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#1101 Tony

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Posted 21 January 2008 - 09:47 PM

Slim Whitman, the falsetto singer and yodeler best known for his 1952 smash, "Indian Love Call," has died. He turned 84 yesterday. A native of Tampa, Fla., Whitman played a key early role in popularizing country music overseas. He specialized in sentimental or "heart" songs like "Secret Love" and "Love Call," the latter previously recorded by Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy in 1036. A perennial on the charts during his 20-year association with Imperial Records, which later became a part of United Artists, Whitman was a regular on the Louisiana Hayride during the early 1950s and, later, on the Grand Ole Opry.

#1102 Tony

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Posted 22 January 2008 - 04:43 PM

SACRAMENTO - Kenneth Eugene Parnell, one of California's most notorious child molesters, has died of natural causes while serving a life sentence. Parnell, 76, died at the California Medical Facility in Vacaville on Monday, corrections officials said today. He was convicted of kidnapping 7-year-old Steven Stayner in 1972 and keeping him until 1980. That's when Parnell abducted a second boy and Stayner fled, taking the boy with him. Stayner's story was told in the television movie "I Know My First Name is Steven." He died in a motorcycle accident in 1989. Stayner's brother, Cary, is awaiting execution for killing four women in Yosemite National Park in 1999. Parnell was paroled after serving prison time for the earlier kidnappings. In 2004, he was sentenced to 25 years to life after he attempted to abduct another child. Prosecutors said he asked the sister of his former caretaker to deliver a 4-year-old boy to his Berkeley apartment in exchange for $500. The woman went to police instead.

#1103 Tony

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Posted 22 January 2008 - 04:52 PM

Heath Ledger is dead.

#1104 Nick

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Posted 22 January 2008 - 04:56 PM

Holy shit

#1105 Tony

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Posted 22 January 2008 - 05:05 PM

Posted Image

#1106 Tony

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 02:17 PM

Slim Whitman, the falsetto singer and yodeler best known for his 1952 smash, "Indian Love Call," has died. He turned 84 yesterday. A native of Tampa, Fla., Whitman played a key early role in popularizing country music overseas. He specialized in sentimental or "heart" songs like "Secret Love" and "Love Call," the latter previously recorded by Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy in 1036. A perennial on the charts during his 20-year association with Imperial Records, which later became a part of United Artists, Whitman was a regular on the Louisiana Hayride during the early 1950s and, later, on the Grand Ole Opry.



Slim Whitman still singing ...
By DANA TREEN
The Times-Union

Rumors that country crooner Slim Whitman died Sunday on his 84th birthday are, as they say, “greatly exaggerated.”

Online and mainstream media reports that the famous Middleburg resident had died are wrong, he told the Times-Union today.

“I can still sing,” he said. “If you are dead, you can’t sing.”

Whitman said he learned a day or so ago that an old friend was reporting that Whitman had died on his birthday.

“It got all over,” Whitman said.

Whitman was famous in the early 1950s for hit singles such as Indian Love Call and Love Song of the Waterfall and gained even more popularity in Europe.

He and Jerry, his wife off 66 years, have called Middleburg home since moving there in 1955.

#1107 ParticleHustler

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 03:01 PM

He was convicted of kidnapping 7-year-old Steven Stayner in 1972 and keeping him until 1980. That's when Parnell abducted a second boy and Stayner fled, taking the boy with him.

Stayner's story was told in the television movie "I Know My First Name is Steven." He died in a motorcycle accident in 1989.

Stayner's brother, Cary, is awaiting execution for killing four women in Yosemite National Park in 1999.


I had no idea that they were related (or didn't remember the connection), and I can't believe it's been that long since the Yosemite murders.

#1108 b17yoe

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 09:23 AM

Randy Salerno, CBS 2 Morning Anchor has died....

http://www.chicagotr...0,3049318.story
Whatever.

#1109 nobodies

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Posted 25 January 2008 - 09:50 AM

Randy Salerno, CBS 2 Morning Anchor has died....

http://www.chicagotr...0,3049318.story


This bummed me out this morning. I used to watch him a good deal when he was on WGN. Good anchor, sad news.

