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#1161 Tony

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 09:11 AM

4 days late on Gerber but more info!

#1162 Rob Gordon

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 10:23 AM

Well, my friend's father passed away and though his notoriety may be local he deserves notice in the thread. From today's Plain Dealer Renowned Plain Dealer sportswriter Chuck Heaton, 90, died Thursday, surrounded by his children and grandchildren. "The whole family was there, all crowded into his room," said Heaton's son, Plain Dealer entertainment writer Michael Heaton. "He said goodbye to every single one of us, he left no stone unturned, the perfect exit strategy. He had a good, long life." Heaton said his father became ill with pneumonia on Thursday at Harborside Healthcare in Westlake, where he has lived for the past nine months. "He had gone through a lot of mini-strokes and had some mobility problems," Heaton said. "The pneumonia made him lose 10 pounds, weight he could not afford to lose, and he just could not recover." His daughter, Patricia Heaton, a star of the long-running television show "Everybody Loves Raymond," said her father always supported her -- even when he disagreed with her. "When I was moving to New York after college, my dad was against the idea," she said. "But when he saw that I was determined to go, he just said, 'How much money do you need?' and wrote me a check for $800. And whenever he came to visit me, he never showed his cringe when he had to step over homeless people to walk up to my dumpy apartment." Chuck Heaton had gained a reputation for speed, accuracy and fairness in the 50 years he reported for sports at The Plain Dealer, until his retirement in 1993. There are no official records on this, but Heaton probably holds The Plain Dealer record for most bylines. The inexhaustible sportswriter covered just about everything in his 50 years at this newspaper, satisfying readers with his intelligent, conversational style. Russ Schneider of Seven Hills was hired as a Plain Dealer sportswriter on Heaton's recommendation in 1955 while still a student at Baldwin-Wallace College. "He was my mentor, we worked together for years," he said. "I covered the Indians and he covered the Browns, then in 1978, after 14 years on baseball, they put me on the Browns so Chuck could write his column and Browns sidebars. We worked together until we both retired in 1993. He was a great guy." At his prolific peak in the 1960s and 1970s, Heaton wrote a sports column, "Plain Talk," that ran four days a week, and simultaneously served as the Browns beat writer, turning out a daily story plus a notes column, "Extra Points." He was at 24 of the first 25 Super Bowls. Somehow, he found time to crank out a weekly column on TV sports. He wrote stories on the Indians' home games, the Kentucky Derby, the Indianapolis 500, golf and tennis. He covered local colleges when Baldwin-Wallace Olympic track champion Harrison Dillard and John Carroll football players Don Shula and Carl Taseff flourished. "In all the years that I coached, I always felt we had a close relationship. I always admired and respected his work," Shula said. "At that time, you had more of a personal relationship with writers. The media has gotten so big and the coverage so extensive, you can't have that kind of relationship of the old days." Heaton handled the "Glad You Asked" feature, in which he answered readers' daily questions, for his final nine years before retiring in 1993. He turned out fast, clean copy, filling two type-written pages in 10 minutes if necessary. Beloved writer He was highly regarded by players, owners and readers for his objectivity, fairness and good sense. New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner, who grew up reading Heaton when he was a boy in Rocky River, had him on the short list of sportswriters he would call back. Former Cleveland Browns running back Leroy Kelly told clevelandbrowns.com that he loved reading Heaton's articles about the team since he started with the Browns in 1964. "He wasn't that type of writer to get down on players when we were doing bad," he wrote. "Back then, we had some pretty good teams and great ballplayers. He enjoyed writing about the team, being a part of the team. He always had that great smile on his face." He said Heaton worked hard to get him into the Hall of Fame. "I always wanted him to be my presenter," he wrote. "I would see him at the Super Bowl games and he would say, 'It's just a matter of time. Be patient and we'll get those votes.' [That day is] is one of the greatest moments of my life." Joe Browne, executive vice president of communications for the NFL, remembers meeting Heaton at one of the Green Bay-Dallas championship games in the 1960s. "I was still in college and impressionable," he said. "I said to my boss at the time, Jim Kensil, 'Mr. Heaton's really a nice man.' Kensil said, 'Don't kid yourself, they're not all like that.' I also know how much respect Pete Rozelle had for Chuck during Pete's time as commissioner." Former Browns quarterback Brian Sipe, long after he retired, would always end conversations with Cleveland sportswriters by saying, "Tell Chuck Heaton I said hello." When he heard that Heaton was to receive an honor, Sipe called from his home in California to get the date and time of the ceremony. He wanted to make sure to attend. Heaton was inducted into eight halls of fame during his career. In 1980, Heaton won the Pro Football Writers Association award for distinguished reporting. He received the honor before a breakfast crowd of 2,300 in Canton. His plaque resides in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Joe Horrigan, vice president of communications at the Pro Football Hall of Fame, which awarded Heaton the Dick McCann Memorial Award, said Heaton was a "tremendous" part of the organization. "Even before the Hall of Fame opened its doors, Chuck was involved in a committee here in Canton to make contact with former players and collect artifacts for the museum," Horrigan said. "He was a charter member of the board of selectors, serving from 1963 until 1994, and served on our seniors committee." Horrigan said Heaton was a confidante. "He was always someone Don Smith [former Hall of Fame vice president] would turn to for advice and guidance as they moved the selection process up to the level it is today," he said. More honors Heaton was inducted into the Halls of Fame for the Cleveland Press Club, the Society of Professional Journalists, John Carroll University, the Greater Cleveland Sports Foundation, the Touchdown Club, the Greater Cleveland Sports Hall of Fame, and the now-defunct Sports Media Association of Cleveland and Ohio. As renowned as he was locally, he gained national attention as the father of Patricia. The writers of "Everybody Loves Raymond" would occasionally mention Heaton