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#801 jen r

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Posted 29 May 2007 - 06:12 PM

http://www.huffingto...el_b_49681.html

Written by Jeff Tweedy's brother-in-law, includes a story about Reilly meeting Wilco in the studio.

#802 Tony

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 09:08 AM

Pianist and arranger George Greeley, who composed the theme for "My Favorite Martian," died of emphysema May 26 in Sherman Oaks, Calif. He was 89. A memorial service will be held on Friday, June 1 at 3 p.m. in the Faith Chapel at Forest Lawn Cemetery, 6300 Forest Lawn Dr., Los Angeles. Born in Westerly, R.I., Greeley served during WWII conducting the Air Force band and entertaining the troops. He attended Juilliard School of Music, and entered the music biz after meeting Sy Oliver, Duke Ellington's arranger. Oliver taught him the art of arranging for big bands and he joined the Tommy Dorsey band in Indianapolis, the same day Frank Sinatra became the band's new vocalist. His career as a performing artist, arranger and conductor was launched when he was signed by Warner Brothers Records for a series of 25 albums based on the popular piano concertos. Greeley collaborated on the background musical scores of hundreds of movies at Columbia Pictures, including "Picnic" and "The Eddy Duchin Story" (his hands were used when Tyrone Power sat at the piano in the movie). He was the composer for the film "Hellcats of the Navy" starring Ronald Reagan. In the 1960s, he segued into television when he created the background music and theme for "My Favorite Martian" starring Ray Walston and Bill Bixby. The Martian theme, punctuated by the sound of the theremin, a high-pitched instrument, established an immediate recognition of the show and created almost a cult following of Martian fans. He is survived by two sons; his long time companion, Teri York; a brother and a sister.

#803 Tony

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 09:58 AM

This obit doesn't make clear, perhaps out of embarrasment, that her most significant 'entertainment' role was playing Brenda in 'Friday the 13th'


Laurie Lee Bartram McCauley left this life to enjoy eternity in Heaven on May 25, 2007.

She was born May 16, 1958, in St. Louis, Mo., to Larry and Lee Bartram, the middle child between two brothers, Larry Jr. and his wife, Lisanne, of Clinton, N.J., and Lane and his wife, Jill, of Overland Park, Ks.

After a brief career in the entertainment field Laurie made the decision to enroll at Liberty Baptist College (now Liberty University). While attending Liberty she met the love of her life, her future husband, Gregory McCauley. They were married by the Reverend Jerry Falwell. The greatest love the two of them have shared, besides their faith in the Lord Jesus Christ, is rearing their five children, Lauren McCauley Barnes, Scott, Jordan, Francis, and Isabelle McCauley.

Laurie particularly enjoyed 15 years of homeschooling her children, participating in the arts, attendance at a wide variety of her children's activities, tending her garden with Greg, traveling, and serving the Body of Christ through Rivermont Evangelical Presbyterian Church, and Redeemer Presbyterian Church.

The "consummate nurturer," Laurie passionately cared for her friends, her neighbors, her dogs, and her pond. But first, her family. Laurie is survived by her husband, children, parents, mother-in-law, nieces, nephews, sisters-in-law, brothers-in-law and a legion of friends.
A memorial service will be conducted at 6 p.m. Tuesday, May 29, at Rivermont Evangelical Presbyterian Church, 2424 Rivermont Ave., Lynchburg.

The family suggests memorial donations to any of the following: Dance Theatre of Lynchburg; The Academy of Fine Arts; Home School Legal Defense Fund; Rivermont Evangelical Presbyterian Church Missions Committee; or Redeemer Presbyterian Church Missions Committee.
Diuguid Funeral Service, Wiggington Chapel, is in charge of arrangements.

#804 Freddie Freelance

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 11:36 AM

This obit doesn't make clear, perhaps out of embarrasment, that her most significant 'entertainment' role was playing Brenda in 'Friday the 13th'


Laurie Lee Bartram McCauley left this life to enjoy eternity in Heaven on May 25, 2007.

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Rev. Dr. Frederick J. Freelance, Ph.D., Th.D., D.F.S.
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Should have stayed home and drank beer instead of going to work today.

Now Playing: Brahms, Symphony No 2; Giulini - Wiener

Heh heh, he said "Wiener"...

#805 Tony

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Posted 31 May 2007 - 11:48 PM

Mark Harris, author of the acclaimed baseball novel Bang the Drum Slowly, which he adapted for the 1973 movie starring Michael Moriarty and Robert DeNiro, has died. He was 84. Harris, a retired Arizona State University professor of English who lived in Goleta, Calif., died of complications related to Alzheimer's disease Wednesday at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, said his son, Henry Harris. The author of 13 novels and five nonfiction books, Harris was best known for his four baseball novels narrated by Henry Wiggen, the ace left-handed pitcher for the fictional New York Mammoths: The Southpaw (1953), Bang the Drum Slowly (1956), A Ticket for a Seamstitch (1957) and It Looked Like For Ever (1979). Bang the Drum Slowly, named one of the top 100 sports books of all time by Sports Illustrated, was the most popular of the four. The tragicomic tale of Wiggen and catcher Bruce Pearson, who is dying of Hodgkin's disease, Bang the Drum Slowly was adapted for a live 1956 segment of The U.S. Steel Hour, starring Paul Newman as Wiggen and Albert Salmi as Pearson. In the movie version, Moriarty played Wiggin and DeNiro played Pearson. The novel also was adapted as a stage play.