#1110 Tony

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Posted 26 January 2008 - 05:11 PM

Christian Brando, the eldest son of the late legendary actor Marlon Brando, died this morning at 1:47 a.m. at Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles, Calif. On Monday, Christian's attorney Benjamin Brin announced that the actor was hospitalized with pneumonia. "The prognosis is for a complete recovery," Brin said, "He's going to be OK." Christian was 49 years old. Christian Brando was born May 11, 1958 as the result of an affair between his father and actress Anna Kashfi. Christian pled guilty to manslaughter in 1990 for killing his sister's boyfriend Dag Drollet. in 2001, actor Robert Blake claimed that Christian was involved in the murder of his wife Bonnie Lee Bakley. Bonnie had been dating Robert Blake and Christian when she became pregnant and initially claimed Christian to be the father until a DNA test later proved the father to be Robert. Robert was charged with her murder and acquitted, then was later found liable in a civil case. Christian dabbled in acting, and had small roles in Yentl and I Love You, Alice B. Toklas! but never acheived the level of fame as his Academy Award winning actor father.

#1111 Tony

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Posted 26 January 2008 - 05:12 PM

George Habash, whose radical PLO faction gained notoriety after the simultaneous hijackings of four western airliners in 1970 and the seizure of an Air France flight to Uganda, is dead at 81. A member of the Palestine National Council says Habash died Saturday in Jordan. The former guerrilla leader, a rival of Yasser Arafat, died of a heart attack in Amman, said Leila Khaled, who is a leading member of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, which Habash founded. Born to a Christian Arab family, Habash opposed Arab-Israeli peace talks. His group was the second-largest in the PLO after Fatah, the faction of Arafat and current Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas. Habash and his group gained notoriety for the 1970 hijackings of four western airliners over the United States, Europe, the Far East and the Persian Gulf. The aircraft were blown up in the Middle East after passengers and crews disembarked. Habash promoted the Palestinian cause through terrorist attacks in the 1970s, including the hijacking of an Air France airliner to Entebbe, Uganda. The group also was responsible for gunning down 27 people at Israel's Lod airport in May 1972. Abbas declared three-day mourning period for Habash and ordered flags to fly at half-mast. He called Habash a "historic leader" and said he would receive condolences at his office Sunday evening. Habash, an American-educated physician, launched the Popular Front in December 1967, six months after the Arabs lost the West Bank, Gaza Strip and Golan Heights to Israel. Habash opposed interim peace agreements with Israel, in part because they did not require Israel to stop settlement construction. Throughout his life, he supported the use of violence against Israel, arguing that Israel would not make the concessions required for a peace agreement. However, since the early 1980s, he came to support the PLO platform, which calls for the establishment of a Palestinian state in the occupied territories and a "right of return" of Palestinian refugees. Habash frequently criticized Arafat, particularly during his attempts to negotiate with Israel.

#1112 Tony

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Posted 27 January 2008 - 02:40 AM

Former dictator Suharto, an army general who crushed Indonesia's communist movement and pushed aside the country's founding father to usher in 32 years of tough rule that saw up to a million political opponents killed, died Sunday. He was 86. "He has died," Dr. Christian Johannes told The Associated Press, adding that he died at 1:10 p.m. Finally toppled by mass street protests in 1998, the U.S. Cold War ally's departure opened the way for democracy in this predominantly Muslim nation of 235 million people and he withdrew from public life, rarely venturing from his comfortable villa on a leafy lane in the capital. Suharto had ruled with a totalitarian dominance that saw soldiers stationed in every village, instilling a deep fear of authority across this Southeast Asian nation of some 6,000 inhabited islands that stretch across more than 3,000 miles. Since being forced from power, he had been in and out of hospitals after strokes caused brain damage and impaired his speech. Blood transfusions and a pacemaker prolonged his life, but he suffered from lung, kidney, liver and heart problems. Suharto was admitted to a hospital on Jan. 4 and had been in intensive care. Over the past week his physicians had spoken of a recovery, but that had changed dramatically by Sunday, when his condition took a sharp downturn.

#1113 Tony

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Posted 27 January 2008 - 01:18 PM