in their storylines. He was a visitor to the set, socializing with the actors. Cable TV stations did three biographies of Patricia in which Chuck Heaton was interviewed. Like father, like son His son, Michael, a longtime Plain Dealer columnist, is the third-generation member of the family to work at the newspaper. Michael, growing up in his father's shadow, did not come to The PD until establishing his own identity and style at People Magazine in New York and the San Francisco Examiner. Chuck Heaton's father, Charles, who died in 1937, was the transportation manager for The PD. His sister, Mrs. Edward O'Connor, was the wife of the paper's advertising manager. Tragedy struck Heaton's life on Jan. 20, 1971, when his wife, Patricia, died of a brain aneurysm at age 46. They had been married almost 22 years and she was the mother of their five children. Her father was Seth Hurd, a longtime Cleveland judge. Heaton married Cecilia Evers, an advertising executive, in 1975. Cecilia, called CeCe, and Heaton stayed together for the rest of his life. Heaton was born Oct. 22, 1917, in Yonkers, N.Y., where his father was employed. He came to Cleveland as an infant and grew up here. He graduated from Lakewood High School in 1934 and John Carroll in 1938. He graduated cum laude from Carroll, serving as sports editor of the Carroll News and the Carillon Yearbook. He was vice president of his class for three years and was on the tennis team. After graduation, he became the JCU sports publicist and tennis coach. He was hired by The Plain Dealer in 1942, starting out on the news side. His first story was about the last milkman in town to make his deliveries with a horse-drawn wagon. Wins Bronze Star He went into military service for three years during World War II, serving in Air Force intelligence in North Africa, Italy, Corsica, France and Germany. He wrote a history of the 324th Fighting Group of the Ninth Air Force, for which he received a Bronze Star. After his discharge in 1945, he returned to The Plain Dealer and was soon put into the sports department. He and the late Harry Jones were the bright young men of the sports department at the time. Both covered the 1948 Indians, who won Cleveland's last World Series. In those days, the baseball-reporting position was the top job in sports, and Heaton hoped to be chosen. But Jones was named the baseball writer and Heaton was given the Browns beat. As it turned out, it was a lucky break, for the Browns soon eclipsed the Indians as the No.¤1 team in town, featuring superstars such as Otto Graham and Jim Brown. Nevertheless, Heaton maintained his card in the Baseball Writers Association of America. When he retired, he held the No.¤1 card in the association, meaning he had the longest working tenure of any baseball writer in the country. Goes to altar In June 1949, Heaton married Pat. They met on a Lakewood tennis court. She was a skilled tennis player, having been a member of the Junior Wightman Cup team in her late teens. She was also a fine swimmer and golfer. Heaton had no trouble adapting to the Browns beat. His outgoing personality was perfect for dealing with the players. In later years he reminisced that it was more fun covering football in those early days because the players were not being paid like plutocrats. "You could buy them a couple of beers and talk to them," he recalled in 1990. "Their salaries were about the same as sportswriters." He became a fixture on the beat. He seldom wrote anything controversial, although he aggressively pursued news stories. After the 1961 season, when quarterback Milt Plum complained to Heaton about his role in the Browns offense, the passer was quickly traded by the great coach Paul Brown. Another major scoop came when he learned Browns coach Forrest Gregg was to be fired in 1977. Three champions Heaton covered the Browns when they won the 1954 NFL crown, beating Detroit, 56-10, and the 1955 title, when they routed Los Angeles, 38-14, under coach Brown. He was the only writer on a major newspaper to predict a Browns victory over favored Baltimore in the 1964 title game. The Browns won, 27-0, under Blanton Collier. He had hoped to be named Plain Dealer sports editor when Gordon Cobbledick retired in 1964, but the job was given to Hal Lebovitz. That turned out to be a break also, for he continued to work at The PD until he finally hung it up at age 76. Had he been sports editor, he would have had to retire at 65, a company rule for executives at the time. Pat had her hands full raising five children, but sometimes she would go on vacation with Heaton. In 1967, he took her to the NFL owners meetings in Arizona. The first day they were there, the sitter called and said Sharon had broken her leg. Pat flew back immediately. Tragedy strikes In January 1971, Heaton and Pat were getting ready to go to the Super Bowl in Miami. Their bags were packed. The morning before they left, Pat cried out, pains shooting through her head. She underwent two surgeries but died on Jan. 20. The shocked Heaton was left with his five children, Sharon, 20, Alice, 18, Michael, 14, Patricia, 12, and Frances, 10. In July 1972, on the day of Alice's wedding, Heaton wrote a column saying coach Nick Skorich would have to get along without his help for a few days. His daughter was getting married. Heaton continued to work hard. Aside from his Plain Dealer duties, he was the area correspondent for Sports Illustrated and wrote in Pro Football Digest. "He had five kids to support," recalled Michael Heaton. "We went to Catholic schools on his free-lancing." Good job Heaton was a devout Roman Catholic. He liked to jog and was not averse to taking a drink. He would have a martini before dinner each night. Often he would have a drink before writing a story. Michael recalls coming into the kitchen of their Bay Village home and seeing his father listening to the radio to an Indians game, typing a story, a beer at his side. "That looks like a good job," the son thought. Heaton often took the boy to the Browns training camp in Hiram or brought him to the office on his day off, when he would answer mail. Michael answered the phones in the office for a while, giving scores to callers. As a measure of the esteem in which he was held by players, Browns running back Leroy Kelly chose Heaton to be his presenter when he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1994. Heaton covered the Browns into his 70s, working on features and sidebars. Two years after his retirement, owner Art Modell moved the Browns to Baltimore. Heaton immediately phoned him. Modell said that was the second call he had received. The other was from President George Bush. Heaton asked Modell to leave the Browns name and colors in Cleveland. Whether the sportswriter's call had anything to do with it or not, Modell acquiesced. Everybody liked Heaton.
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#1163 brainstorm

