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#1401 norton

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 04:06 PM

ASBURY PARK, N.J. - Fortune teller Madam Marie, a figure of rock 'n' roll mythology thanks to Bruce Springsteen, has died. She was in her mid-90s. Sally Castello tells the Asbury Park Press that her great-grandmother, Marie Castello, died Friday. The psychic reader and adviser began telling fortunes on the Asbury Park Boardwalk in New Jersey in the 1930s. Madam Marie became famous in 1973 when Springsteen paid homage to her in the song "4th of July, Asbury Park (Sandy)." His lyric, "Did you hear, the cops finally busted Madam Marie for tellin' fortunes better than they do," cemented her fame.

#1402 Tony

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Posted 02 July 2008 - 04:17 PM

ASBURY PARK, N.J. - Fortune teller Madam Marie, a figure of rock 'n' roll mythology thanks to Bruce Springsteen, has died. She was in her mid-90s.


Sally Castello tells the Asbury Park Press that her great-grandmother, Marie Castello, died Friday. The psychic reader and adviser began telling fortunes on the Asbury Park Boardwalk in New Jersey in the 1930s.

Madam Marie became famous in 1973 when Springsteen paid homage to her in the song "4th of July, Asbury Park (Sandy)."

His lyric, "Did you hear, the cops finally busted Madam Marie for tellin' fortunes better than they do," cemented her fame.



I was going to post this and call your attention to it. :)

#1403 Moo & Oink

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 01:12 PM

Jazz pianist Ronnie Matthews has died at age 72. The jazz greats Ronnie has worked with over the years have included Freddie Hubbard, Art Blakey & Woody Shaw. As a tribute to Ronnie, I wanted to download a clip I've seen of him with Art Blakey & the Jazz Messengers, but it's no longer on YouTube.

#1404 Tony

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 01:28 PM

A former Dallas police officer who bought Jack Ruby the gun ultimately used to kill presidential assassin Lee Harvey Oswald has died. Joe Cody died Saturday in Dallas at the age of 78. He was a friend of Ruby's who took him to a hardware store in 1960 and paid $62.50 for the .38-caliber Colt Cobra revolver and ammunition. The Dallas Morning News reports Ruby was concerned about protecting the profits from his nightclub and had asked Cody about buying a safe. Instead, Cody suggested that Ruby carry the cash in his left pocket and a gun in his right. Cody says he bought the gun for Ruby to help him save money because police officers were exempt from the sales tax on the purchase. The next time Cody saw the gun was on television November 24th, 1963 when Ruby shot Oswald in the Dallas police garage, two days after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

#1405 Tony

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 05:08 PM

Larry Harmon, who appeared as Bozo the Clown for decades and licensed the name to other Bozos around the world, had died at age 83. Harmon died Thursday at his home of congestive heart failure, his longtime publicist, Jerry Digney, told The Associated Press. Although not the first person to play Bozo, Harmon took on the famous clown's persona and, as an entrepreneur, he licensed the character to others, particularly TV stations. Those stations then recruited their own Bozos for local shows. Harmon met his alter ego after answering a casting call to make personal appearances as a clown to promote records. He got the job and eventually bought the rights to Bozo. Along the way, he embellished Bozo's distinctive look: the orange-tufted hair, the bulbous nose, the outlandish red, white and blue costume.

#1406 undo

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Posted 03 July 2008 - 11:14 PM

As a tribute to Ronnie, I wanted to download a clip I've seen of him with Art Blakey & the Jazz Messengers, but it's no longer on YouTube.

Oh well, you tried your best.

#1407 Tony

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 09:40 AM

Jesse Helms, the firebrand U.S. senator whose outspoken, conservative views polarized North Carolina and U.S. voters for decades, died early Friday.

#1408 elcorazon

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 09:53 AM

Jesse Helms, the firebrand U.S. senator whose outspoken, conservative views polarized North Carolina and U.S. voters for decades, died early Friday.

I'll shed no tears for that guy.
Sail Away: The Songs of Randy Newman -7.5/10
Dusty Springfield - Dusty in Memphis 8.5/10
Buddy & Julie Miller - Written in Chalk wow, first listen, but great great record! 9.3/10
Justin Townes Earle - Midnight at the Moviessurprisingly great, never picked up his past releases, but this one's knocking my socks off right away, 8.7/10
M. Ward - Hold Time 8.0/10
Neko Case -Middle Cyclone her best I've heard is my initial impression, but too soon to rate, haven't had a really good listen yet 7.8/10

#1409 velocity

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Posted 04 July 2008 - 12:28 PM

Your gravity has stifled my celebratory jig.