Viktor Schreckengost, a Clevelander who ranked as one of the leading industrial designers of the 20th century, died Saturday night at age 101. In a career lasting more than 70 years, Schreckengost had an immense, if largely anonymous, influence on American life and popular culture. Schreckengost's peers included the far more famous designers Raymond Loewy and Norman Bel Geddes. Schreckengost, whose influence ranks with theirs according to scholars, had a quieter and more low-profile career in Cleveland. But he combined artistic brilliance with an acute sensitivity to form and function in designs for everything from trucks to bicycles, furniture, industrial equipment and dinnerware. "The last thing I look at is aesthetics," he said during an interview at his Cleveland Heights home in 2000, on the eve of a major retrospective on his work at the Cleveland Museum of Art. "The first thing I have to solve is the basic function of things." Son-in-law Chip Nowacek said Schreckengost died around 11:30 p.m. Saturday while vacationing in Tallahassee, Fla., as he did regularly in the winter. Brown-Forward Funeral Home on Chagrin Boulevard is handling the arrangements, though nothing has been made as of yet. Schreckengost's body is expected to return to Cleveland later today. Nowacek said his father-in-law had suffered from congestion. But added: "I'd say (he died) more of being 101 of anything else. "We've been reaching out to personal connections and the predominant sense is yes, sadness," Nowacek said. "But the feeling that has been expressed most often is an overwhelming sense of gratitude for the influence and guidance and his example... . That's very, very present people." Schreckengost's designs kept entire industries humming and delighted generations of American consumers. He embodied the can-do attitude of Cleveland at the height of its economic power. A single Schreckengost dishware pattern, "Flower Shop," helped the American Limoges Co. in Sebring avoid financial collapse during the Depression. Demand for the design was so high that the company had to rent kiln space from a competitor to fill orders. Art historian Henry Adams, who organized the Cleveland museum show on Schreckengost, said the Higbee Co. in Cleveland sold 28 railroad boxcar loads of the design. Other products designed by Schreckengost included pedal cars, printing presses, stoves, refrigerators, collators, machine tools, riding lawn mowers, lawn furniture, tractors, dinnerware, toys, streetlights, broadcast equipment, gearshift consoles, flashlights, theater costumes, stage sets, artificial limbs, typesetting machines, coffins, calendars, chairs, electric fans, lenses, logos, ball gowns and baby walkers. "Chances are that almost every adult in America has ridden in, drunk out of, eaten off of, mowed their lawns with, sat on, placed a call with, lit the night with, hid their hooch in or had an arm or leg replaced with something created by Viktor Schreckengost," said Chip Nowacek, the designer's stepson, in an interview in 2005. Watercolor titled "Aaron and the Serpent," by Viktor Schreckengost.Nowacek and his mother, Gene Schreckengost, the designer's second wife, a retired pediatrician, organized a foundation to raise awareness about the designer's work. It was the kind of activity the self-effacing Schreckengost never undertook on his own behalf. In an age of specialization, Schreckengost was a great generalist of design. "His career has an extraordinary way of one thing leading to another," Adams said of Schreckengost on the eve of the museum's exhibition. "He'll design bicycles, and that will lead to headlights, and that will lead to flashlights and then lighting systems." Schreckengost's most famous creations included his Art Deco-inspired "Jazz Bowl," created for Eleanor Roosevelt, when her husband, Franklin D. Roosevelt, was governor of New York State. Glazed in black and faience blue with skyscrapers, cruise ships, pipe organs and street lamps, it voiced Schreckengost's passion for New York City in the jazz age. Schreckengost said he didn't know the identity of the client when he designed the bowl for Cowan Pottery in Rocky River. He simply pulled a work order out of a basket and did his job. It was only later on that he discovered the original buyer wanted two additional bowls -- one for the family mansion in Hyde Park, N.Y., and one for the White House. A decade ago, the Cleveland Museum of Art recently bought an early version of the bowl at auction for $110,000. In 1933, Schreckengost designed the first truck with the cab over the engine for