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 11:50 AM

Well, my friend's father passed away and though his notoriety may be local he deserves notice in the thread.

From today's Plain Dealer

Renowned Plain Dealer sportswriter Chuck Heaton, 90, died Thursday, surrounded by his children and grandchildren.



His daughter, Patricia Heaton, a star of the long-running television show "Everybody Loves Raymond," said her father always supported her -- even when he disagreed with her.


Any chance their last disagreement was him telling her not to be a dumbass and stop stumping for Bush?

Sounds like a life in full.
"So?" - Dick Cheney

#1164 Rob Gordon

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 12:52 PM

Well, my friend's father passed away and though his notoriety may be local he deserves notice in the thread.

From today's Plain Dealer

Renowned Plain Dealer sportswriter Chuck Heaton, 90, died Thursday, surrounded by his children and grandchildren.



His daughter, Patricia Heaton, a star of the long-running television show "Everybody Loves Raymond," said her father always supported her -- even when he disagreed with her.


Any chance their last disagreement was him telling her not to be a dumbass and stop stumping for Bush?

Sounds like a life in full.



Ha...as I've said in the past, aside from her pro-life stance she's quite liberal.

Yes, he had one full life. I suspect the wake and Mass are going to be quite a celebration.
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#1165 Tony

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 04:40 PM

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Actor Perry Lopez dies at 78
Character thesp played Lt. Escobar in 'Chinatown'

By VARIETY STAFF
Perry Lopez, hardworking character actor who played Lt. Lou Escobar in "Chinatown," died of lung cancer Feb. 14 in Beverly Hills, Calif. He was 78.

Born in New York, Lopez started on the New York stage and moved into B-movies and Westerns including "Creature from the Black Lagoon," "The Lone Ranger" and "The Young Guns." He then segued to TV roles in "Zorro," "The Rifleman," "Bonanza" and "Wagon Train." Usually cast in Hispanic roles, he was also called upon to play Persian in "Omar Khayyam" and a Cossack in "Taras Bulba."

