Jump to content


Photo

Dead Thread


  • Please log in to reply
1775 replies to this topic

#1461 Tony

Tony

    Hipster

  • Sombie
  • PipPipPip
  • 4238 posts

Posted 11 August 2008 - 10:15 AM

Has Tony just had a massive erection all weekend



I don't root for people to die! I just convey the information. For instance, Paul Newman has weeks to live and I'm not the least bit happy.

#1462 yancy

yancy

    Golden God

  • Sombie
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 20240 posts

Posted 11 August 2008 - 02:50 PM

Posted Image

#1463 yancy

yancy

    Golden God

  • Sombie
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 20240 posts

Posted 11 August 2008 - 02:51 PM



#1464 yancy

yancy

    Golden God

  • Sombie
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 20240 posts

Posted 11 August 2008 - 02:53 PM

Posted Image

#1465 yancy

yancy

    Golden God

  • Sombie
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 20240 posts

Posted 11 August 2008 - 02:54 PM



#1466 yancy

yancy

    Golden God

  • Sombie
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 20240 posts

Posted 11 August 2008 - 02:55 PM

Posted Image

#1467 yancy

yancy

    Golden God

  • Sombie
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 20240 posts

Posted 11 August 2008 - 02:56 PM



#1468 Tony

Tony

    Hipster

  • Sombie
  • PipPipPip
  • 4238 posts

Posted 11 August 2008 - 02:57 PM

Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image

#1469 yancy

yancy

    Golden God

  • Sombie
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 20240 posts

Posted 11 August 2008 - 02:59 PM

Posted Image

#1470 yancy

yancy

    Golden God

  • Sombie
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 20240 posts

Posted 11 August 2008 - 03:02 PM

Posted Image

#1471 yancy

yancy

    Golden God

  • Sombie
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 20240 posts

Posted 11 August 2008 - 03:04 PM

Posted Image

#1472 yancy

yancy

    Golden God

  • Sombie
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 20240 posts

Posted 11 August 2008 - 03:07 PM

Posted Image

#1473 Tony

Tony

    Hipster

  • Sombie
  • PipPipPip
  • 4238 posts

Posted 14 August 2008 - 09:52 AM

Jack A. Weil, the oldest working CEO in America and patriarch of a LoDo clothing company that put the snap in western wear, died Wednesday night at the age of 107. Weil died at home surrounded by members of his family, said his oldest grandson, Steve. A service is scheduled for Sunday at Temple Emanuel, but a time has not been set. Since founding the Rockmount Ranch Wear Manufacturing Company in 1946, "Papa Jack" Weil and his company have been a fixture in lower downtown. He saw value in the former warehouse district long before it became fashionable as LoDo. With his cowboy hat, a folksy manner and his favorite greeting "Where you from?" he would welcome everyone from truck drivers to celebrities like Elvis Presley, Bob Dylan, Robert Redford and Eric Clapton. They all got the same friendly treatment, said Steve Weil, who went to work for his grandfather full-time in the 1980s. Status never matter. "He didn't care about what you were, he cared about who you were," his grandson said. His death comes about eight months after his son, Jack B. Weil died. Until a few weeks ago, the eldest Weil was a fixture in the store on a part of Wazee Street that the city renamed "Jack A. Weil Boulevard" when he turned 100. Each day, he would put in about four hours at the store serving as the official greeter before heading for lunch with his son at the Denver Athletic Club. For many years, his grandfather was "kind of the family secret," Steve Weil said, someone his family admired and loved. But in recent years, he became the face of the company and later a memorable symbol for the city itself. He was featured on billboards and videos created by the Denver Metro Convention & Visitors Bureau. "He was part of our brand. He's part of what makes Denver the West," Mayor John Hickenlooper said, who remembered Weil for his entrepreneurial spirit and ceaseless optimism. "He was somebody who just by being in the room helped everyone feel better," said Hickenlooper, who remembered first meeting "Jack A." back in 1987, when