the White Motor Co. This innovation made it possible to build trucks with longer cargo beds and better maneuverability. In the 1950s, he designed a wildly popular line of pedal cars for Murray Ohio, then the world's largest producer of bicycles. Schreckengost's working methods were down-to-earth. To create a mold for the seat for his metal Beverly Hills Lawn Chair in 1941, he put eight inches of soft clay on top of a barrel lid, covered the clay with plastic, and asked hundreds of employees at the Murray Ohio Co. to sit on the clay sandwich. Voila: A seat was born. Courtesy of Herbert Ascherman Viktor Schreckengost, seen here posing with his sculpture of an African woman in 2001. Son-in-law Chip Nowacek said today: "We've been reaching out to personal connections and the predominant sense is yes, sadness. But the feeling that has been expressed most often is an overwhelming sense of gratitude for the influence and guidance and his example... . That's very, very present people." Such directness inspired generations of students at the Cleveland Institute of Art, where he founded the Department of Industrial Design. Some of the most influential talents shaped by Schreckengost included Giuseppe Delena, a chief designer at Ford Motor Co.; Joe Oros, designer of the Ford Mustang; and Jerry Hirschberg, head of Nissan Design International. Cleveland industrial designer John Nottingham, an institute alumnus and former student of Schreckengost, once estimated that more than 1,000 industrial designers studied with Schreckengost, and that collectively they have had a huge impact on the national economy. But while other designers negotiated lucrative licensing agreements with manufacturers, Schreckengost never sought riches and lived quietly and modestly in a large Cleveland Heights house packed with artworks and mementoes from his career. In his 90s, he fed squirrels in his backyard and played with children on his block, who called him, "Uncle Vik." On top of teaching and designing, Schreckengost made hundreds of watercolors, sculptures, decorative ceramics and works of public art. His creations have been collected by major American museums, including the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. His giant relief sculptures of elephants and birds are among the beloved motifs of the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo. "The work on watercolor and ceramic sculpture was the kind of thing he could do on weekends, because he had a full-time job as an industrial designer," Adams said. Born in Sebring, Ohio, in 1906, Schreckengost was the son of a potter who worked at the French China Co. The family name derived from German for "frightening guest," a reference to Viking raiders. After studying at the Cleveland Institute of Art with leading Cleveland artists including Frank Wilcox and Paul Travis, Schreckengost won a scholarship and attended the Vienna Kunstgewerbe School for a year with the leading ceramic artist, Michael Powolny. He also took criticism from the great Viennese architect and furniture designer, Josef Hofmann. He also traveled widely in the 1930s. He attended the May Day Parade in Moscow in 1930, the same year he designed the Jazz Bowl. In 1937, he stood yards away from Hitler and Mussolini at a parade in Berlin. He witnessed the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War. He exhibited sculptures at the New York World's Fair in 1939. He knew artists such as Charles Burchfield and Rockwell Kent. Once, he received a visit from Edgar Kaufmann Jr., whose father commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to design Fallingwater, the famous house cantilevered over a waterfall in the mountains of Pennsylvania. Schreckengost said the younger Kaufmann told him that "with that water flowing under the living room, it was like a toilet running all the time." During World War II, Schreckengost served in the Navy. One of his most important assignments involved repositioning radar equipment behind American lines to help win the Battle of the Bulge. Schreckengost's many honors included a Gold Medal from the American Institute of Architects, which he won in 1958; numerous May Show prizes from the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Fine Arts Award from the Women's City Club of Cleveland. Whenever Schreckengost received a design assignment, he said he always asked himself "how could I take it and make it simpler and take labor out of it, so it's cheaper?" But underlying all his work was an even more profound question: "Why should only the wealthy have good design?"