Among his other film appearances were "Mister Roberts" and Chinatown sequel "The Two Jakes"; on TV he appeared on "The Mod Squad," "Charlie's Angels," "Star Trek" and "Hart to Hart."

He is survived by several nieces and nephews.

#1166 Tony

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Posted 15 February 2008 - 04:51 PM

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Actor Robert DoQui dies at 74
Known for role as Sgt. Reed in 'Robocop' films

By VARIETY STAFF
February 15, 2007


Stage, screen and TV actor Robert DoQui , who played the gruff Sgt.
Warren Reed in three "Robocop" films, died Feb. 9 in Los Angeles. He
was 74.


Services will be held at 1 p.m. on Tuesday at the Crystal Cathedral,
12141 Lewis St., Garden Grove.


DoQui also appeared in three Robert Altman films, "Nashville,"
"Buffalo Bill & The Indians" and "Short Cuts," for which he was part
of the Golden Globe and Venice Film Fest award-winning ensemble cast.


Other notable roles include the pimp King George in blaxploitation
classic "Coffy," "Fortune Cookie" and miniseries "How The West Was
Won" and "Centennial."


Born in Stillwater, Okla., DoQui attended Langston U., was a member of
singing group the Langstonaires, and served in the U.S. Air Force
before heading to Hollywood.


Over a 50-year career, he appeared in dozens of TV shows including
"Gunsmoke," "Tarzan," "I Dream of Jeannie," "Happy Days," "The
Jeffersons," "Maude" and "E.R."


With a distinctive voice, he played Pablo Robertson for animated
series "Harlem Globetrotters" and "Scooby-Doo."


DoQui served for ten years on the Board of Directors of the Screen
Actors Guild, advocating for increased participation of women and
minority groups in the media.


He is survived by his life partner Mittie Lawrence; four sons; a
daughter; his 96 year old mother and 10 grandchildren.

#1167 Tony

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Posted 16 February 2008 - 07:21 PM

Paul Cole, man on Beatles' 'Abbey Road' cover, dies

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BAREFOOT BAY - Paul Cole was in one of the most famous photographs of the
20th century, and yet he wasn't famous.


Cole, a longtime Barefoot Bay resident, died Wednesday in Pensacola at age
96. He is clearly seen in the famous shot of the Beatles walking across
London's Abbey Road, used as the front cover of the group's classic 1969
album, "Abbey Road." Over the years, the picture has been reproduced in
books, on posters, coffee mugs, T-shirts and hundreds of other places.


The retired salesman is standing on the sidewalk, just behind the Beatles.
Gawking at them.


In a 2004 interview with Scripps Treasure Coast Newspapers, Cole explained
how he came to be there at that precise moment.


On a London vacation with his wife, Cole - then a resident of Deerfield
Beach - declined to enter a museum on the north London thoroughfare.


"I told her, 'I've seen enough museums. You go on in, take your time and
look around and so on, and I'll just stay out here and see what's going on
outside,'" he recalled.


Parked just outside was a black police van. "I like to just start talking
with people," Cole said. "I walked out, and that cop was sitting there in
that police car. I just started carrying on a conversation with him. I was
asking him about all kinds of things, about the city of London and the
traffic control, things like that. Passing the time of day."


In the picture, Cole is standing next to the police van.


It was 10 a.m., Aug. 8, 1969. Photographer Iain McMillan was on a stepladder
in the middle of the street, photographing the four Beatles as they walked,
single-file, across Abbey Road, John Lennon in his famous white suit, Paul
McCartney without shoes. The entire shoot lasted 10 minutes.


"I just happened to look up, and I saw those guys walking across the street
like a line of ducks," Cole remembered. "A bunch of kooks, I called them,
because they were rather radical-looking at that time. You didn't walk
around in London barefoot."


About a year later, Cole first noticed the "Abbey Road" album on top of the
family record player (his wife was learning to play George Harrison's love
song "Something" on the organ). He did a double-take when he eyeballed
McMillan's photo.


"I had a new sportcoat on, and I had just gotten new shell-rimmed glasses
before I left," he says. "I had to convince the kids that that was me for a
while. I told them, 'Get the magnifying glass out, kids, and you'll see it's
me.'"

#1168 b*derty

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Posted 16 February 2008 - 11:00 PM

wow, great story, wish i could be in a famous album cover.

