Results for Fleetwood Mac

interviews

Lindsey Buckingham

Jim and Greg have admired Lindsey Buckingham's solo albums for years, but during a stop on Fleetwood Mac's recent tour, the guitarist was willing to indulge all of our burning questions about the band. Jim was out of town, so Greg took the reigns on this one and covered everything from his unique guitar style, to the Buckingham/Nicks years to the effects of all that '70s drug excess. Lindsey reveals that in today's music environment, the band would've never lasted and credits the label with letting them tweak and reconfigure before hitting it big. He also talks about his ability to compartmentalize his relationship with Stevie Nicks and the work. Rumours is either the mark of insanity or courage! Lindsey also agrees with Greg that Tusk is the stepchild of the band's catalog, and you can either fault or credit him for that. And on the Stevie front…you‘d think their dynamic would’ve flatlined by now, but he admits that although married with children, he's still writing songs about her!

Go to episode 402

Elisabeth Vincentelli on ABBA

ABBA Forty years ago this month, Anni-Frid (Frida) Lyngstad, Benny Andersson, Björn Ulvaeus, and Agnetha Fältskog took the stage at Eurovision 1974, decked out in platform shoes and sequined suits, to perform a new song called "Waterloo." ABBA would become the first Swedish act to win the song contest. And while Eurovision winners rarely stay relevant, ABBA proved a huge exception, cranking out hit after hit in the 1970s before disbanding in 1983. But their legacy is complicated, explains Elisabeth Vincentelli. By day, she's the chief drama critic for the New York Post. But by night she's an ABBA superfan who wrote a 33 1/3 book on ABBA Gold, the group's definitive best-of collection (and one of the top-selling albums in European history).

As Elisabeth reveals to Jim and Greg, there's way more to this band than just "Dancing Queen." Both Agnetha and Frida were well-known performers in Sweden before they married Benny and Björn and started ABBA (Agnetha was also an accomplisehd songwriter). Unfortunately, the two couples struggled to maintain their relationships in the limelight, leading to a downward spiral that Elisabeth likens to Rumours-era Fleetwood Mac (with less tabloid coverage). Things finally fell apart in the early '80s. But a decade later, ABBA saw a strange resurgence among punk and gay subcultures, then among mainstream crowds, thanks to the Australian dramedy Muriel's Wedding and Broadway smash Mamma Mia!. The four members have all found success on their own, but Elisabeth has a bold prediction to make… Could an ABBA reunion could be in the works?

Go to episode 438

Iron and Wine

Next up, Iron and Wine join Jim and Greg in the studio. The band began as a lo-fi 4-track project for folk singer/songwriter Sam Beam. Today, he works with a full band and is selling out shows across the country. Many listeners may also be familiar with Iron and Wine through their contributions to soundtracks like Garden State, Twilight and Grey's Anatomy. Iron and Wine's most recent album is Kiss Each Other Clean, which was produced by Brian Deck. As Sam explains to Jim and Greg, it's a more pop-driven record, inspired by his own early experiences falling in love with music like Fleetwood Mac. But, he didn't abandon his lyrical style, one that is often inspired by the Bible. Check out Iron and Wine's live performance and video.

Go to episode 302
reviews
Seeds We SowSeeds We Sow available on iTunes

Lindsey Buckingham Seeds We Sow

'70s rock act Fleetwood Mac continues to tour today, but longtime member Lindsey Buckingham still makes room to record on his own. And that can be taken literally-Seeds We Sow is essentially a one-man-band record full of lush orchestrations, guitar and percussion. But, in contrast to the beautiful songs are the dark and weird lyrics. Greg hears that not all is right with Buckingham, but plenty is right with Seeds We Sow. He says Buy It. Jim is the first to admit he is not a Fleetwood Mac fan. For him there was too much rock excess. But he loves that Buckingham lets his freak flag fly solo, and is a convert on this album. He agrees, double Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 303
24 Karat Gold: Songs from the Vault24 Karat Gold: Songs from the Vault available on iTunes