#1114 Tony

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Posted 28 January 2008 - 12:53 AM

President Gordon B. Hinckley of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints died this evening. He was 97. Hinckley's life spanned the 20th century, a time marked by LDS global outreach and technological advances. Hie saw his church evolve from a tiny sect in the Intermountain West to a respected religious movement with more than 13 million members worldwide. He embraced each new communication device, from radio to satellite to YouTube, as a chance to spread the Mormon word. He began his career in the 1930s as a missionary defending the faith on a soapbox in London's Hyde Park and lived to see the country's first viable Mormon candidate for president. Through it all, Hinckley worked tirelessly to gain acceptance for his church on the world's stage. "We are not a weird people," Hinckley told Mike Wallace in a 1995 "60 Minutes" interview. With the shrewdness of a politician, Hinckley downplayed the more controversial aspects of LDS history. He welcomed the world to Utah for the 2002 Olympic Winter Games, promising everyone they could get a drink here and accepted one of America's highest honors - the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He highlighted Mormon commonality with other Christians, forging alliances with other faith groups while scolding LDS Church members for being too clannish, self-righteous and unfriendly to their neighbors. "This church has grown into a great worldwide organization affecting for good the lives of people in more than 140 nations," Hinckley told The New York Times in 1995. "You can't, you don't, build out of pessimism or cynicism. You look with optimism, work with faith, and things happen." Even as he looked outward, Hinckley energized the faithful with his forward-thinking proposals. He undertook the most ambitious building program in the church's history, including the massive Conference Center near Temple Square and 83 temples - that's 24 more in TK years than the 50 constructed in the previous 165 years of LDS history. He created a plan to help returned missionaries in Third World countries get an education. He revitalized missionary work, worked on the retention of new converts, sent apostles to live in far-flung regions for the first time in Mormon history, and replaced many paid positions with volunteers. Hinckley also remodeled the image of a Mormon leader. When he became the church's 15th president in March 1995 at 84 years old, Hinckley essentially had been leading the church for more than a decade due to the frail health of his predecessors. He was determined to defy the view of LDS presidents as feeble, secretive and quaintly parochial. He dazzled people - members and outsiders alike - with his encyclopedic memory and almost superhuman work ethic. During his TK years as president, Hinckley gave more than 2,000 speeches, visited more than 150 countries, and greeted hundreds of diplomats and ambassadors. He was interviewed by journalists from nearly every major American newspaper, charming many with his folksy wisdom and self-deprecating humor. "Treat me well," he would say with a sly grin. "I'm just an old man." Yet even in his 90s, the figure Mormons consider a "prophet, seer and revelator" rarely thought like an old man. "His keen intellect and thirst to understand how everything works resulted in a storehouse of knowledge that will be nearly irreplaceable," said Elder Marlin Jensen, the church's official historian. "I believe he was a true prophet but it didn't hurt that he was a genius, too." Roots of leadership Throughout childhood, Hinckley split his time between a Salt Lake City home and a farm in East Millcreek, where he learned to work the land, love the trees and grow his Mormon faith. It was there where he had his first spiritual experience. He was about 5 years old and suffering from a painful earache. "My mother prepared a bag of table salt and put it on the stove to warm," he said in 2000. "My father softly put his hands upon my head and gave me a blessing, rebuking the pain and the illness by authority of the holy priesthood and in the name of Jesus Christ. He then took me tenderly in his arms and placed the bag of warm salt at my ear. The pain subsided and left." Cradled in his father's arms, Hinckley drifted off to sleep, his father's words lingering in his mind. "That is the earliest remembrance I have of the exercise of the authority of the priesthood in the name of the Lord," he said. While the Hinckley home was awash in Mormon practices, it was also a place of learning. The five children (as well as several half-siblings) read Harvard classics around the kitchen table, where Hinckley became a devotee of Milton, Shakespeare, Kipling and especially Charles Dickens. Such wide-ranging reading was unusual for a homespun Mormon family, but it provided the wellspring of education to which Hinckley would return again and again in his career. It allowed him to speak "non-Mormon" fluently. In 1998, Hinckley wrote a small volume, Standing for Something: Ten Neglected Virtues That Will Heal Our Hearts and Homes, in which he drew on many childhood experiences without a single use of uniquely LDS language or beliefs. To the faithful, Hinckley spoke in simple, imperative sentences like a grandfather - stern when condemning abuse, pornography or racism, gentle when encouraging faith and devotion. No grand theology, no fancy wordplay. Just no-nonsense advice. "For the most part we are a happy people," he said at the 1998 Semi-Annual General