#806 Tony

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Posted 04 June 2007 - 11:29 PM

Wyoming Sen. Craig Thomas, a three-term conservative Republican who stayed clear of the Washington limelight and political catfights, died Monday. He was 74. The senator's family issued a statement saying he died Monday evening at National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Md. He had been receiving chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. Just before the 2006 election, Thomas was hospitalized with pneumonia and had to cancel his last campaign stops. He nonetheless won with 70 percent of the vote, monitoring the election from his hospital bed. Two days after the election, Thomas announced that he had just been diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia.

#807 Tony

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Posted 05 June 2007 - 10:09 AM

Freddie Scott (April 24, 1933 - June 4, 2007 Providence, Rhode Island) was a solo artist who began his career as a songwriter for Columbia Records, along with Carole King and Gerry Goffin. Scott recorded the chart-topping hit "Hey, Girl" and went on to chart a string of other Billboard Hot 100 singles between 1963 and 1971. His 1968 effort "You Got What I Need" was sampled for the 1989 Biz Markie hit, "Just a Friend". Scott later hit the oldies circuit, and then released two new albums in the 1990s, one in 2001, and one in 2004 which includes some backing vocals by Greg Bravo (Gary Scott). He also was a contributor to Van Morrison's "Vanthology" album released in 2003.

#808 Tony

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 09:52 AM

Richard Rorty, 1931-2007 by Telos Press Richard Rorty, the leading American philosopher and heir to the pragmatist tradition, passed away on Friday, June 8. He was Professor of Comparative Literature emeritus at Stanford University. In April the American Philosophical Society awarded him the Thomas Jefferson Medal. The prize citation reads: "In recognition of his influential and distinctively American contribution to philosophy and, more widely, to humanistic studies. His work redefined knowledge 'as a matter of conversation and of social practice, rather than as an attempt to mirror nature' and thus redefined philosophy itself as an unending, democratically disciplined, social and cultural activity of inquiry, reflection, and exchange, rather than an activity governed and validated by the concept of objective, extramental truth." At the awards ceremony, presenter Lionel Gossman celebrated Dr. Rorty as an advocate of "a deeply liberal, democratic, and truly American way of thinking about knowledge." Dr. Rorty's published works include Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature (1979), Consequences of Pragmatism (1982), Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity (1988), Objectivity, Relativism and Truth: Philosophical Papers I (1991), Essays on Heidegger and Others: Philosophical Papers II (1991), Achieving Our Country: Leftist Thought in Twentieth Century America (1998), Truth and Progress: Philosophical Papers III (1998), and Philosophy and Social Hope (2000).

#809 Tony

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Posted 12 June 2007 - 03:50 PM

Getting word that Don Herbert may have died today. He was Mr. Wizard.

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Posted 12 June 2007 - 03:52 PM

That'd suck royally. Big intro into the world of science that guy was.

#811 Tony

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Posted 12 June 2007 - 03:57 PM

From his site... is with deep sadness that we regret to inform you of the passing of Don Herbert - the one and only "Mr. Wizard". Don lost his battle with cancer today, June 12, 2007, at 9 AM - slightly more than one month shy of his 90th birthday. He was lovingly surrounded by his family, who are at once, saddened by his passing, and relieved that he is no longer suffering. We all feel lucky to have known and worked with Don and we have been honored to carry on his legacy as an original and truly legendary figure in the worlds of both Television and Science Education. He has been inspirational and influential in so many ways and on so many lives and we are comforted in the fact that his ground breaking work and legacy will continue to inspire many more people for years to come. Thank you so much to all of you for your support and sympathy. Sincerely, The Family

#812 Freddie Freelance

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Posted 12 June 2007 - 04:08 PM

I feel like having Cheese Fries...

June 7, 2007, 9:15PM
Edwin Traisman, 91, helped create Cheez Whiz

Associated Press

MADISON, Wis. Edwin Traisman, a food scientist who created the process for freezing McDonald's french fries and helped develop Cheez Whiz, has died at age 91.

Traisman died Tuesday at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics after a heart attack, said his granddaughter Jenna Greene, of Chevy Chase, Md.

Born in Chicago on Nov. 25, 1915, to Latvian immigrants, Traisman was the only one of six siblings to graduate from high school. He earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry from the University of Illinois in 1937.

Traisman worked for Kraft Foods on the teams that created Cheez Whiz and individually packaged cheese slices in the 1950s. He became a division director of food research with responsibility for cheese and related projects.

