Results for Davy Jones

specials

The Monkees

Hey, hey it's The Monkees! Jim and Greg go ape on this episode with Eric Lefcowitz, author of Monkee Business: The Revolutionary Made For TV Band. Monkees teen icon Davy Jones died last week at age 66, and so Jim and Greg return to this 2011 conversation. The three men talk about the band's history as a group manufactured to tap into Beatlemania. TV producers Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider brought bandmates Micky Dolenz, Michael Nesmith, Peter Tork and Davy Jones together, and their music was supervised by record producer Don Kirshner. This was the original pop model, giving way to N'Sync, Justin Bieber and Glee. But eventually, as often happens, The Monkees began to itch for independence. They went on to write and produce more of their own music and make the trippy cult classic Head. And of course, there were a number of reunion efforts in later decades. But, for many their legacy remains those wacky TV moments and classic pop songs.

Go to episode 328

The Monkees

Hey, hey, it's The Monkees! Jim and Greg go ape on this episode with Eric Lefcowitz, author of Monkee Business: The Revolutionary Made For TV Band. The three men talk about the band's history as a group manufactured to tap into Beatlemania. TV producers Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider brought bandmates Micky Dolenz, Michael Nesmith, Peter Tork and Davy Jones together, and their music was supervised by record producer Don Kirshner. This was the original pop model, giving way to NSYNC, Justin Bieber and Glee. But eventually, as often happens, The Monkees began to itch for independence. They went on to write and produce more of their own music and make the trippy cult classic Head. But for those who want to relive the golden age, rumor has it The Monkees will be“reuniting”(sans Nesmith) this year.

Go to episode 273
news

Music News

The original manuscript to Don McLean's 1971 hit "American Pie" sold to an anonymous bidder at Christie's for $1.2 million – enough cash to buy a new Chevy and maybe even finally saturate that levee. McLean has always been cryptic about what his lyrics mean, but the 16-page document may offer some clues. Greg reads the song as a crash course in rock ‘n’ roll history of the years between Buddy Holly's death and the writing of the song.

There's still another chance to bid on some pop memorabilia, however: the estate of Davy Jones is putting several items belonging to the late Monkees singer on the auction block in May. If you're lucky, you might be able to snag some of his gold records, guitars, or costumes. But Jim is most excited about the tambourine for sale – after Linda McCartney of Wings, Jones may be the most famous tambourine player in rock.

Go to episode 489

Music News

Monkees fans young and old were sad to learn of the passing of lead singer Davy Jones at age 66. As Jim and Greg explain, Jones wasn't much of a singer or musician, but had acting chops and most importantly, charisma. This was fitting for this postmodern band that still polarizes people today. Was he a manufactured pop star or the real deal? Whatever the answer, he will be missed. Jim and Greg play The Monkees' last top 10 hit "Valleri" in remembrance.

Go to episode 327

Music News

What does it say about the music industry when 2011's highest-earning musician didn't release any new music? Dr. Dre tops Forbes' annual list of music industry earners with an income of $110 million, beating out industry heavyweights like Bieber and Macca. But fans are still waiting for Detox - Dre's highly anticipated follow up to 2001 and The Chronic. So how'd Dre do it? By selling a ton of headphones.

Throughout the year Jim and Greg have paid homage to the musical greats we've lost. There were some big names in 2012 - Whitney Houston, Etta James, Levon Helm, Donna Summer, and Davy Jones just to name a few. With the year coming to a close, Jim and Greg take a moment to recognize more artists they didn't get to earlier this year: DC's own Godfather of Go-go Chuck Brown, and Eastern music ambassador Ravi Shankar. They play Brown's "Bustin' Loose" and Shankar's "Dhun (Fast Teental)" from the sitar master's 1967 Monterey Pop Festival performance in appreciation.

Go to episode 370