#1410 zolacolby

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Posted 05 July 2008 - 09:55 AM

Jesse Helms, the firebrand U.S. senator whose outspoken, conservative views polarized North Carolina and U.S. voters for decades, died early Friday.

I hope he suffered greatly in his final months...
"Maybe I should follow you around and smartify everything you say." "in barlight she looked allright, in daylight she looked desperate." "I'm gonna shower in that shit"

#1411 Tony

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Posted 06 July 2008 - 08:51 PM

Rumors flying that writer Thomas M. Disch committed suicide.

#1412 birdistheword

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Posted 06 July 2008 - 10:16 PM

Rumors flying that writer Thomas M. Disch committed suicide.


http://locusmag.com/...Disch_Obit.html

#1413 Agrimorfee

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 08:37 AM

Don S. Davis, 65; actor had roles on 'Stargate: SG-1,' 'Twin Peaks' From a (L.A.) Times Staff Writer July 8, 2008 Don S. Davis, a college professor who found a second career as a character actor, gaining notice for his roles in TV's "Stargate: SG-1" and "Twin Peaks," died of a heart attack June 29 at his home in Gibsons, Canada. He was 65. Davis was teaching theater arts at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver in the early 1980s when he decided to pursue acting as a profession. A native of the Missouri Ozarks who had served in the U.S. Army, Davis drew upon those experiences in his frequent portrayals of authority figures on television and film. He had a regular role as Gen. George S. Hammond on the science-fiction TV series "Stargate: SG-1" from 1997 to 2006 and a recurring role as Maj. Garland Briggs on the quirky "Twin Peaks" in the early '90s. He also appeared periodically as Scully's father in "The X-Files" TV series about FBI agents investigating unsolved cases. Related STORY: Hollywood A-Z: Don S. Davis"I like sci-fi because it's really one of the last places or genres that has clearly defined good and evil, and it's a place where you can have heroes without them having to be overly flawed," Davis told the Press of Christchurch, New Zealand, last year. Among Davis' small but memorable film roles were Charlie Collins, coach of the Racine Belles women's professional baseball team in "A League of Their Own" (1992), and Everett Bainbridge, a Mayflower Kennel Club Dog Show judge in "Best in Show" (2000). Don Sinclair Davis was born Aug. 4, 1942, in Aurora, Mo. He studied physical education and art at Southwest Missouri State College but changed his major to theater and art after working in the scene shop designing sets for plays. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1965. He had joined the Army ROTC to pay his way through college and served in Korea for three years, attaining the rank of captain. After fulfilling his military obligation, he enrolled in Southern Illinois University, earning a master's in theater in 1970 and a doctorate in 1982. He taught at Southern Illinois before moving to Vancouver. He left the academic world for full-time acting in 1987 and retired in 2007 because of a heart condition. Davis is survived by his wife, Ruby Fleming-Davis, a costumer, and his son, Matthew, from a previous marriage.

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#1414 Agrimorfee

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 08:38 AM

Jesse Helms, the firebrand U.S. senator whose outspoken, conservative views polarized North Carolina and U.S. voters for decades, died early Friday.

I hope he suffered greatly in his final months...


Here's a proper memoriam from Todd Rundgren...


"Is everyone on here just an act sometimes?"--Hummingbird

Read all of my stupid song parodies here. Latest song improved/ruined: "No More Mr. Nice Guy" by Alice Cooper.

 

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#1415 Rob Gordon

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Posted 08 July 2008 - 08:42 AM

Don S. Davis, 65; actor had roles on 'Stargate: SG-1,' 'Twin Peaks'
From a (L.A.) Times Staff Writer
July 8, 2008


Don S. Davis, a college professor who found a second career as a character actor, gaining notice for his roles in TV's "Stargate: SG-1" and "Twin Peaks," died of a heart attack June 29 at his home in Gibsons, Canada. He was 65.

Davis was teaching theater arts at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver in the early 1980s when he decided to pursue acting as a profession.

A native of the Missouri Ozarks who had served in the U.S. Army, Davis drew upon those experiences in his frequent portrayals of authority figures on television and film. He had a regular role as Gen. George S. Hammond on the science-fiction TV series "Stargate: SG-1" from 1997 to 2006 and a recurring role as Maj. Garland Briggs on the quirky "Twin Peaks" in the early '90s. He also appeared periodically as Scully's father in "The X-Files" TV series about FBI agents investigating unsolved cases.

