Results for 1959

dijs

Greg

“Well... All Right”Buddy Holly

This week Greg adds a track to the Desert Island Jukebox. He uses his turn at the DIJ to mark the anniversary of the death of Buddy Holly. Holly, along with The Big Bopper and Ritchie Valens died in 1959. It was a momentous date in rock history, and in his short life, Holly was hugely influential. Greg describes how the singer and guitarist laid a blueprint for what we know today as rock and roll. One of Holly's most influential recordings is "Well… All Right," the song Greg chooses to add to the Jukebox. It's an intimate, stripped down production, and as you listen Greg thinks you'll hear the roots of albums like Rubber Soul.

Go to episode 166
world tours

Cuba

Cuba

After stops in countries like South Africa, Japan, and Sweden, the Sound Opinions World Tour is trekking on. Jim and Greg hop over to Cuba, inspired by the historic changes in U.S.-Cuban relations announced recently by President Obama. Their guide to Cuba's influential rhythms is Ned Sublette, author of Cuba and Its Music: From the First Drums to the Mambo. Ned tells us that Cuba has been alive with music ever since the sixteenth century. Drawing upon its unique ethnic history, Cuba developed a polyrhythmic style quite different from what emerged in North America. Innovative artists like Arsenio Rodríguez brought Cuban dance music into maturity during World War II. The unshakeable rhythms of the mambo, rumba, and cha-cha-chá filtered into the United States, particularly in the world of jazzDizzy Gillespie's collaborations with Chano Pozo changed music forever. Rock ‘n’ roll and the blues also adopted Afro-Cuban flavors. Even after Cuba's isolation following the 1959 revolution, the music never stopped, according to Ned. Nueva trova, for example, a movement led by singer-songwriters like Silvio Rodríguez and Pablo Milanés, began to fuse revolutionary politics and idealism with traditional song forms. Cuban rhythms also provided the basis for the global salsa phenomenon of the '70s. Today music in Cuba thrives in both traditional genres and in modern ones like reggaeton. Though he's not personally a fan of the hit 1997 Buena Vista Social Club album, Ned was happy to see North Americans reengage with Cuban artists. With the political changes underway, he expects to see an even more exciting cultural exchange between Cuban musicians and the rest of the world.

Go to episode 482