musician parents played in vaudeville pit orchestras and Fayard learned to dance by watching the shows. "One day at the Standard Theater in Philadelphia," he told The Associated Press in 1999, "I looked onstage and I thought, 'They're having fun up there; I'd like to do something like that."' He copied what he saw, taught it to his brother and worked up a vaudeville act called the Nicholas Kids. In 1932, the two young performers made their film debuts in a short subject ("Pie, Pie Blackbird" with Eubie Blake) and the same year began singing and dancing at the Cotton Club. They caught the eye of Hollywood producer Samuel Goldwyn who hired them for their first major film musical, "Kid Millions" featuring Eddie Cantor (1934). "The Big Broadcast of 1936" followed. The Nicholas Brothers appeared on Broadway in "The Ziegfeld Follies of 1936" and in 1937 they worked with ballet choreographer George Balanchine in the Rodgers and Hart Broadway musical-comedy "Babes in Arms." In 1938, the Nicholas Brothers used their engagements at the Cotton Club to refine and update their style, and they took it back to Hollywood in a series of musical films made throughout the 1940s. Among those films are "Sun Valley Serenade" (1941) in which they memorably performed the number "Chattanooga Choo-Choo" with Dorothy Dandridge, whom Harold later married and divorced; "Orchestra Wives" (1942) and "The Pirate" (1948), which was highlighted by their acrobatic routine with Gene Kelly in the "Be a Clown" number. "We call our style of dancing classical tap," Nicholas explained in a 1991 Washington Post interview. "Some people think we're a flash act. But we're not. At the end of the act, we'd put those splits in, but we'd do them gracefully. You don't just hit, bam and jump up. We tried to make it look easy. It's not easy. But we tried to make it look that way -- come up and smile." After spending a year in the Army stateside during World War II, Fayard re-teamed with Harold. In 1946, Fayard had a featured role in the Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer Broadway musical "St. Louis Woman," in which Harold had the lead. They then embarked on a new series of international tours. In 1948, they gave a royal command performance for the king of England at the London Palladium. Later, they danced for nine different U.S. presidents. Nightclubs, tours and television appearances dominated their performing schedule for the next decade, along with a number of projects away from each other. With Harold working in Europe and Fayard in the U.S., the Nicholas Brothers did not perform as a team for seven years. The brothers reunited as a duo in 1964 for an appearance on "The Hollywood Palace" TV variety show. But they lived on opposite coasts after that, Broussard said, and when not performing together they performed separately. On his own, Fayard Nicholas took on a dramatic role in the 1970 movie "The Liberation of L.B. Jones" and won a Tony for his choreography for the Broadway revue "Black and Blue" (1989), which included a dance on stairs for three child tap dancers, one of whom was a young Savion Glover. Among a string of awards in their later years, the Nicholas Brothers in 1991 received Kennedy Center Honors and were honored at the Academy Awards. Broussard, who had been working with Fayard on a biography of the Nicholas Brothers in recent years, said he remained active after his brother's death in 2000, dancing at tap festivals and giving lecture-demonstrations -- that after having had both hips replaced due to arthritis. Fayard Nicholas' dance choreography and the brothers place in dance history were chronicled in the 2000 book "Brotherhood in Rhythm" by Constance Valis Hill. The Nicholas Brothers also were the subject of the documentary "We Sing and We Dance" (1997)and an episode of A&E's "Biography." The late tap dancer Gregory Hines said in the foreword to "Brotherhood in Rhythm" that if Hollywood ever wanted to make a movie of the Nicholas Brothers' lives, "the dance numbers would have to be computer-generated." Nicholas is survived by his third wife, Katherine Hopkins-Nicholas; his sister, Dorothy Nicholas Morrow; his sons, Tony and Paul; four grandchildren; and a great-granddaughter.
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#14 Tony

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 10:29 AM

Fayard Nicholas:

LOS ANGELES -- Fayard Nicholas, the elder half of the show-stopping Nicholas Brothers tap-dancing duo that thrilled audiences during the 1930s and beyond with their elegance and daring athleticism, has died. He was 91.


POSTED! :lol:

#15 Complain

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 12:05 PM

CARACAS, Venezuela -- Carlos Martinez, who played for seven seasons in Major League Baseball, died on Tuesday at his home in Venezuela at age 40, his wife said.


You left out the best part of his story!

Carlos Martinez is the guy who hit the home run that bounced off of Jose Canseco's head and into the seats!

All my life i wanted to be black.
Until i saw your picture, now i wanna be you.