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#1169 Tony

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Posted 18 February 2008 - 12:48 PM

Alain Robbe-Grillet, the French writer who pioneered the so-called "new novel" genre in the 1950s, died Monday at the age of 85, the Academie Francaise (French Academy) said. He had been admitted to hospital in the Normandy city of Caen over the weekend after suffering a heart ailment. In a series of essays published in 1963 Robbe-Grillet developed the theory of the "new novel" which sought to overturn conventional ideas on fiction-writing. His theory was that traditional notions such as plot and character should be subordinated to impersonal descriptions of physical things. He wrote several best-selling books, including "Les Gommes" (The Erasers), "Le Voyeur" (The Voyeur) and "La Jalousie" (Jealousy). He was also associated with the "New Wave" of French film-making, writing the screenplay for Alain Resnais' "L'Annee Derniere a Marienbad" (Last Year at Marienbad) and making several films under his own name. Robbe-Grillet was born in Brest, in Brittany, in 1922 and after World War II worked as a statistician and then as an agronomist in the Caribbean island of Martinique. His first published book -- "Les Gommes" -- established him as a leader of a new generation of writers that also included Samuel Beckett, Claude Simon and Natalie Serrault. Robbe-Grillet said the term 'new novel' was aimed at "all those seeking new forms for the novel ... and all those who have determined to invent the novel, in other words to invent man." For more than 20 years from 1970 he taught at the University of New York. In all he wrote more than 10 novels, with the last -- "Un Roman Sentimental" (A sentimental novel) -- appearing in 2007. Described by him as a "fairy-tale for adults", this book created a minor scandal in France because of its depictions of incest and paedophilia. He said it was not a serious part of his "oeuvre". In 2004 Robbe-Grillet was elected to the Academie Francaise -- the elite 40-member body that acts as guardian of the French language -- but he never took his seat. Renowned for his love of provocation, he said it was because he refused to wear the Academie's elaborate green uniform. He is survived by his wife Catherine Robbe-Grillet, who is also a novelist.

#1170 ParticleHustler

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Posted 18 February 2008 - 01:45 PM

wow, great story, wish i could be in a famous album cover.


Speaking of great music-related stories about recently deceased guys, did this make it into this thread?


(From Wiki)

Thomas Scot Halpin (February 3, 1954February 9, 2008) is noted for enjoying fifteen minutes of fame—quite literally—on November 20, 1973. The Who were opening their Quadrophenia concert tour at the Cow Palace in suburban San Francisco, and Halpin, a 19-year-old who had recently moved to the area from Muscatine, Iowa, was there with a friend using tickets they had scalped. They arrived to the show thirteen hours early so as to get good seats.[1]

The Who opened the show with three of their earlier hits before launching into material from Quadrophenia, playing eleven of the album’s seventeen songs and then continuing on to other hits. About seventy minutes into the show, drummer Keith Moon, whose fondness for drugs and alcohol was legendary, began to falter during "Won't Get Fooled Again," fell off his drum stool, and passed out. As the house lights went up, Moon was carried offstage by roadies, who placed him in a shower in an attempt to revive him. Their efforts worked. An injection of cortisone got him back onstage after approximately a thirty minute delay.[2]

The show continued with "Magic Bus." The percussion of the song’s opening verses consisted only of Moon hitting two wooden blocks against one another. However, when the drums were actually required, Moon only played for a few more minutes before passing out again. He was carried off—this time not to return. Reportedly, Moon had swallowed four times the amount of tranquilizers offered to him by a fan while remarking, "Of course I can take it. I'm Keith fucking Moon!" Guitarist Pete Townshend later said in an interview that Moon had consumed a large tranquilizer pill, meant to be shot at animals, with a large volume of brandy.[3]

The remaining three band members, frustrated, briefly began ad-libbing, then played "See Me, Feel Me", sans drums, with vocalist Roger Daltrey adding a tambourine for percussion. The song received a huge response, and Townshend thanked the crowd for putting up with a three-quarter-strength band. Instead of leaving the stage, though, Pete asked the crowd, "Can anybody play the drums?" He repeated the question, adding forcefully, "I mean someone good!"[4]


At this time, Halpin and his friend were at the left edge of the stage, and his friend, Mike Danese, began noisily telling the security staff, "He can play!" In truth, Halpin had not played in a year, but Danese made enough of a commotion that he had attracted the concert's promoter, Bill Graham.

"Graham just looked at me and said, 'Can you do it?' And I said "Yes," straight out. Townshend and Daltrey look around and they're as surprised as I am, because Graham put me up there." [5][6]

Halpin was given a shot of brandy for his nerves before sitting at his first drumset since leaving Iowa.