Conference. "We're mindful of and continue to pray for those who are experiencing hardship due to natural or man-caused calamity. But even those among our number who are bowed down with sorrow and pain, go forward in faith with the certain assurance that God lives and is watching over his children." Hinckley told Jensen he had no particular system for crafting his speeches. "I just keep reading and clipping things and putting them in a drawer," the Mormon prophet said. "Then, when I have a talk to give, I go to the drawer and whatever is on top is what they get." Such humor belies the truth, Jensen said. "Few have ever been as eloquent and inspiring in their speaking as he. He could relate and connect with everyone - old and young, rich and poor, educated and unlearned." Building a career Hinckley's two-year mission to England at the height of the Great Depression was an education in itself. He learned how to deflect antagonistic questions and discovered what would become his life's work - using the printed word, and later the airwaves, to promote the faith. In 1933, few Britains were joining the American church, and many heaped insults and ridicule on its young representatives. Mormon missionaries would preach from portable podiums in London's Hyde Park while onlookers challenged them to verbal duels. "We learned to speak quickly on our feet. And Elder Hinckley was the best of the bunch," the late Wendell Ashton, one of Hinckley's missionary companions, told LDS Apostle Jeffrey Holland. The missionaries had no set oral presentation or prepared materials to distribute other than a few pamphlets and the faith's scripture, The Book of Mormon. "Our conversion rate was terrible," said Ashton, former publisher of the church-owned Deseret Morning News. "We would just knock on doors and try to teach people, and it wasn't a good method." At the end of his mission, Hinckley complained about the lack of aids to his mission president, who ordered him to report immediately back to LDS Church headquarters in Salt Lake City, rather than tour the Holy Land as he had planned. When Hinckley had given his report, LDS President Heber J. Grant hired him on the spot. At 24, Hinckley took over the newly created Church Radio, Publicity and Mission Literature Committee and would spend much of the next five decades thinking of new ways to get the church and its message into the American consciousness. He wrote and edited scripts and supervised production for a radio series, "Fullness of Times," which featured 39 half-hour dramatizations of church history. He persuaded Mormon leaders to sponsor an exhibit at the 1938 World's Fair in San Francisco, including a scale model of the famed Mormon Tabernacle on Temple Square and daily organ recitals. He produced a similar exhibit for the centennial of the 1849 discovery of gold in California, with a replica of a cabin occupied by members of the Mormon Battalion. Told in heroic detail, the Mormon story was repeated over and over as a way to attract potential converts - or at least to correct what Hinckley saw as public misconceptions of LDS teachings. With his help, the church built a vast media empire, including radio and televisions stations. It had produced award-winning TV spots and ads for the church in Reader's Digest magazine. It had satellite technology at every wardhouse on the planet and could beam the sermons around the world. Hinckley began his globe-trotting duties after he was named an apostle on Oct. 5, 1961. While on speaking assignments, he was always available to comfort members in need. He was in Tonga when a boatload of Mormons drowned. He was in South America when a devastating earthquake hit Peru. He was in South Korea when there were gunshots in the streets. As the decades passed, Hinckley shouldered more and more of the church's bureaucratic burdens. Taking the lead In 1981, President Spencer W. Kimball was weakened by brain surgery and his two aged counselors in the governing First Presidency were scarcely more capable of managing the church's affairs. So Kimball took the unusual move of bringing Hinckley, then an apostle, into the First Presidency as a third counselor. From that day forward, Hinckley took on nearly the entire responsibility of leading the church, all the while seeming to be but a dutiful soldier bravely serving his general. After Kimball's death, Hinckley would help the enfeebled President Ezra Taft Benson in much the same way. When Hinckley ascended to the church presidency in 1995, then, he was better prepared for the office than any man before him. He knew the church's system and programs intimately because he had designed many of them, much as he built his own home as a young man. Architect, engineer, electrician, roofer, carpenter, brick layer and plumber all in one, Hinckley often boasted that he hammered every nail in the home - and never a one on Sunday. Over time, he planted more than 1,000 trees on his East Millcreek acreage. "There is something in me that makes me plant trees each spring," he said in 2003. "They are very small now, but in 20 years they will be magnificent." Designing spaces, ripping out walls, planting seeds for the future - this is what Hinckley did for the church, its people and programs. Hinckley conceived and directed the transformation of the grand old Hotel Utah into an office building for church employees. After awakening from a dream, he sketched a temple that would be built atop a commercial building in Hong Kong. He remembered tiny details - when a certain chapel's roof was last replaced, or the name of someone he met years