Results for Cheap Trick

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Cheap Trick

35 years ago some boys from Rockford, IL headed over to Japan to play some shows. Since they didn't have much fame in the U.S., they never expected to be mobbed by 5,000 fans at the airport, a la The Beatles. But, now, of course, Cheap Trick is a household name in its own country. The live recording At Budokan went on to sell over 3 million copies. Cheap Trick members Robin Zander, guitarist Rick Nielsen, bassist Tom Petersson and Nielsen's son Daxx (sitting in for Bun E. Carlos on drums) give us live At Budokan live on Sound Opinions and talk about the decision to travel overseas, meeting idols like Fats Domino and why they are the band that will steal your guitar, but never your girlfriend.

Go to episode 407
reviews
The LatestThe Latest available on iTunes

Cheap Trick The Latest

Rockford, IL's own Cheap Trick have been making music for four decades. So, you wouldn't expect much from them now, right? But, as Jim says, these“geezers”are fierce. He calls them one of the hardest-working bands in show business, and says they still have the goods on stage and in the studio. He gives The Latest a Buy It. Greg hears Cheap Trick taking risks again, and states that any band with Bunny Carlos as drummer is great. He also gives the album a Buy It rating.

JimGreg
Go to episode 190
lists

Hero Worship

Today's theme is Hero Worship. The genesis of this idea was that we here at Sound Opinions started noticing that a lot of artists have written songs about their own heroes. Think of Bob Dylan's "Song To Woody." It's the kind of love only one rocker could express to another. Though when it comes to name-checking important musical figures, critics like Jim and Greg come a close second. Here are their favorite moments of musical Hero Worship.

Go to episode 307

Hero Worship

Without a doubt, musicians influence one another. Sometimes in subtle ways with a borrowed riff or lyric. Sometimes by overtly name-checking another artist. This week, we look at those obvious examples of Hero Worship - songs written about another musican. Think of Bob Dylan's Song to Woody, or David Bowie's Song For Bob Dylan. Jim and Greg picked some tracks from their musical heroes, that mention other musical heroes.

Go to episode 575
rock doctors

Valentine's Day Emergency

Jim and Greg open up the Rock Doctors' clinic for the next segment. They take an appointment with two listeners for a Valentine's Day emergency. Andrew and Kelli are a young couple from Chicago with only one major relationship problem: music. While Andrew is music obsessive, always on the search for something new and underground, Kelli is happy sticking with her favorite radio favorites. And as Andrew points out, for the most part his girlfriend's music is stuck in that dreaded decade: the 70s. Kelli admits to a fondness for bar music like Boston, Styx and Journey, but is open to new stuff as long as it's upbeat and fun. She finds a lot of her boyfriend's tastes (Wilco, Radiohead) to be too cerebral and boring. So, it's Jim and Greg's task to find something they will both enjoy.

Greg prescribes The Latest by Cheap Trick. He knows a lot of people dismiss this band for being cheesy, but he stands behind their smart lyrics, progressive compositions and terrific drumming. It seems like The Latest should be the perfect remedy, however neither Andrew nor Kelli are tremendously fond of it. Surprisingly, this record is even too cheesy for Kelli. And while Andrew admires the band for rocking out so hard for so long, he won't be attending any Cheap Trick shows anytime soon.

Jim prescribes the self-titled debut by La Roux. He loves the British duo's smart electronic pop. Jim didn't see anything like La Roux on either Kelli or Andrew's chart, but thinks radical treatment is necessary. He's right; the couple loves the record. Kelli got her dose of dance music, and Andrew got his artiness. And they won't have to break-up over rock anytime soon.

Go to episode 219
news

Music News

First up in the news this week is a discussion with Dave Frey, manager of the band Cheap Trick. Jim and Greg talk to Frey about the recent lawsuit he and the Rockford natives recently filed against Sony BMG. Cheap Trick, along with the Allman Brothers Band, launched the suit contending that the label has underpaid artists for digital music transactions. Artists currently receive about 4.5 cents per 99-cent download, while the label can receive as much as 70 cents per transaction. Considering that hits like "Surrender" or "Ramblin' Man" were made and paid for decades ago, the split doesn‘t seem very equitable. The reason for this, Frey explains, is that many bands’ contracts were drafted long before digital technology emerged. In fact, CDs are still considered“new media”for Cheap Trick. Therefore, royalty deductions are made to account for outdated“breakages”and“containers.”But until Frey can discern what the container is for an MP3, and how it breaks, he stands by the suit, which is asking for $25 million on behalf of all Sony Music artists.