Related
STORY: Hollywood A-Z: Don S. Davis"I like sci-fi because it's really one of the last places or genres that has clearly defined good and evil, and it's a place where you can have heroes without them having to be overly flawed," Davis told the Press of Christchurch, New Zealand, last year.

Among Davis' small but memorable film roles were Charlie Collins, coach of the Racine Belles women's professional baseball team in "A League of Their Own" (1992), and Everett Bainbridge, a Mayflower Kennel Club Dog Show judge in "Best in Show" (2000).

Don Sinclair Davis was born Aug. 4, 1942, in Aurora, Mo. He studied physical education and art at Southwest Missouri State College but changed his major to theater and art after working in the scene shop designing sets for plays. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1965.

He had joined the Army ROTC to pay his way through college and served in Korea for three years, attaining the rank of captain. After fulfilling his military obligation, he enrolled in Southern Illinois University, earning a master's in theater in 1970 and a doctorate in 1982. He taught at Southern Illinois before moving to Vancouver. He left the academic world for full-time acting in 1987 and retired in 2007 because of a heart condition.

Davis is survived by his wife, Ruby Fleming-Davis, a costumer, and his son, Matthew, from a previous marriage.


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#1416 Tony

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 09:15 PM

Evelyn Keyes, who played Scarlett O'Hara's younger sister Suellen in "Gone With the Wind" and counted director John Huston and bandleader Artie Shaw among her famous husbands, has died. She was 91. The actress died July 4 of uterine cancer at her home in Montecito, near Santa Barbara, producer and close friend Allan Glaser said Friday. Glaser said the news was withheld because lawyers wanted to wait until the death certificate was filed. Keyes' personal life often overshadowed her acting career. Besides her often turbulent marriages to Shaw and directors Huston and Charles Vidor, she lived with the flamboyant producer Mike Todd for three years during his preparation and filming of "Around the World in 80 Days." She played a cameo role in the movie and helped on publicity. Todd sent her to the premiere in Caracas, then called her abruptly from Paris with this message: "Listen, I have to tell you. I've fallen in love with Elizabeth (Taylor)." "Oh well, nothing lasts forever," she philosophized in 1977. "The good part was that I invested all my money in `Around the World in 80 Days,' and that set me up for life." Keyes gave a frank account of her romances and marriages in her 1977 autobiography, "Scarlett O'Hara's Younger Sister." Her role in the 1939 classic led to a contract at Columbia Pictures and stardom. Among her notable roles: as Robert Montgomery's lover in "Here Comes Mr. Jordan" (1941), the Ruby Keeler role as Al Jolson's wife in "The Jolson Story" (1946), and as Dick Powell's wife in "Mrs. Mike" (1949). She also starred in B pictures that were later praised by movie critics as prime examples of film noir: "Johnny O'Clock" (1947), "The Killer That Stalked New York" (1950), "The Prowler" (1951), "99 River Street" (1953) and "The Big Combo" (1955). Keyes' marriages and divorces made her the darling of gossip columns and fan magazines. Her first marriage, to a handsome Englishman and heavy drinker named Barton Bainbridge, ended in headlines when he fatally shot himself during a separation. Vidor, a handsome Hungarian who directed her first Columbia film, "The Lady in Question," became romantically involved with Keyes, though both were married at the time. When her husband committed suicide and Vidor's wife, actress Karen Morley, divorced him, Vidor and Keyes married. The marriage ended two years later when she discovered he was unfaithful to her as well. Husband No. 3 was Huston. She was impressed when they met at a Hollywood dinner party, and more impressed when he took her afterward to his Tarzana horse ranch and made no effort to seduce her. Their marriage in 1946 led to an adventurous life. Just one of the examples she recalled in 1971 involved Huston returning home from the 1949 film "We Were Strangers," with a gift from actress Jennifer Jones, a pet chimpanzee. "The chimp fell in love with John, and he brought it home to live with us in our all-white apartment." David Niven wrote in his memoir "Bring on the Empty Horses" that Keyes became exasperated at the non-housebroken animal and issued an ultimatum: "One of us has to go. It's the monkey or me." According to Niven, Huston replied, "Honey, it's you." Keyes reported in her own memoir that it was the chimp that got the boot. The Huston marriage did end in 1950, however, and Keyes sought analysis to recover from the failure. Her conclusion: "I was always looking for the same man a strong father figure." Keyes' marriage to Shaw in 1957 seemed to follow the same pattern. He had given up his brilliant career as a clarinetist and bandleader and had been seeking intellectual challenges. Shaw played Henry Higgins to her Eliza Doolittle, giving her a new name, Keri, introducing her to literature and leading her on his world travels. For a time they lived in Spain. After several years she tired of his dominance and they separated. They divorced in 1985. After Shaw died in 2004 at age 94, she battled in court for a share of his estate, saying he had promised it to her. A jury backed her in 2006, but the executor of the estate vowed to appeal. Keyes was born in Port Arthur, Texas, in 1916, according to state birth records; some references give a later year. She grew up fatherless and poor in Atlanta. A glowing blond beauty with an alluring figure, she danced in nightclubs and at 17 set out for Hollywood. Cecil B. DeMille signed her to a seven-year contract and cast her in "The Buccaneer." After a few minor roles at Paramount, she appeared in "Gone With the Wind" and then moved to Columbia, where her career blossomed. After her film career and marriages ended, she turned author, producing an autobiographical novel, "I Am a Billboard," two memoirs, "Scarlett O'Hara's Younger Sister" and "I'll Think About It Tomorrow," film scripts and articles. Keyes took a frank view of her life and career in a 1999 interview: "To become a big movie star like Joan Crawford you need to wear blinders and pay single-minded attention to your career. Nobody paid attention to me, including me. I was the original Cinderella girl, looking for the happy ending in the fairy story. But my fantasy prince never came."

