Results for Doc Pomus

dijs

Jim

“Save the Last Dance For Me”The Drifters

Not to completely dis Lou Reed, Jim decides to present the musician's softer side during the Desert Island Jukebox segment. Reed has an enviable encyclopedic knowledge of rock and roll, and he showcases his fandom in a recent issue of Rolling Stone. He talks about one of his, and Jim's, favorite songs: "Save the Last Dance For Me" by The Drifters. The song was co-written by one of Reed's heroes, Doc Pomus, and Reed schools even our critics by describing the song's inspiration. Pomus, suffering with Polio, is unable to dance with his wife at his wedding, so he jots down the lyrics on a place card (which was later gifted to Reed). The song became a classic, and one Jim wants to take with him if stranded on a desert island.

Go to episode 311
news

Music News

Sad news: singer Ben E. King has died at age 76 in New Jersey. After being discovered in a luncheonette in 1956, King scored a string of hit singles as a member of The Drifters and then as a solo artist. With the unique blend of grit and smoothness in his voice, King bridged the gap between the doo-wop and soul eras – he's the rare artist who's charted in four different decades. He'll forever be remembered for his 1961 solo hit "Stand By Me," but Greg also loves his moving performance with The Drifters on the Doc Pomus-penned "Save the Last Dance For Me."

Last month we also lost Jack Ely of the Portland garage band The Kingsmen, who sang lead on their immortal 1963 cover of Richard Berry's "Louie Louie." Rumors spread that Ely's indecipherable singing might be covering up dirty lyrics, outraging then-Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy and even prompting an FBI investigation. The more prosaic truth may have been that Ely's singing was slurred because his braces had just been tightened. While Ely may not be a household name, without those three chords, there would be no punk rock as we know it.

Go to episode 493