he asked him to sign a petition for a liquor license for what became the Wynkoop Brewing Co. Hickenlooper remembered Weil being skeptical of the idea of opening a restaurant in what had been a warehouse district, but on his grandson's recommendation he signed the petition. "He believed in self-reliance, but also in the value of community," Hickenlooper said, recalling the care Weil took in his business relations with the retailers who sold his western wear. Andrew Hudson, who got to know Weil better while serving as spokesman for former Mayor Wellington Webb, said the 107-year-old businessman's influence went far beyond LoDo. "He was an icon," Hudson said. "He believed in business ethics long before it became a buzzword." Hudson said his own life was influenced by Weil. At one point, Hudson was one of several finalists for a spokesman's job with Wal-Mart. But after thinking of the mega-corporation's impact on mom-and-pop businesses, and also thinking of Weil, Hudson said he withdrew from consideration for the job. Westword Editor Patricia Calhoun recalled meeting Jack A. Weil back in the 1970s when Westword's offices were located near Rockmount. "He was just funny as anything and really created a tremendous legacy in this town. She enjoyed seeing him every St. Patrick's Day in McCormick's restaurant. "He always had a twinkle in his eye and told these great jokes, usually at the expense of Democrats," she recalled. It probably would have tickled him to see Democrats buying his shirts during the convention later this month, she said. Stewart Patton, the doorman at the Oxford Hotel got to know Weil after helping him into a car one day. "He said, 'Where you from?'" And I said, 'Oh a little town in Indiana you probably never heard of," "Try me," Weil answer. "Poseyville, Indiana," Patton said. "Poseyville? That's seven miles from Harmony. My brother and I used to herd cattle through there in 1918. Thereafter, Weil would always say howdy to Patton, and then, with a twinkle in his eye, added, "do you believe he didn't think I knew where Poseyville was." Weil was born March 28, 1901 in Evansville, IN, where his father Abraham, who lived until 90, was a cattleman. During a labor shortage in World War I, Weil went to work after school in the DS Bernstein Overall Factory, where he began a lifetime of learning in the apparel manufacturing business. When he started Rockmount, Weil became what his grandson called "the Henry Ford" of western shirts by inventing the sawtooth pocket and diamond snap design. Weil is survived by his daughter Jane Romberg of Steamboat Springs and by five grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren.

#1474 Tony

Tony

    Hipster

  • Sombie
  • PipPipPip
  • 4238 posts

Posted 14 August 2008 - 01:40 PM

Blink-182 and Morrissey producer Jerry Finn has been taken off life support after suffering a massive brain hemorrhage last month. According to a post on the Prosoundweb forum reprinted on Morrissey- Solo.com, Finn's family made the decision on Saturday. "Even though he did make snail-like improvement these past 31 days, he is not any better for words and has not had any consistency in the tests that the medical team have done for him," a close Finn friend wrote on the forum. "At this time the hemorrhage has done massive damage to his body which will leave him severely disabled and in need of acute care for the rest of his life. We know Jerry wouldn't want to live like this in a vegetative state." Finn, 38, got his start as an engineer in the early 1990s before shifting into production on such albums as Rancid's "...And Out Come the Wolves." Among his best-known production credits are Blink-182's "Enema of the State" and Morissey's "You Are the Quarry." Finn has also worked with Green Day, Bad Religion, Sparta, AFI and the Offspring, among many others. Finn had also lent production to Morrissey's upcoming "Years of Refusal," which has been bumped from a fall release to Feb. 2, 2009, according to Truetoyou.net.

#1475 Moo & Oink

Moo & Oink

    Newbie

  • Sombie
  • PipPip
  • 817 posts

Posted 14 August 2008 - 04:45 PM

Has Tony just had a massive erection all weekend

But this board does have a raging hard-on for the dead guy who played in the gay cowboy movie.