Stevie Nicks 24 Karat Gold: Songs from the Vault

The "Welsh Witch", Stevie Nicks, is back with her eighth solo studio album called 24 Karat Gold: Songs from the Vault, and as the title suggests, the record features new recordings of old songs Nicks has kept locked away since the late 1960's. To reimagine the decades-old tracks, she's enlisted the help of a squeaky clean Nashville backing band and squeky clean pop stars like Lady Antebellum and Vanessa Carlton. Jim is not a fan of these choices. He misses the old Stevie's Celtic folk feel and her ethereal voice, which is now starting to show its age. Jim knows the Stevie Nicks-faithful will still want to try the album, but its mediocre songs and altered star make it a Trash It for the rest of us. Greg also misses Nicks‘ distinctive personality and tires of the album’s inability to turn her meandering ideas into more shapely pop songs. Greg credits Nicks' former love and Fleetwood Mac bandmate Lindsey Buckingham for helping her achieve that in the past, but he's nowhere to be found on this record; except in many of the song's lyrics, which provide a sometimes uncomfortably voyeristic window into the couple's storied relationship. That said, the stripped-down piano and "Landslide"-like vocals on the song "Lady" are impressive, so Greg gives 24 Karat Gold: Songs from the Vault a conditional Try It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 465
Under the SkinUnder the Skin available on iTunes

Lindsey Buckingham Under the Skin

Lindsey Buckingham, best known as the man behind Fleetwood Mac (and Stevie Nicks' ex), recently released his first solo album in 14 years. Under the Skin is a quiet, stripped-down record that was largely recorded in hotel rooms. But, Jim and Greg explain, Buckingham's dulcet tones should by no means imply a lack of turmoil. In fact, he seems as troubled as ever. Both critics really admire how open and emotional the singer is, and how much he has challenged himself musically — but, they're not sure how accessible Under the Skin is. Jim and Greg recommend most fans try the album out for a while and Burn It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 50
Under the BlacklightUnder the Blacklight available on iTunes

Rilo Kiley Under the Blacklight

In the final segment of the show, Jim and Greg review Under the Blacklight, the latest release from the Jenny Lewis-fronted pop band Rilo Kiley. After releasing such a successful solo debut, Greg notes that it's almost surprising that Lewis would return to her bandmates. But, she and ex-boyfriend Blake Sennett pen some lovely tracks together in a modern-day Fleetwood Mac style. Greg wishes they had dug deeper into the complications of their romantic history though, and only thinks a few tracks on Under the Blacklight are worth a Burn It. Jim thinks this album is one of the biggest turkeys of the year so far, and doesn't think Fleetwood Mac needs revisiting. He finds the album contrived and overproduced and gives it a hearty Trash It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 91
Gift of ScrewsGift of Screws available on iTunes

Lindsey Buckingham Gift of Screws

Lindsey Buckingham has released a new album called Gift of Screws. It's the third solo album from the Fleetwood Mac singer/songwriter, and Greg notes that Buckingham is much more experimental when he's on his own. But unlike with his previous record, Jim finds Buckingham to be also be much more joyful. He and Greg are both impressed with the guitar work and give Gift of Screws a double Buy It rating.

JimGreg
Go to episode 153
dijs

Greg

“Green Manalishi”Fleetwood Mac

Fleetwood Mac has reunited for another tour, inspiring Greg's Desert Island Jukebox pick this week. While most people think of Lindsay Buckingham or Stevie Nicks, Greg's favorite incarnation of Fleetwood Mac was the earliest, with British blues guitarist Peter Green. An idol to peers like Eric Clapton, Green heavily influenced heavy metal musicians. But, he was also hit hard by LSD use. According to Greg, you can hear Green's descent into madness, as well as his guitar skills, in this week's DIJ song, Fleetwood Mac's "Green Manalishi."