#1417 velocity

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 11:50 PM

Jesse Helms, the firebrand U.S. senator whose outspoken, conservative views polarized North Carolina and U.S. voters for decades, died early Friday.

I hope he suffered greatly in his final months...


Here's a proper memoriam from Todd Rundgren...

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That settles it, I'm seeing him the next time he passes through town. His voice is amazingly unspoiled!

#1418 Tony

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Posted 12 July 2008 - 08:13 AM

Tony Snow, a conservative writer and commentator who cheerfully sparred with reporters in the White House briefing room during a stint as President Bush's press secretary, died Saturday of colon cancer. He was 53. "America has lost a devoted public servant and a man of character," President Bush said in a statement from Camp David, where he was spending the weekend. "It was a joy to watch Tony at the podium each day. He brought wit, grace, and a great love of country to his work." Snow, who served as the first host of the television news program "Fox News Sunday" from 1996 to 2003, would later say that in the Bush administration he was enjoying "the most exciting, intellectually aerobic job I'm ever going to have." Snow was working for Fox News Channel and Fox News Radio when he replaced Scott McClellan as press secretary in May 2006 during a White House shake-up. Unlike McClellan, who came to define caution and bland delivery from the White House podium, Snow was never shy about playing to the cameras. With a quick-from-the-lip repartee, broadcaster's good looks and a relentlessly bright outlook if not always a command of the facts he became a popular figure around the country to the delight of his White House bosses. He served just 17 months as press secretary, a tenure interrupted by his second bout with cancer. In 2005 doctors had removed his colon and he began six months of chemotherapy. In March 2007 a cancerous growth was removed from his abdominal area and he spent five weeks recuperating before returning to the White House. "All of us here at the White House will miss Tony, as will the millions of Americans he inspired with his brave struggle against cancer," Bush said. Snow resigned as Bush's chief spokesman last September, citing not his health but a need to earn more than the $168,000 a year he was paid in the government post. In April, he joined CNN as a commentator. As press secretary, Snow brought partisan zeal and the skills of a seasoned performer to the task of explaining and defending the president's policies. During daily briefings, he challenged reporters, scolded them and questioned their motives as if he were starring in a TV show broadcast live from the West Wing. Critics suggested that Snow was turning the traditionally informational daily briefing into a personality-driven media event short on facts and long on confrontation. He was the first press secretary, by his own accounting, to travel the country raising money for Republican candidates. Although a star in conservative politics, as a commentator he had not always been on the president's side. He once called Bush "something of an embarrassment" in conservative circles and criticized what he called Bush's "lackluster" domestic policy. Most of Snow's career in journalism involved expressing his conservative views. After earning a bachelor's degree in philosophy from Davidson College in North Carolina in 1977 and studying economics and philosophy at the University of Chicago, he wrote editorials for The Greensboro (N.C.) Record, and The Virginian-Pilot in Norfolk. He was the editorial page editor of The Newport News (Va.) Daily Press and deputy editorial page editor of The Detroit News before moving to Washington in 1987 to become editorial page editor of The Washington Times. Snow left journalism in 1991 to join the administration of the first President Bush as director of speechwriting and deputy assistant to the president for media affairs. He then rejoined the news media to write nationally syndicated columns for The Detroit News and USA Today during much of the Clinton administration. Roger Ailes, chairman of Fox News, called Snow a "renaissance man." Robert Anthony Snow was born June 1, 1955, in Berea, Ky., and spent his childhood in the Cincinnati area. Survivors include his wife, Jill Ellen Walker, whom he married in 1987, and three children.