"Then I got really focused, and Townshend said to me, 'I'm going to lead you. I'm going to cue you.'" [7]

Townshend introduced him as "Scot", and went straight into the riff of "Smokestack Lightning". This was a very loose blues jam, Halpin's drum work fitting in well enough, and it shortly became "Spoonful". Less successful, however, was his contribution to the more complex "Naked Eye", and he failed to provide the contrasting tempos despite Townshend attempting to give him instructions. Halpin did not look at all flustered, though, and established a steady beat throughout. The show ended after "Naked Eye", and Halpin took a center-stage bow with Daltrey, Townshend, and bassist John Entwistle. Afterwards, he was taken backstage (with his friend) and given a Who concert jacket, which Halpin said was stolen later that evening.[8]

In later interviews, Daltrey praised Halpin's ability, claiming that the "papers missed it". Interviewed by Rolling Stone, Halpin credited The Who's stamina, admitting "I only played three numbers and I was dead."[9]

Halpin resided in Bloomington, Indiana, with his wife Robin and son, James.[10] According to local newspapers around the Bloomington, Indiana area, Scot Halpin passed away early Feb 2008, aged 54. [11]

#1171 b*derty

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Posted 18 February 2008 - 01:56 PM

god all these amazing stories all passing away in such a short time of each other.

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#1172 Tony

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 01:23 AM

I heard that Jim Jones of Pere Ubu died early this morning.

#1173 zolacolby

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 02:17 PM

This one's for Andy... Melvin A. Traylor Jr.: 1915 - 2008 (Tribune) Noted ornithologist dies at 92 Flycatcher specialist went on field trips to collect specimens in the jungles of Africa and Latin America By Trevor Jensen | Tribune reporter February 20, 2008 Melvin A. Traylor Jr. did pioneering work in classifying dozens of birds collected during monthlong treks through the deepest jungles of Africa and Latin America on behalf of the Field Museum. A one-eyed ornithologist as a result of an injury suffered in World War II in the battle for Tarawa, Mr. Traylor's lifelong association with the Field Museum included many years as curator of ornithology and chairman of zoology. Mr. Traylor, 92, died of natural causes Monday, Feb. 11, in the King Home in Evanston, said his stepdaughter, Melissa Sharp Leasia. The son of a prominent Chicago banker, Mr. Traylor started bird-watching as a boy. He made his first collecting expedition on behalf of the Field Museum, a camping trip through the Yucatan, as a volunteer shortly after graduating from Harvard with a biology degree in 1937. The museum liked his work and enlisted Mr. Traylor's help in collecting birds on a privately sponsored expedition to the Galapagos Islands. Along the way the team stopped in Havana, and after one booze-soaked night enjoyed a lunch with author Ernest Hemingway, according to an entry in the meticulous journals Mr. Traylor kept throughout his life. As U.S. participation in World War II loomed, Mr. Traylor enlisted in the Marine Corps and shipped out to the South Pacific. He was awarded a Silver Star for conspicuous gallantry in the landing at Guadalcanal. In 1943, he lost his left eye during fierce fighting on the atoll of Tarawa. Cleared from battle duty, he returned to the Pacific to do research on wind and waves that was deemed crucial to Navy operations for the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. After the war, he was among witnesses to the atomic bomb tests at Bikini atoll, his stepdaughter said. He wrote in his journal of the mushroom cloud and how "it didn't seem impressive till you realized we were 80 miles away." Part of a bygone era of "gentleman scientists," he continued to do volunteer work for the Field until joining the museum's staff in 1956, when he became an assistant curator. His specialty was flycatchers, a bird family of seemingly infinite variety. His expeditions took him to Angola, Sudan and what is now Zimbabwe, as well as throughout Latin America. Hundreds of birds he collected on these trips remain laid out in drawers at the Field Museum for inspection by future scientists. He documented differences among birds, often based on geographic distribution, and was the first to classify dozens of the winged creatures. He had six birds and two bird lice named after him. He also compiled, with Raymond Paynter of Harvard's Museum of Comparative Zoology, a series of gazetteers that detail where ornithological research has been done in South America. "They basically provide blueprints to where people have and haven't been," said John Bates, chairman of the zoology department at the Field Museum. "His contributions were ornithological collections from around the world and scientific journals describing these collections," Bates said. "These collections form the basis of efforts to understand and preserve these birds." Mr Traylor grew up in Chicago's South Shore neighborhood and on the North Side. He attended Parker Academy in Chicago and Milton Academy in Milton, Mass. His father was born in a Kentucky log cabin and went on to become president of the First National Bank of Chicago. In 1932, his name was among those bandied about for the presidential nomination. Mr, Traylor was often wore khakis, flannel shirts and a bolo tie. He was modest about his accomplishments, and stories often came to light with an offhand comment to a grandchild such as, "Oh, I met Ernest Hemingway one time." "He was such an interesting mix of a gentleman raised in great privilege and a Marine who went on these rugged and primitive camping trips for months at a time," his stepdaughter said. Mr. Traylor continued to do research at the Field for many years after his retirement in 1980, and in 2001, with Paynter, was awarded the Elliot Coues Award by the American Ornithologists' Union, one of the highest honors in the field.
"Maybe I should follow you around and smartify everything you say." "in barlight she looked allright, in daylight she looked desperate." "I'm gonna shower in that shit"