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#16 Tony

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 04:58 PM

NEW YORK -- Former pro basketball forward Luther "Sally'' Green, who played for the New York Nets and the Philadelphia 76ers, has died from lung cancer. He was 59. Green died Wednesday at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, hospital spokeswoman Ellen Watson said Thursday. Green was a star at DeWitt Clinton High School, then went to Long Island University, where as a 6-foot, 6½-inch senior he was selected a University Division All-Star by the Metropolitan Basketball Writers Association in 1968. He was inducted into LIU's Hall of Fame in 2003. He played 85 regular-season games for the Nets over two seasons in the American Basketball Association 1969-71, scoring 381 points plus 32 more in seven playoff games. He had three points over five games with Philadelphia in the NBA in 1972-73. He also played for the Harlem Wizards from 1971-72 and in Argentina from 1978-82, according to his sister-in-law, Paula Clark Green. At DeWitt Clinton, he played with Nate Archibald, she said. He is survived by his wife, Perchelle Dunston Green; sons Omar and LaRon Green; daughter Teauna Upshaw; mother Lavinia Green; and brothers Michael Green and Jackie Ford.

#17 Tony

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 11:17 AM

BERLIN (Reuters) - Johannes Rau, a prominent figure in post-war German politics and the country's first head of state to address Israel's parliament in German, died on Friday. He was 75. Rau, who had been ill for some time following three operations in 2004, died at home in the presence of members of his family, his office said. "Germany has lost an exceptional personality," Chancellor Angela Merkel said. A Social Democrat (SPD), Rau served as Germany's eighth post-war president between 1999 and 2004. He used the largely ceremonial office to encourage Germans to take a more open approach to immigration and a more optimistic view of life. "Germans walk around looking as if they have too much gastric acid," Rau told reporters in 2003, shortly before his retirement. "I wish they'd relax more." He sparked controversy in 2000 by being the first German head of state since the Holocaust to address Israel's parliament in German, prompting some lawmakers to walk out. But Israeli President Moshe Katsav paid tribute to him on Friday. "Johannes Rau was a great friend of the state of Israel and the Jewish people," Katsav said in a statement. "During his tenure as president, Herr Rau contributed significantly to bilateral relations and was a great fighter against anti-Semitism and Holocaust denial." The son of a Protestant preacher, he made his name from 1978 to 1998 as the state premier of North Rhine-Westphalia, home to 18 million people, or nearly a quarter of the population. "We all remember well his life-long commitment to reconciliation, his feeling for what moved people in this country and, not least, his sense of humor," President Horst Koehler, Rau's successor, said in a statement. Merkel, Germany's first leader from the formerly communist east, said she had often spoken to Rau and appreciated his humanity and sense of humor. "He often traveled in the old East Germany and did everything in his power to help East German citizens through his contacts with the Protestant church," she said. News magazine Der Spiegel dubbed him Germany's "citizen king" because of his popularity with ordinary voters. This reputation took a dent in 1999, when it was revealed he and other top Social Democrats in North Rhine-Westphalia had taken advantage of aircraft put at their disposal by a state-owned bank to go on private trips. Rau also suffered some high profile political setbacks on the national stage, most notably when he failed to oust conservative chancellor Helmut Kohl in the 1987 general election. Rau also lost to conservative Roman Herzog in his first bid to become president in 1994. Rau married Christina Delius, a woman 25 years his junior, when he was 51. She was the granddaughter of his political mentor, Germany's third post-war President Gustav Heinemann. He is survived by his wife and three children.

