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The news starts with Front Line Management's lawsuit against Axl Rose. Front Line's founder and chief executive is Irving Azoff, who is also executive chairman of Live Nation Entertainment, which merged with Ticketmaster last month. Jim and Greg discuss the impact of such a lawsuit on an artist. Considering the mega-corporation controls ticketing, venues and many other aspects of the industry, they may not be one to tangle with. Also, they note that the lawsuit is over a breach of "oral contract." Who agrees to an oral contract these days? Especially with Axl Rose!

Jim and Greg discuss the yet again delayed emergence of Spotify in the U.S. The Internet music service, introduced in 2008 by Daniel Ek, has become one of the most popular of its kind in Europe with 7 million users. But despite rumors that it would come to the States this summer, Ek is still having trouble navigating our thick legal system. He wants Spotify to be legitimate, and that means a lot of licensing fees. But once it does hit our soil, Greg predicts big success.

It hit about 80 degrees this week in Chicago, and while it may snow again next week, we've got our eye on the summer. Jim and Greg run down some of the biggest music festivals of the season. First up is Coachella this month, which will feature Jay-Z, LCD Soundsystem and Faith No More among others. The following month, music fans can travel to Washington for the Sasquatch Festival to see My Morning Jacket, Kid Cudi and Ween. In June Bonnaroo will host the Dave Matthews Band, Stevie Wonder and Weezer. Two of the biggest festivals are right here in our hometown: Pitchfork Music Festival, which will boast a Pavement reunion, and Lollapalooza, which Greg can nearly confirm will have headliners Lady Gaga, Green Day, and a reunited Soundgarden. But, Jim points out that not all of the best multi-act concerts are destination festivals. Lilith Fair is back this year as a traveling women-fueled act with Mary J. Blige, Cat Power and Kelly Clarkson.

Go to episode 227

Music News

Garth Brooks continues his quest against iTunes with the release of his new digital music platform, GhostTunes. Brooks is notoriously one of the big iTunes holdouts, preferring instead to sell his music on his own website. GhostTunes has music by Garth and a number of other atists. One of the biggest differences between the platform and iTunes is the split of profits (80/20 vs. 70/30). This is just the latest in a string of press for Brooks, who recently returned to the music scene with a new album and sold-out arena shows around the U.S.

Taylor Swift suddenly pulling her music from Spotify has its CEO, Daniel Ek, acting like a jilted lover in one of her tracks. The reigning pop princess argued people should always pay for music, while Ek fired back that Spotify has paid more than $2 billion to artists in royalties. That being said, on average, one stream of a song pays an artist only 7/10 of a penny. Ek believes that people will ultimately just get music for free if they don‘t use services like Spotify. So some money is better than none. Apparently he hasn’t gotten the message that Swift is firm in her stance, and they are never getting back together (like ever.)

Go to episode 468