Go to episode 169
lists

Greg's Mixtape: A Curse I Cannot Lift

  1. Lindsey Buckingham, "I Am Waiting." A cover of a relatively obscure Rolling Stones track from "Aftermath" sets the mood of sunrise expectation and apprehension.“I am waiting … waiting for someone to come out of somewhere.”
  2. Midlake, "Roscoe." An echo from Lindsey Buckingham's past? The sound is mid-'70s Fleetwood Mac: dusky folk-rock. I can imagine Christine McVie doing a perfect cover of this song. The song is set in 1891, like a dream about a more innocent time.
  3. The Decemberists, "The Crane Wife 3." Still in the past, still dreaming, but the innocence turns to despair.
  4. Dirty on Purpose, "Car No-Drive." Wake up. Morning rush hour. This song sounds like it's pouring from the windows of a passing subway train. We're going somewhere…
  5. Rhymefest, "Bullet." To Iraq. Turn on the TV, and we see young recruits wondering how they ended up in a desert in the Middle East fighting a war they don't understand.
  6. Serena-Maneesh, "Drain Cosmetics." A sandstorm of guitars.
  7. Secret Machines, "Lightning Blue Eyes." Then tunneling out, and into the sunlight where "I felt awake, I was way out."
  8. Parts and Labor, "A Great Divide." A call to arms, a dividing line in the mix, day becomes night.
  9. TV on the Radio, "Wolf Like Me." Silhouettes dash against the moon —“Got a curse I cannot lift.”
  10. The Roots, "In the Music." A sinister night vibe, as low-riders slink through skyscraper canyons.
  11. Nelly Furtado, "Maneater." Where all sorts of nightcrawlers roam …
  12. Justin Timberlake, "What Goes Around/Comes Around." And a reckoning goes down — "I can‘t believe it’s ending this way."
  13. Van Hunt, "If I Take You Home." The night winds down, uneasy partners match up…
  14. Love is All, "Make Out Fall Out Make Up." The hangover aftermath —"I think I'll spend all day in bed."
  15. Gnarls Barkley, "Gone Daddy Gone." "Love is gone away."
  16. John Legend, "Show Me." A morning prayer for guidance.
  17. Beyoncé, "Irreplaceable." And she's ready to move on, a new day begins…
Go to episode 56

Devil Songs for Halloween

Whether or not you agree rock ‘n’ roll is the devil's music, Lucifer sure is a major player in pop. From Robert Johnson to "Sympathy for the Devil," beelzebub gets name dropped as much as the latest hip-hop sensation. Here are Jim and Greg's favorites to get you in the Halloween mood:

Go to episode 517
news

Music News

The Rolling Stones made headlines this week after inking an exclusive recording deal with Universal Music. This has prompted speculation that the Stones are planning to leave longtime label EMI, which is restructuring under new ownership. This would be one of many big name acts rumored to be headed for the hills, including Coldplay and Robbie Williams. Paul McCartney and Radiohead have already fled, and the potential loss of the Stones catalog could cost EMI over $6 million. New CEO Guy Hands refuses to express concern, but Jim and Greg predict that the music industry may come down from the six major labels it had at the turn of the century, to only three.

Singer/songwriter John Stewart passed away earlier this week at the age of 68. Stewart penned The Monkees' classic tune "Daydream Believer," but many listeners may not know about the huge song catalog he left behind. He recorded nearly four dozen solo albums and helped to create what we now know as "Americana." In addition to influencing artists like Lucinda Williams, Steve Earle and Roseanne Cash, he was idolized by Lindsey Buckingham, the Fleetwood Mac member who teamed up with him and Stevie Nicks for Stewart's hit single "Gold."

Go to episode 113

Music News

Proving the adage that everyone is a critic, the Vatican has released its first official Top Ten List of albums. The official Vatican paper, L'Osservatore Romano, has endorsed records by Oasis, The Beatles, Michael Jackson and Fleetwood Mac. And perhaps for the title alone, they also included Carlos Santana's Supernatural. It made a point of not including Bob Dylan, however, on the grounds that generations of less-talented Dylan acolytes have "harshly tested the ears and patience of listeners with their inferior imitations, thinking that their tortured meanderings might interest somebody."

In other music news, rock producer Ian Burgess passed away last week. As Jim explains, Burgess was one of the architects of the hyper-aggressive, yet melodic, indie rock sounds of the 1980's. He worked with a number of Midwest bands such as Naked Raygun, Pegboy and Big Black. He also served as a mentor to Big Black founder-turned producer Steve Albini. To honor Burgess, Jim and Greg play "I Don't Know" off Naked Raygun's 1985 album Throb Throb.

Go to episode 221

Music News

The thrill, alas, is gone: B.B. King, international ambassador for the blues, has passed away at 89. Although the blues is associated with pain and heartbreak, King took great joy in his music, playing shows around the world non-stop until practically the day he died. King had a unique approach in which his voice was in a constant conversation with his legendary guitar, Lucille. That style was picked up by British blues-rockers like Eric Clapton and Fleetwood Mac's Peter Green, and he influenced countless others after that. Greg thinks King's iconic sound was on display as early as 1951 on his song "Three O'Clock Blues," so he plays that recording in tribute to the great Mississippi bluesman.

Go to episode 495