#1476 Tony

Tony

    Hipster

  • Sombie
  • PipPipPip
  • 4238 posts

Posted 15 August 2008 - 11:20 AM

Music industry legend Jerry Wexler, who kick-started his career as a Billboard journalist in the late 1940s and went on to cultivate the careers of Ray Charles, Aretha Franklin and Led Zeppelin while a partner at Atlantic Records, has died at the age of 91 at his home in Siesta Key, Fla. Wexler was born on Jan. 10, 1917, into a Jewish family in the Bronx. After graduating from the school now known as Kansas State University and spending a stint in the Army, he was hired in 1947 at BMI, writing continuity copy for radio stations and plugging the organization's songs. Later that year a friend recommended him to Billboard, where he was hired with a starting pay of $75 a week. At Billboard, Wexler invented the term "rhythm & blues" to replace the name "race records," which was then the name of the chart tracking such music. He stayed at Billboard until 1951, when he went to work for Big Three, the music publishing arm of MGM Records. The following year, Atlantic Records tried to recruit him, but Wexler said he would only join if he was made a partner, and nothing happened. A year later, when co-founder Herb Abramson joined the Army, Atlantic came back with another offer and this time agreed to take him in as a partner. Atlantic had already established itself as an up-and-coming R&B label thanks to hits from artists like Ruth Brown, Joe Turner, Stick McGhee and the Clovers, with the just-signed Ray Charles waiting in the wings. If Atlantic founders Abramson and Ahmet and Nesuhi Ertegun led the way into exploring rhythm and blues, it would be Wexler who ultimately led the label deep into Southern soul. In 1965, he signed a distribution deal for Memphis-based Satellite Records, which was putting out songs by Carla Thomas. That label would later become known as Stax. Before long, Stax began a golden era of hits from Wilson Pickett, Sam & Dave, Otis Redding, Eddie Floyd and William Bell, among others. Before long, Wexler had begun using FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, Ala., as a home base for sessions. "More than any other locale or individual, Muscle Shoals changed my life -- musically and every which way," Wexler wrote in his 1994 autobiography, "Rhythm & the Blues: A Life in American Music." The first artist he brought to Muscle Shoals was Aretha Franklin, whose 1967 debut, "I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You," redefined soul music. As the '60s wore on, Wexler grew more involved with producing and much less with running Atlantic, although he was still closely involved in signing Led Zeppelin, the J. Geils Band and Donnie Hathaway. He left Atlantic for good in 1975, but resurfaced two years later returned as VP of A&R for Warner Bros. Records. In his autobiography, Wexler says that with the help of Karen Berg, they signed the B-52's, Dire Straits and Gang Of Four. During the latter half of the 1970s, Wexler produced Etta James' "Deep in the Night," Bob Dylan's Christian album, "Slow Train Coming," Kim Carnes "Sailin'" and Dire Straits "Communique," among others. Later in life, Wexler was involved with "The Wiz" soundtrack, the Dylan album "Saved" and recordings by a young George Michael, Bill Vera, Lou Ann Barton and Kenny Drew Jr. Funeral details have yet to be announced.

#1477 Rob Gordon

Rob Gordon

    sha la la, man

  • Sombie
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 8663 posts

Posted 15 August 2008 - 12:06 PM

Wexler's passing is a big one for us music folk. I'll have to pull out my Stax box. Should also be noted he produced Dusty In Memphis
Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#1478 Ent

Ent

    Hipster

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1726 posts

Posted 15 August 2008 - 04:26 PM

Posted Image
In this Oct. 17, 1979, file photo, Jerry Wexler, is shown. Wexler, a legendary record producer, who worked with Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles and other greats, has died. He was 91

#1479 birdistheword

birdistheword

    Hipster

  • Sombie
  • PipPipPip
  • 2258 posts

Posted 15 August 2008 - 05:03 PM

Loved this bit about him producing Dylan's Slow Train Coming:

Dylan also approached Jerry Wexler to produce the upcoming sessions...He was familiar with Wexler's celebrated work with Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett, Percy Sledge, Dusty Springfield, and other soul artists. "Synonymous with a small studio in Sheffield, Alabama, the sixties Atlantic recordings of Wexler defined the Muscle Shoals Sound," writes Clinton Heylin. Like Knopfler, when Wexler agreed to produce, he was unaware of the nature of the material that awaited him.