#1419 Tony

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Posted 12 July 2008 - 08:16 AM

Dr. Michael Ellis DeBakey, internationally acclaimed as the father of modern cardiovascular surgery and considered by many to be the greatest surgeon ever died Friday night at The Methodist Hospital in Houston. He was 99. Methodist officials said DeBakey died of natural causes. They gave no additional details. Medical statesman, chancellor emeritus of Baylor College of Medicine, and a surgeon at The Methodist Hospital since 1949, DeBakey trained thousands of surgeons over several generations, achieving legendary status decades before his death. During his career, he estimated he had performed more than 60,000 operations. His patients included the famous Russian President Boris Yeltsin and movie actress Marlene Dietrich among them and the uncelebrated. "Dr. DeBakey singlehandedly raised the standard of medical care, teaching and research around the world," said Dr. George Noon, a cardiovascular surgeon and longtime partner of DeBakey's. "He was the greatest surgeon of the 20th century, and physicians everywhere are indebted to him for his contributions to medicine." Debakey almost died in 2006, when he suffered an aortic aneurysm, a condition for which he pioneered the treatment. He is considered the oldest patient to have both undergone and survived surgery for it. He recovered well enough to go to Washington earlier this year to receive the Congressional Gold Medal, one of the nation's two highest civilian honors. He remained vigorous and was a player in medicine well into his 90s, performing surgeries, traveling and publishing articles in scientific journals. His large hands were steady, his hearing sharp. His personal health regimen included taking the stairs at work and a single cup of coffee in the morning.

#1420 Tony

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Posted 12 July 2008 - 08:36 AM

Charles H. Joffe, a legendary manager of comic talent who helped guide the careers of Dick Cavett, Robin Williams, Billy Crystal and Woody Allen and co-produced nearly all of Allen's films, died Wednesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles after a long illness. He was 78. Joffe and his business partner, Jack Rollins, were considered the deans of comedy management, who nurtured many young comics through their small New York City agency. According to Allen biographer Eric Lax, Rollins and Joffe were the first to bring Lenny Bruce to New York and helped develop the team of Mike Nichols and Elaine May. ...Charles Joffe holds the Best Picture Oscar awarded to "Annie Hall," which he co-produced. Joffe was a legendary talent manager of comics and co-produced nearly all of Woody Allen's films. With him are actor Jack Nicholson, center, and "Annie Hall" co-producer Jack Hollins. They signed Allen when he was writing comedy sketches for others and nudged him into the spotlight to perform his own material, helping him find success as a stand-up comic before he broke into films. It was Joffe who brokered Allen's first movie deal, to write and play a part in the 1965 box-office hit "What's New Pussycat?" He began producing Allen's films in 1969 with "Take the Money and Run," the first movie Allen wrote and directed. Joffe's prowess as a negotiator helped Allen gain total artistic control over his movies. According to Lax, Williams called Joffe "the Beast," a nickname that paid tribute to Joffe's "ability to stand up to studio and network moneymen and make almost unbelievably lucrative deals for his clients." "He was a fabulous deal maker. That was his real strength," said his wife, Carol Joffe. He is also survived by two daughters, Suzanne Joffe and Nicole Holofcener; a son, Cory; his stepmother, Esther Joffe; and three grandchildren, all of Los Angeles. Joffe was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., on July 16, 1929. He entered talent management as a booker of bands while a journalism student at Syracuse University. He worked briefly for the MCA talent agency before joining Rollins in 1953. He and Rollins remained partners through the late 1980s, when they each decided to focus on a single client. Rollins became an executive producer for David Letterman while Joffe mainly handled Allen and produced his films. He also produced some television shows, including movies for Showtime and NBC. Joffe is listed as co-executive producer on Allen's upcoming release, "Vicky Cristina Barcelona," a comedy starring Penelope Cruz and Scarlett Johansson. It was Joffe's 42nd project with the nebbish filmmaker. He picked up the Best Picture Oscar for Allen's "Annie Hall" at the 1978 Academy Awards while Allen, a devoted clarinetist, stayed in New York to play the clarinet with his New Orleans-style jazz band.