#1174 Rob Gordon

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Posted 20 February 2008 - 02:21 PM

I heard that Jim Jones of Pere Ubu died early this morning.


Wow...yeah...just found this on the Daily Swarm

Pere Ubu guitarist Jim Jones died late Monday night. Details have not been released, but he’d been ill for years. Health problems lead him to leave the Cleveland post-punk band in 1996, and his condition had deteriorated, though friends say he’d looked good over the last year.

“Jimmy was the one guy who always got along with everybody,” says John Thompson, the former Discodrome record-shop owner, who was also part of Ubu’s tour support. “Everybody in the music scene knew him and loved him.”

Ubu Projex:

James E. Jones, b. 1950 in Cleveland, Ohio. Graduated from Mayfield High School in 1968. He played baritone sax in the MHS Marching Band, alto sax in the concert band, and discovered an affinity for tape manipulation while in charge of the high school language lab. Jim attempted two quarters at Cuyahoga Community College in ‘69, but his interest in music won out. He formed the short-lived band, Lazarus, and worked as a clerk/buyer for Leo Mintz’s Record Rendezvous retail chain for the next fifteen years. Jim started his own record shop, Platter-Puss Records, in ‘84. He sold the business in ‘87 after joining Pere Ubu. Jim got his first guitar in 1965, and taught himself to play in a self-devised open tuning. He was/is profoundly moved by music in nearly all forms, especially Indian music (thanks to George Harrison), 20th century classical & experimental, 50’s thru 60’s pop and mood music, and of course “rock” in it’s many forms. Jim joined local “underground” band, Mirrors, in ‘74 as bass player. Mirrors shared gigs with Rocket From The Tombs and The Electric Eels (whom he later recorded with), and later transformed into The Styrenes. In ‘77 Jim quit The Styrenes and took some time off from work to become a member of the Pere Ubu road crew, doing the infamous Co-Ed Jail Tours of the US & Europe in support of The Modern Dance lp. Back from the tours Jim and fellow roadie, Pat Ryan, started a two-man experimental rock band called Foreign Bodies, which released a single. The next few years saw Jim honing his skills as a studio producer for a number of local Cleveland artists and bands, recording his own music, and composing electronic pieces for local theatre and dance companies. In 1980 Jim formed the raucous Easter Monkeys, and concomitantly became a member of Scott Krauss And Tony Maimone’s project, Home & Garden. Gigs were played and recordings were released by both bands. Having worked with David Thomas And The Pedestrians On The Variations On A Theme album in ‘84, Jim was asked to join David’s latest project, The Wooden Birds, in 1986. A year later that group (with the addition of Scott Krauss) became the revived Pere Ubu. Jim has recorded with the band since that time, but no longer tours. He currently appears and records with local bands Speaker\Cranker, Noble Rot, and KNG NXN as mainly a keyboardist. Jim has overseen operations of the US arm of Ubutique in Cleveland since 1990.
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#1175 Tony

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Posted 22 February 2008 - 02:50 PM

Author of 'The French Connection' dies in Kentucky The Associated Press HOPKINSVILLE, Ky. --The author of "The French Connection" and "The Green Berets" and has died at a western Kentucky hospital. Robert L. Moore Jr. was 82. Moore wrote under the name Robin Moore. "The Green Berets" was published in 1965 and "The French Connection" was published in 1969. Moore moved to Hopkinsville in 2005. The small town in southwestern Kentucky borders Fort Campbell, which is home to a unit of Green Berets. Dennis Monroe with Lamb Funeral Home says Moore died Thursday at Jennie Stuart Medical Center in Hopkinsville after a long illness.