earlier. He instituted smaller, less expensive temples to serve members in remote areas. For the first time in its history, the church launched a humanitarian service department that spent millions of dollars in emergency relief for people outside the faith. Hinckley also created a Perpetual Education Fund to help returned missionaries in Third World countries go to college. And no one took a stronger lead in the church's political efforts. He built alliances with other Christian denominations to oppose same-sex marriages and defend religious liberties. In 1998, Hinckley announced a "Proclamation on the Family," which laid out the church's support for the sanctity of marriage, the significance of family and the importance of chastity. That became the theological foundation for the church's opposition to any effort to promote same-sex marriage. In 2000, the LDS Church defended the Boy Scouts' right to exclude gays from leadership positions, and the church and its members in Alaska and Hawaii gave time and well over $1 million to thwart same-sex marriage initiatives; in 1999, members in California helped finance the push for a Protection of Marriage Act on that state's ballot. "What's a church for if it isn't to fight for values, to take a stand and face up to these moral issues?" Hinckley said in a February 2000 interview with The Salt Lake Tribune. Mormon rock star When Hinckley became president in 1995, the man who once dreamed of becoming a reporter had come full circle. He seemed to thrive on media attention, bantering with journalists and honing his skills at artfully dodging questions. He repeatedly mentioned that Mormons were just ordinary people, trying to live simple, moral lives. He downplayed controversial aspects of the church's history, especially polygamy. "It was a very limited practice, carefully safeguarded. In 1890, that practice was discontinued," Hinckley told CNN interviewer Larry King. "That's 118 years ago. It's behind us." While that didn't satisfy critics who argued that the church continued sanctioning polygamous marriages into the early decades of the 20th century and that it's still part of the church's scriptures, it went a long way toward eliminating Mormonism's image as strange and foreign. Hinckley also took his message of normalcy to other countries as he dedicated temples there. He launched a series of "cultural nights" where members in the region could gather in giant stadiums to show off their unique traditions and talents. Such giant public events helped mute the suspicion of this American church. It also elevated Hinckley in the eyes of local members. When Hinckley entered those arenas - or, indeed, in any large gathering of the faithful - the crowd instinctively stood up and grew suddenly silent. Yet such hero worship had its downside. He could never take a stroll on Salt Lake City's Main Street Plaza or a city park without being besieged. As he recovered from his 2006 surgery in a Salt Lake hospital, he was virtually imprisoned in his room to protect him from well-meaning intrusions. To the end, Hinckley faced head on the seduction of veneration. "Adulation is a disease I fight every day," Hinckley said. On the homefront Though he was constantly looking beyond the Wasatch Mountains, Hinckley never lost sight of the importance of Salt Lake City as the church's headquarters. He built goodwill by opening the Tabernacle on Temple Square to interfaith groups, by creating an Inner City Mission to help people find their way out of poverty, illness and addiction, and by contributing to the restoration of the Catholic Cathedral of the Madeleine and Westminster College of Salt Lake City. In February 2004, as his wife Marjorie lay dying, Hinckley's secretary called homeless advocate Pamela Atkinson to say the president "was very concerned with the very cold weather we were having." He wondered how they were managing and wanted to give some of his own money to Atkinson to help them, Atkinson said. "That was the third time Hinckley did this," she recalled. "Here's a man who is a leader of a worldwide church, his wife is not well, and he thinks about homeless people and how he can help. I was taken aback and in awe." For all his sensitivity to outsiders, though, Hinckley sometimes charged ahead without anticipating the anger his actions might generate. The prime example was in 1997, when the LDS Church bought a block of Main Street from Salt Lake City to extend its headquarters, closing it to traffic and eliminating free expression there. The move was opposed by many residents, some of whom joined an unsuccessful lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union. As the suit progressed through the courts, various groups emerged, notably the Alliance for Unity, to try to salve the hurt on both sides. Then came the 2002 Winter Olympics. Hinckley promised the church would not use the occasion to proselytize and instructed his missionaries in Utah to stand down. Mormon volunteers even took a class in how to break the habit of preaching the Mormon gospel. Utahns from every religious group worked shoulder to shoulder in hopes that Salt Lake would take its place as a worldly, welcoming city. During the Games, President George W. and Laura Bush, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan, German President Johannes Rau and many other national and international dignitaries all paid courtesy calls on Hinckley. He watched most of the 2002 Olympic events on TV and was especially wowed by the half-pipe snowboard gyrotechnics. What could be more American - and normal - than that?