"Naturally, I wanted to do the album in Muscle Shoals - as Bob did - but we decided to prep it in L.A., where Bob lived," recalls Wexler. "That's when I learned what the songs were about: born-again Christians in the old corral...I like the irony of Bob coming to me, the Wandering Jew, to get the Jesus feel...[But] I had no idea he was on this born-again Christian trip until he started to evangelize me. I said, 'Bob, you're dealing with a sixty-two-year-old confirmed Jewish atheist. I'm hopeless. Let's just make an album.'"



#1480 Rob Gordon

Rob Gordon

    sha la la, man

  • Sombie
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 8663 posts

Posted 17 August 2008 - 01:03 PM

Might as well make it SOMB official Singer Ronnie Drew dies after long illness watch Saturday, 16 August 2008 22:21 The President has led tributes to singer Ronnie Drew who has died following a long illness. The President said: 'It is with great sadness that I have learned of the death of the great Irish singer Ronnie Drew'. She said he was a champion of traditional Irish music and with The Dubliners re-energised and refreshened Ireland's unique musical heritage. Advertisement Mrs McAleese said that Mr Drew 'will be greatly missed by many, but most particularly by his family with whom our thoughts are today'. Phelim Drew said his father passed away peacefully in St Vincent's Private hospital this afternoon, aged 73. Mr Drew's family expressed their gratitude to Professor John Crown and the entire staff of the hospital. Drew founded the then Ronnie Drew Group in 1962 which later came to be known as The Dubliners. The group included fellow Irish music legends Luke Kelly, Ciaran Bourke and Barney McKenna. While Kelly was known for singing their soulful ballads, Drew will be best remembered for his gravelly-voiced renditions of rabble-rousing folk songs, like Finnegan's Wake and Dicey Reilly. Drew sang one of the band's biggest commercial hits, when they entered the UK top 10 in 1967 with Seven Drunken Nights and appeared on the BBC's Top of the Pops. In 1995 they appeared once again on the show with Shane McGowan and the Pogues, who performed with Drew on their single The Irish Rover. Born in Dun Laoghaire, Co Dublin, in 1934, Drew underwent six months' treatment for throat cancer two years ago. His wife of more than 40 years, Deirdre, died last year. The couple lived in Greystones, Co Wicklow. He is survived by his two children, Phelim and Cliodhna, and five grandchildren. Tributes flood in for 'iconic singer' The Taoiseach said that the Dubliners singer had been an iconic figure in Irish music over the past five decades and that his unique singing voice had been enjoyed by many people. Mr Cowen added that Mr Drew, whether as part of the Dubliners or during his solo career, will be remembered for his promotion of Irish music both at home and around the globe. The Minister for Arts, Sport and Tourism Martin Cullen, has expressed his sadness on the death of Mr Drew. Mr Cullen described the singer as a truly Dublin icon and part of our modern folk history. He said 'I am sure he will be missed tonight from 'Raglan Road' to Fitzgibbon Street' and in all parts of the city of Dublin which he so romanticised about in his music and song'. Fine Gael leader Enda Kenny said Mr Drew's contribution to Irish music and Irish life was immeasurable and his influence would be felt for many years to come. In a statement on U2's official website, Bono said Drew has left his earthly tour for one of the heavens. 'Music to inspire, to console... an optimism that was contagious... that's what U2 took from The Dubliners,' he said. 'Ronnie has left his earthly tour for one of the heavens... they need him up there... it's a little too quiet and pious. God is lonely for a voice louder than His own.'
Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image