#1176 Moo & Oink

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Posted 23 February 2008 - 11:41 AM

Teo Macero, record producer for the likes of Miles Davis & Charles Mingus has died at the age of 82. Macero started out as a saxophonist for Charles Mingus before becoming a staff producer for Columbia Records. Among the records he produced were Miles Davis' Kind of Blue & Dave Brubeck's Time Out.

#1177 undo

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Posted 26 February 2008 - 10:43 AM

http://www.pitchfork...arry-norman-rip

Often regarded as the "father of Christian rock", long-running music-maker Larry Norman passed away at his Salem, Oregon home early on the morning of Sunday, February 24, according to his official website. He was 60.

Norman first emerged in the 1950s, and signed to Capitol Records in 1966 as part of the group People!, whose debut I Love You (originally titled We Need a Whole Lot More of Jesus, and a Lot Less Rock and Roll) arrived in 1968. Though outwardly Christian, People! would open for such secular giants of the era as the Doors, the Grateful Dead, Janis Joplin, and the Byrds.

Norman soon left People! and embarked on a solo career that would span the ensuing decades. Along the way his sometimes progressive views would draw the ire of more religiously conservative peers. He also won fans from across rock, including Bob Dylan, Pete Townshend, U2, Van Morrison, John Mellencamp, Danielson, and even Frank Black, who joined Norman onstage at a 2005 concert.

The influential singer and songwriter was twice invited to perform at the White House, and was inducted into the Gospel Music Association's Hall of Fame in 2001.

Arena Rock Recording Company has plans to release a Norman retrospective entitled Larry Norman: The Anthology on May 27.

Norman dictated the following message just prior to his death:

I feel like a prize in a box of cracker jacks with God's hand reaching down to pick me up. I have been under medical care for months. My wounds are getting bigger. I have trouble breathing. I am ready to fly home.

My brother Charles is right, I won't be here much longer. I can't do anything about it. My heart is too weak. I want to say goodbye to everyone. In the past you have generously supported me with prayer and finance and we will probably still need financial help.

My plan is to be buried in a simple pine box with some flowers inside. But still it will be costly because of funeral arrangement, transportation to the gravesite, entombment, coordination, legal papers etc. However money is not really what I need, I want to say I love you.

I'd like to push back the darkness with my bravest effort. There will be a funeral posted here on the website, in case some of you want to attend. We are not sure of the date when I will die. Goodbye, farewell, we will meet again.

Goodbye, farewell, we'll meet again
Somewhere beyond the sky.
I pray that you will stay with God
Goodbye, my friends, goodbye.

Larry


#1178 Tony

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Posted 26 February 2008 - 12:37 PM

Paul L. Tilley, 40, managing director of creative at advertising agency DDB, died Friday, Feb. 22. The Wilmette resident apparently jumped from the upper floors of the Fairmont Chicago Hotel early Friday evening, and his death was ruled a suicide by the Cook County medical examiner's office.

Tilley oversaw commercials and campaigns for marquee clients such as Budweiser and McDonald's.

Mr. Tilley was named managing director of creative at DDB in September 2006, nine years after he joined the shop. Over those years, he led creative teams that came up with Dell's "Dude, You're Gettin' a Dell" campaign and advertising in McDonald's "I'm Lovin' It" effort.

Mr. Tilley, 40, died on Friday, Feb. 22. The Wilmette resident apparently jumped from an upper floor of the Fairmont Chicago Hotel Friday, and his death was ruled a suicide by the Cook County medical examiner's office.

#1179 Bob Loblaw

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Posted 26 February 2008 - 12:56 PM

Paul L. Tilley, 40, managing director of creative at advertising agency DDB, died Friday, Feb. 22. The Wilmette resident apparently jumped from the upper floors of the Fairmont Chicago Hotel early Friday evening, and his death was ruled a suicide by the Cook County medical examiner's office.

Tilley oversaw commercials and campaigns for marquee clients such as Budweiser and McDonald's.

Mr. Tilley was named managing director of creative at DDB in September 2006, nine years after he joined the shop. Over those years, he led creative teams that came up with Dell's "Dude, You're Gettin' a Dell" campaign and advertising in McDonald's "I'm Lovin' It" effort.

Mr. Tilley, 40, died on Friday, Feb. 22. The Wilmette resident apparently jumped from an upper floor of the Fairmont Chicago Hotel Friday, and his death was ruled a suicide by the Cook County medical examiner's office.



I'd kill myself too if I came up with the Dell and McD's campaign.

#1180 ParticleHustler

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Posted 26 February 2008 - 01:01 PM

I was about to say...I don't wish death on anyone, but uh, I didn't enjoy those advertising campaigns at all.