Fellow rocker Keith Richards has also been in the news. According to reports, the Rolling Stones guitarist suffered a concussion after falling from a palm tree. What he was doing climbing a palm tree is still unknown, but Richards seems to have emerged from this latest accident fairly intact. Jim and Greg muse that this is not the first time the notoriously hard-living Stone was put in harm's way: He has previously broken ribs, punctured a lung, infected a finger, and battled heroin addiction. It seems Greg is correct to compare Richards to a cockroach; nothing can take him out.

Go to episode 23

Music News

Watch this Home Depot ad or this Pizza Hut spot and you might find yourself playing a game of Name That Tune. The Black Keys' Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney are suing these corporations for what they say is their use of“sound alike”tunes - in this case, instrumental tracks that rip off key elements of the band's hits "Lonely Boy" and "Gold on the Ceiling ." The two are seeking $75,000 in damages apiece. We'll have to wait and see if they get it, but this did work for Tom Waits in the eighties…

Tragedy struck the Radiohead tour recently when a stage collapse in Toronto killed a drum tech and injured three others. The collapse continues a disturbing trend of similar accidents last year, notably the Indiana State Fair collapse and a collapse in Ottawa that nearly crushed the members of Cheap Trick. Cheap Trick's near miss motivated them to lobby Congress for greater regulation of the temporary stage industry, but action didn't come soon enough for the Radiohead crew. Now four entities including Live Nation and Radiohead's touring arm are being investigated in the accident. It's been a rough summer for EDM fans too. Two concertgoers died at this month's Electric Daisy Carnival in Las Vegas. The event's promoter, Insomniac Events, denies responsibility for the deaths, which occurred outside festival boundaries. No word yet on whether Las Vegas will take any action.

Go to episode 344

Music News

Chuck D is always“fighting the power.”This time around he's taking on Universal Music in a $100 class-action lawsuit, alleging that the label has short-changed its artists and producers in licensing deals for digital downloads and ringtones. The suit says that artists are entitled to 50% of profits from digital downloads, and that currently Universal is paying out as it would for physical product, giving a lower royalty rate and deducting for physical media charges like containers and packaging. The Public Enemy front man is just one of many artists to take to the courts during this digital music revolution. Eminem recently won a landmark case against Universal, and previously Cheap Trick and the Allman brothers settled a similar suit.

Members of the hip-hop community are mourning the death of rapper Heavy D this week. He died Tuesday at age 44. Jim describes the“Overweight Lover”as larger than life in every way. He wasn't a hardcore rapper, but was full of charm and humor. He also moved over to the film and television worlds, appearing in The Cider House Rules, Tower Heist and Boston Public. To say goodbye to Heavy D, Jim and Greg play his 1991 hit "Now That We Found Love." It was written by Gamble and Huff and recorded by The O'Jays and Third World, but it's Heavy's version we'll always remember.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNWmF3SYzZI&index=1&list=RDcNWmF3SYzZI

Go to episode 311

Music News

At the top of the show Greg tells Jim about his visit to the Future of Music Coalition Policy Summit that ran earlier this week in Washington D.C. The first bit of news concerns copyright legislation, or rather a lack thereof. U.S. Rep. Bob Goodlatte and Maria Pallante, the federal register of copyrights, basically said they were relying on the private sector to combat file-sharing. Technology is just too far ahead of the laws for them to change quickly.

In other FMC news, the band Cheap Trick flew to Washington to lobby Congress for stricter regulations of temporary stages. They experienced one of many stage collapses this summer, which resulted in injuries, and in some cases, deaths. And the band hopes that stages are held to as high a standard of safety as carnival rides or elevators.

Go to episode 306

Music News

Recently Jim and Greg saw a flurry of stories in the“People Will Buy Anything”department. John Lennon's Gretsch 6120 guitar, which he used to record The Beatles' classic "Paperback Writer," was sold to Indianapolis Colts owner Jim Irsay for $530,000. And that's not the only famous guitar up for purchase: Rick Nielsen of Cheap Trick is starting to auction off some pieces from his massive collection of vintage axes. Some of his guitars have reached prices as high as $8,500.

Meanwhile, the secret buyer of Elvis Presley's very first recording has been revealed, and it's none other than Jack White. The Third Man Records honcho paid $300,000 for the 1953 acetate of "My Happiness"/"That's When Your Heartaches Begin" and plans to reissue it on vinyl for Record Store Day.

Those all may sound like worthwhile purchases, if you‘ve got the cash. But the same can’t be said for some other pieces of music memorobilia showing up on the auction block. A plastic bag allegedly full of air from a Kanye West concert reached bids of over $60,000 before eBay shut down the auction. Many copycat listings have followed, including a bag of Ye's flatulence for the bargain price of $5.

Go to episode 486