Results for Corin Tucker

interviews

Top Albums of 2005

The“Best Records”list: It's“a sacred thing”in pop music fandom, says Jim, requiring a discerning ear and laser-like focus. Thankfully, our hosts are here to help. After sifting through hundreds of records, and countless days spent listening (perhaps to the discontent of their wives), they‘ve managed to pick out their absolute favorites. Here’s what Jim and Greg say they'll still be listening to in 2006.

Go to episode 2
genre dissections

Riotgrrrl

Turn that song down…turn the static up! It's time to look back at Riot Grrrl. This feminist punk movement emerged in the early '90s in the Northwest with a confrontational sound and message. Riot Grrrl didn't last long, but its legacy lives on through spin-off bands, as well as the concept of a revolutionary rock chick that has been usurped by everyone from the Spice Girls to Avril Lavigne. To hear more about the history of Riot Grrrl, Jim and Greg talk to Sara Marcus, author of Girls to the Front*. Sara also shares her quintessential Riot Grrrl recordings:

  • Bikini Kill, The C.D. Version of the First Two Records
  • Bikini Kill, New Radio 7"
  • Bratmobile, Pottymouth
  • Heavens to Betsy, These Monsters Are Real 7"
  • Huggy Bear, Taking the Rough with the Smooch

As Sara Marcus explains, the term“Riot Grrrl”often gets thrown around when it comes to any loud lady singer. But the movement is much more specific in terms of time and place. As critics, Jim and Greg have to admit that the music produced by Riot Grrrl bands has not held up as well as the message. But the next generation is a different story. So to wrap-up they play songs by two bands that trace their lineage back to Riot Grrrl.

Greg chooses "I Wanna Be Your Joey Ramone" by Sleater-Kinney. Sleater-Kinney was founded by Corin Tucker, of the Riot Grrrl band Heavens to Betsy and Carrie Brownstein of the queercore band Excuse 17. Jim goes with "Hot Topic," by Le Tigre, the next project from Bikini Kill's Kathleen Hanna.

Go to episode 285

Riot Grrrl

Let's get ready to riot! This week, Jim and Greg celebrate the 25th anniversary of the underground feminist punk movement, Riot Grrrl. It all began in the early '90s in Washington, D.C. and the Pacific Northwest when women united in outrage by speaking out on issues like domestic abuse, reproductive rights, sexual harassment and rape. They conveyed their messages through loud, confrontational punk music, a genre that was notoriously male-dominated.

Jim and Greg revisit an interview from 2011 with Sara Marcus, author of Girls to the Front: The True Story of the Riot Grrrl Revolution. Sara shares the history of the movement as well as her quintessential Riot Grrrl recordings:

  • Bikini Kill, The C.D. Version of the First Two Records
  • Bikini Kill, New Radio 7"
  • Bratmobile, Pottymouth
  • Heavens to Betsy, These Monsters Are Real 7"
  • Huggy Bear, Taking the Rough with the Smooch

Though the initial Riot Grrrl movement came and went quickly, it produced a legion of musicians who continue to produce powerful music. To cap off the show, Greg and Jim play songs by two bands rooted in the Riot Grrrl movement. Greg chooses I Wanna Be Your Joey Ramone by Sleater-Kinney. Sleater-Kinney was founded by Corin Tucker, of the Riot Grrrl band Heavens to Betsy and Carrie Brownstein of the queercore band Excuse 17. Jim goes with Hot Topic by Le Tigre, Kathleen Hanna's second band after Bikini Kill.

Go to episode 547
reviews
InvitationInvitation available on iTunes

Filthy Friends Invitation

The indie rock supergroup Filthy Friends initially formed in 2012 as a cover band. Led by Sleater-Kinney's Corin Tucker and R.E.M.'s Peter Buck, along with Kurt Bloch, Scott McCaughey, and Bill Rieflin, the group has released its debut album of originals, Invitation. Jim is skeptical of all supergroups, but thinks that Filthy Friends gels as a real band. He finds the guitar interplay to be a joy and loves the little allusions the band makes to their musical heroes. Jim calls Invitation a fun ride worthy of a Buy It. Greg, however, finds the album to be a tentative effort. Tucker's vocals are uncharacteristically restrained, he says, and the record lacks any musical surprises. According to Greg, the album is pleasant enough, but he can't imagine listening to it a year from now, so all he can give it is a Try It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 616
No Cities To LoveNo Cities to Love available on iTunes

Sleater-Kinney No Cities to Love

For as long as Sleater-Kinney has been a band, they have been a divisive subject on Sound Opinions. Greg is a fan and Jim is (usually) not. Now, ten years after their indefinite hiatus, we get their latest album No Cities to Love. The band, Portlandia's Carrie Brownstein, Corin Tucker and Janet Weiss, has returned with something to prove, according to Greg. About half the songs of the album are some of the best they have ever done and while the second half isn't quite as good. Despite that, he gives the album a strong Buy It rating. Jim is still on the fence with Sleater-Kinney. He wishes Brownstein and Tucker's vocals had more melody to them, and he isn't hearing much new. Therefore, he gives No Cities to Love a Try It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 478
dijs

Greg

“Dig Me Out”Sleater-Kinney

All girl indie rock group Sleater-Kinney recently announced that following their performance at Lollapalooza this year, they'd be taking an indefinite hiatus. Essentially, this means that the Portland group is breaking up, but reserving the right to reunite should they be inspired (or in debt). Sleater-Kinney is one of Greg's favorite groups. He loves all seven of the group's albums, but thinks they really hit their stride on their third effort, Dig Me Out. This is because singer/guitarists Corin Tucker and Carrie Brownstein were joined by powerful drummer Janet Weiss. Also, there's an inherent tension in the music, which Greg imagines was caused by the demise of Tucker and Brownstein's romantic relationship. So, to say goodbye, Greg is choosing the title track, "Dig Me Out," as his Desert Island Jukebox pick this week.

Go to episode 32