#18 Tony

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 10:13 AM

R&B vocalist and songwriter Gene McFadden, best known for singing and co-writing the 1979 smash ``Ain't No Stoppin' Us Now,'' died Friday after a battle with cancer. He was 56. McFadden died at his home in the city's Mount Airy section around 3:45 a.m., his family said. He and John Whitehead formed a group called the Epsilons in their youth and toured with Otis Redding in the 1960s. They became a prominent songwriting and performing duo at Philadelphia International Records, the soul music powerhouse. ``Ain't No Stoppin' Us Now'' hit No. 1 on the R&B chart and No. 13 on the pop charts. The duo also wrote several hit songs performed by others, including ``Back Stabbers'' for the O'Jays and ``Wake Up Everybody'' for Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes. Whitehead was fatally shot in May 2004 while he was working on a vehicle in the city's West Oak Lane section. Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff co-founded Philadelphia International Records, the label that produced a string of hits in the 1960s and '70s. ``Their talent was indispensable and their music capabilities were uniquely flexible,'' the duo said in a statement Friday. ``As songwriters, we appreciated them for sharing our commitment to creating lyrics of motivation and strength for people around the globe to enjoy.'' McFadden is survived by his wife, Barbara, 57, two sons and two daughters. ``My dad was laid back and cool,'' said Casandra McFadden, one of his daughters. ``He was a really private man and really about his family.'' Casandra McFadden said her father had been suffering from liver and lung cancer since being diagnosed in October 2004. Funeral ser yards. Because of their rarity, collectors can pay tens of thousands of dollars for prized cycad specimens from far-flung places. Black-market thieves can make tens of thousands of dollars stealing and selling them. But not the King Sago, whose abundance in yards and on roadway medians all over Florida owes greatly to the fact that the hardy plant historically requires very little to maintain in the first place, even surviving storm surges and extreme temperatures. Some of its owners might not even know they have scale. If they do, few may be inclined to invest the substantial time, labor and cost necessary to beat it. An estimated 90 percent of cycads in Miami most of them King Sagos have been destroyed by scale. Within five years, estimates Lakeland nursery owner Tom Broome, the same could happen in Tampa and Orlando. ``The landscape maintenance people don't know how to treat it, so they think cutting off the bad leaves is the best thing to do,'' Broome said. ``Then they put the leaves on a truck, haul it away and spread it all over town.'' Researchers say scale affects only certain cycads like the Sagos, but its recent, rapid spread to native species of cycad in Guam (possibly from U.S. Sago exports) has raised alarm it could unbalance island biodiversity. ``That has much more of an ecological impact than destruction of some attractive, ornamental plants'' imported for U.S. landscaping, said Ron Cave, assistant professor at the University of Florida's Indian River Research and Education Center in Ft. Pierce. Several pesticides can help control scale, but they require multiple and thorough application, said Catharine Mannion, an assistant professor and extensions specialist in Homestead with the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. ``The tricky part is you have to do repeat applicat, because people can't be spraying these plants forever.'' It got so bad in Naples that the city decided to dig up all Sagos on public property, said Joe Boscaglia, superintendent for parks and parkways. ``It's kind of a losing battle. The treatment is not effective, and you can get some identifiable results,'' he said. ``But for the most part, it's a continuous maintenance nightmare not to mention the cost to continuously maintain and treat.'' Even Haynes, who makes his living caring for the plants, let his go. ``I had a couple in my yard, and it wasn't worth it. I removed them even before they died,'' he said. ``I didn't have time or money to continuously treat them.''

#19 birdistheword

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Posted 29 January 2006 - 01:50 AM

January 29, 2006 Arthur T. von Mehren, 83, Scholar of International Law, Is Dead By WOLFGANG SAXON Arthur T. von Mehren, a leading American scholar of international law at Harvard, died on Jan. 16 in Cambridge, Mass. He was 83. His death was announced by Harvard Law School, where he had a teaching career of more than 50 years. The cause was pneumonia, said his identical twin brother, Robert B. von Mehren. "He was a leading figure for many decades in comparative law and international conflicts of law and jurisdictions," said George A. Bermann, professor of law at Columbia University and a co-editor of the American Journal of Comparative Law, who called Professor von Mehren "the undisputed leader in these increasingly important fields." Professor von Mehren was named Story professor emeritus of law in 1991 but continued to work until just before his death. He was an authority on international jurisdiction, comparative law and international commercial arbitration. He studied law in three countries, taught it in nine, and published 10 books and hundreds of articles. Professor von Mehren formerly headed the United States delegation to the Hague Conference on Private International Law, a standing body that writes the procedures for such dealings. Last year, he witnessed the completion of an agreement on international jurisdiction and the effects of foreign judgments in civil and commercial matters. Arthur Taylor von Mehren was born in Albert Lea, Minn., and graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Harvard in 1942. He received his law degree from Harvard in 1945 and a doctorate in government a year later, when he was appointed an assistant professor at Harvard Law. Fluent in French and German, he spent the first three years of his career in Europe studying French, German and Swiss law. His study comparing United States and German civil procedures remained a standard for 50 years. He was an editor for many years of the American Journal of Comparative Law and founded the Joseph Story fellow program under which young German academics worked as his research assistant for a year. He was a member of the Advisory Committee on Private International Law at the State Department, and a founding member and past president of the American Society of Comparative Law. Besides his brother, a resident of Manhattan, Professor von Mehren is survived by his wife of 53 years, Joan Moore von Mehren; three sons, George M., of Cleveland, Peter A., of Philadelphia, and Philip T., of Bronxville, N.Y.; and several grandchildren.

#20 Tony

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Posted 30 January 2006 - 10:50 AM

Wendy Wasserstein, who celebrated women confronting feminism, careers, love and motherhood in such works as "The Heidi Chronicles'' and "The Sisters Rosensweig,'' died Monday, Lincoln Center Theater said. She was 55. Wasserstein, who had been battling cancer in recent months, died at Memorial Sloan Kettering hospital.