#1115 Rob Gordon

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Posted 29 January 2008 - 08:25 AM

We are devastated to report that John Stewart passed away early on the morning of January 19th. John suffered a massive stroke on Thursday evening. He was surrounded by his family & friends.

The world has lost one of its best men, but a man who lived well and made many people happy with his love, his wit and his music. John Stewart lives on in all of us and will never be forgotten.

Link


Not enough commenting on this one from a music centric board.
Member of the Kingston Trio. Lindsey Buckingham was a big fan and produced his late 70's work including big hit, "Gold".
Also wrote "Daydream Believer".
Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#1116 elcorazon

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Posted 29 January 2008 - 09:56 AM

We are devastated to report that John Stewart passed away early on the morning of January 19th. John suffered a massive stroke on Thursday evening. He was surrounded by his family & friends.

The world has lost one of its best men, but a man who lived well and made many people happy with his love, his wit and his music. John Stewart lives on in all of us and will never be forgotten.

Link


Not enough commenting on this one from a music centric board.
Member of the Kingston Trio. Lindsey Buckingham was a big fan and produced his late 70's work including big hit, "Gold".
Also wrote "Daydream Believer".

plus, he's somehow distantly related to bobsatwork. norty's a fan of some of his work, having sent me some stuff of his. I was surprised this was barely a blip as well.

maybe it needed a music side thread.

than again, the board's not too into folk, present company excepted.
Sail Away: The Songs of Randy Newman -7.5/10
Dusty Springfield - Dusty in Memphis 8.5/10
Buddy & Julie Miller - Written in Chalk wow, first listen, but great great record! 9.3/10
Justin Townes Earle - Midnight at the Moviessurprisingly great, never picked up his past releases, but this one's knocking my socks off right away, 8.7/10
M. Ward - Hold Time 8.0/10
Neko Case -Middle Cyclone her best I've heard is my initial impression, but too soon to rate, haven't had a really good listen yet 7.8/10

#1117 Tony

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Posted 29 January 2008 - 12:28 PM

Margaret Truman Daniel, the only child of former President Harry Truman, died Tuesday. She was 83. Daniel died in Chicago following a brief illness, according to a statement from the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum in Independence. She had been living in an assisted living facility for the past several weeks and was on a respirator, the library said. Daniel, a longtime resident of New York City, was also the author of mystery novels, many of them set in Washington D.C.; books on the White House; and biographies, including books on her father and her mother, Bess W. Truman. The Truman Library said Daniel was one of the eldest surviving children of an American president, second only to John Eisenhower, the son of former President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

#1118 Tony

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 12:51 PM

J.W. "Jack" Hinckley, whose son attempted to assassinate President Reagan, has died. He was 82. Hinckley, who had been in declining health, died Tuesday, according to Nelsen Funeral Home. He had lived in Williamsburg for 22 years with his wife of 61 years, Jo Ann. A memorial service will be held Saturday at Williamsburg Presbyterian Church. John Hinckley Jr. has been committed to a Washington, D.C., psychiatric hospital since he shot and wounded President Reagan in 1981. Hinckley, who said he was trying to impress actress Jodie Foster, was found not guilty by reason of insanity. In 2005, a federal judge ruled that Hinckley would be allowed brief visits to the family's home, about three hours from Washington. Last year, Hinckley's doctors said he was ready to spend more time away from the hospital but a judge found that hospital administrators had not proposed a structure to ensure such trips would be safe.

#1119 Tony

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Posted 02 February 2008 - 04:56 PM

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. -- Former Secretary of Agriculture and dean of Purdue University's College of Agriculture, Earl Butz, died in his sleep overnight, Purdue announced today.. He was 98. "He was a tireless advocate for agriculture and his efforts helped bring Purdue Agriculture into international prominence," said Randy Woodson, Glenn W. Sample Dean of Agriculture atPurdue, in a news release from the university. Butz earned a bachelors of science degree in agriculture from Purdue in 1932 and earned the first doctoral degree in agricultural economics awarded at Purdue in 1937. He was dean of agricultre from 1957 to 1967. He was Secretary of Agriculture from 1971 to 1976, under Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford. He was forced to resign after it was reported he made a racist remark to entainer Pat Boone and former White House counsel John Dean on a commercial flight following the Repbulican National Convention. In 1999, Butz donated $1 million to Purdue's Department of Agricultural Economics. Butz, a native of Albion Ind., married Mary Emma Powell, from North Carolina, in 1937. They ,et in 1930 at the National 4-H Camp in Washington D.C. She died in July 1995. Visitation will be Feb. 9 at 9:30 a.m. in the Federated Church in West Lafayette, Ind. The funeral will be at 11a.m. in the sanctuary. Memorial contributions may be made to the Federated Church, 2400 Sycamore Lane, West Lafayette, IN 47906 or the Earl Butz scholarshipfund at Purdue University.

#1120 Tony

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Posted 03 February 2008 - 11:37 PM

she must have died of a broken heart...

Joanne Barron Renfro, age 76, of Powell, went home to be with the Lord 7:00 a.m. Friday, February 1, 2008.

She was a member of Tekoa Baptist Church and preceded in death by her husband, Jack Renfro; parents, William and Mima Barron; brother, William Barron; sister, Genieve Mays; and grandson, Brad Renfro.

Survivors: sons and daughters-in-law, Mike and Peggy Renfro of Powell, Mark and Kim Renfro of Louisville, TN; grandson, Jack Renfro of Powell; step grandson, Dane Hoffmeister and many nieces and nephews.

A funeral service will be held 8:00 p.m. Monday at Stevens Mortuary Chapel with Pastor Bill Dean officiating. The family and friends will meet 12:45 p.m. Tuesday at Glencoe Cemetery in Big Stone Gap, VA for a graveside service and interment at 1:00 p.m.

The family will receive friends from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. Monday at Stevens Mortuary, Oglewood Avenue at North Broadway.