Then Traisman wandered into a McDonald's restaurant near Chicago to ask about opening a franchise, said his wife of 44 years, Dorothy. He approached a man who was sweeping and asked for the manager. The man said the manager wasn't in, but he might be able to help.

"It turned out it was Mr. Ray Kroc himself," Dorothy Traisman said.

The two became friends, and Traisman opened the first McDonald's franchise in the Madison area in 1957. Within 14 years, he owned five restaurants.

One problem McDonald's Corp. had was producing french fries when Idaho potatoes were not in season, Greene said. Freezing uncooked potatoes ruined their texture. Traisman eventually developed and patented a process for partially cooking the fries and then freezing them.

"Then they could stay fresh and crispy," Greene said. "I think the secret was in how long you cook them before you freeze them."

He also broke ground by hiring women, violating the fast-food company's rules, his wife said.

"It almost caused him to lose the franchise," Dorothy Traisman said. "It was quite innovative."

Traisman sold his restaurants in the 1970s.

Desiring a return to research, he went as a program manager at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Food Research Institute in 1970. In 1987, he helped initiate research on E. coli, which was then a little-known pathogen, according to a university news release. He later was inducted into the Wisconsin Meat Industry Hall of Fame.

Traisman officially retired from the institute in 1988 but continued to edit its newsletter until his death.

"He was a marvelous guy with a marvelous legacy," director Michael Pariza said.

Traisman, who lived in Monona, had five children.


Rev. Dr. Frederick J. Freelance, Ph.D., Th.D., D.F.S.
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Should have stayed home and drank beer instead of going to work today.

Now Playing: Brahms, Symphony No 2; Giulini - Wiener

Heh heh, he said "Wiener"...

#813 Tony

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Posted 13 June 2007 - 02:40 PM

Billy Graham's wife Ruth is apparently near death.

#814 ParticleHustler

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Posted 13 June 2007 - 03:59 PM

This is probably ridiculous to most of you, but I'd like to add the passing of our dog Noelle yesterday to this thread. She was 15 and had been suffering from a variety of ailments, including diabetes and Cushing's Disease, and yesterday her blood sugar level dropped severely and couldn't be brought back to normal. My wife got her about 4 months after we started dating, so it will be strange not having her around.

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Posted 13 June 2007 - 04:12 PM

Not ridiculous at all, PH. Sorry for your loss.

#816 nobodies

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Posted 13 June 2007 - 04:39 PM

This is probably ridiculous to most of you, but I'd like to add the passing of our dog Noelle yesterday to this thread. She was 15 and had been suffering from a variety of ailments, including diabetes and Cushing's Disease, and yesterday her blood sugar level dropped severely and couldn't be brought back to normal. My wife got her about 4 months after we started dating, so it will be strange not having her around.


That's sadder than just about every d-level celebrity death that occupies this thread. I lost a dog about a year and a half ago, but she was only 6 months old. We have a new dog now who we love, but we still miss the ones who passed. Not that it's much of a consolation, but 15 years is way old for a dog, so I'm sure she had a good life. Anyway, sorry about your dog.

#817 velocity

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Posted 13 June 2007 - 11:57 PM

Aw, I'm sorry about your dog, C.

#818 undo

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 12:06 AM

What kind of dog was she?

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 08:27 AM

x-U.N. chief Waldheim dies
One-time secretary-general dies at age 88, according to Austrian media
BREAKING NEWS
The Associated Press
Updated: 7:54 a.m. CT June 14, 2007

VIENNA, Austria - Former U.N. Secretary-General Kurt Waldheim, who was elected Austrian president despite an international scandal about his secretive World War II military service, died Thursday, Austrian media reported. He was 88.

Waldheim, who was hospitalized in Vienna late last month with a fever-causing infection, died of heart failure, state broadcaster ORF reported, citing his family.

Waldheim's tenure as U.N. chief from 1972-82 and his election as president in 1986 were overshadowed by revelations that he belonged to a German army unit that committed atrocities in the Balkans during World War II.

Please check back for more on this developing story.

2007 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

URL: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19223728/



#820 Tony

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 05:34 PM

Billy Graham's wife Ruth is apparently near death.


I was right! :lol:


Ruth Graham, who surrendered dreams of missionary work in Tibet to marry a suitor who became the world's most renowned evangelist, died Thursday. She was 87. Graham died at 5:05 p.m. at her home at Little Piney Cove, surrounded by her husband and all five of their children, said a statement released by Larry Ross, Billy Graham's spokesman.

"Ruth was my life partner, and we were called by God as a team," Billy Graham said in a statement. "No one else could have borne the load that she carried. She was a vital and integral part of our ministry, and my work through the years would have been impossible without her encouragement and support.

"I am so grateful to the Lord that He gave me Ruth, and especially for these last few years we've had in the mountains together. We've rekindled the romance of our youth, and my love for her continued to grow deeper every day. I will miss her terribly, and look forward even more to the day I can join her in Heaven."