Results for George Clinton

interviews

Bootsy Collins

Time to get funky. Jim and Greg are joined by Bootsy Collins to go through the history of Funk. The heart of the genre is the rhythm. When James Brown wanted to“give the drummer some,”he meant it. In addition, as funk grew so did the development of the black band. Previously, as with doo wop groups, the emphasis was on the singer. Bootsy's own career as a singer, songwriter and bassist mirrors the development of funk. After performing in the Pacemakers with his brother Catfish, both Collins men joined James Brown's backing band The JB's. Bootsy credits James Brown with teaching him the concept of "The One," and they collaborated on funk classics like "Get Up (I Feel Like Being a) Sex Machine" and "Super Bad." His next move was to Detroit to work with George Clinton on Parliament and Funkadelic, and he later formed his own group, Rubber Band. His latest album is aptly named The Funk Capital of the World.

To cap off the segment, Jim and Greg talk about two significant funk tracks. Greg plays "It's Your Thing," by The Isley Brothers, featuring virtuosic bass playing by a 16-year old Ernie Isley. Jim goes to Bootsy's home state and plays The Ohio Players' song "Funky Worm."

Go to episode 303
specials

Presidential Rock

On January 20th, thousands will celebrate the Inauguration of President-Elect Barack Obama. But before that Jim and Greg wanted to host their own celebration by playing the best songs ever written about the office of Commander-in-Chief.

Here's a collection of songs to kick off this new administration:

Go to episode 164

Psychedelic Soul

Next up Jim and Greg check into the“Psychedelic Shack”for a discussion of Psychedelic Soul music. One of the architects of the genre, Norman Whitfield, passed away recently, so Jim and Greg thought his sound warranted more discussion. As a songwriter and producer, Whitfield helped escort The Temptations from their Motown sound, to one that was much funkier and rock-inspired. As Greg explains Whitfield wanted to“out-Sly Sly.”By Sly he is of course referring to Sly and the Family Stone, who along with Jimi Hendrix, are the pillars of the early Psychedelic Soul movement. For a full taste of the genre, Jim and Greg recommend checking out the following artists:

  • The Temptations
  • Sly and the Family Stone
  • Jimi Hendrix
  • War
  • George Clinton
  • Isley Brothers
  • De La Soul
  • Digital Underground
  • Dr. Octagon
  • Gnarls Barkley
Go to episode 149
reviews
New Amerykah, Pt. 1 (4th World War)New AmErykah, Pt. 1: 4th World War available on iTunes

Erykah Badu New AmErykah, Pt. 1: 4th World War

Ever since 2000's Mama's Gun, Erykah Badu fans have been waiting for a follow-up. Jim and Greg are included in that anticipatory group. She's finally back with New AmErykah, Pt. 1: 4th World War, but Jim and Greg warn that listeners should not expect the same sound. Badu has taken "neo-soul" to an even more neo level. Greg describes it as a murky, psychedelic sound that owes as much to Miles Davis and Herbie Hancock as it does traditional soul artists. While it's not an easy listen, it's worth your effort according to Greg. Jim asks the listener to imagine Badu jamming with George Clinton, Curtis Mayfield and a psychedelic band somewhere in New Orleans. If that sounds like something you'd like to hear, both hosts urge you to Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 118
Def Mask - SingleDef Mask available on iTunes

Divine Styler Def Mask

R&B singer D'Angelo wasn't the only artist to emerge from an extended hiatus last month. Brooklyn rapper Divine Styler also returned with a surprise album in December. Def Mask is his first new dose of radical hip-hop in almost 15 years. The album steers clear of Styler's previous pseudo-psychedelic rhymes and rhythms. Instead, it charts a course for the stars joining the ranks of prominent musical Afrofuturists like George Clinton and Janelle Monae in creating a dense, sci-fi-laden sound. Styler's impressive wordplay takes a leery look at today's technology obsessed culture, but despite its dark, neo-noir tone, the album is able to maintain a certain amount of optimism throughout. Def Mask is an ambitious undertaking that is at times both unsettling and uplifting and it marks a celebrated return for Divine Styler. Both Jim and Greg say Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 476
What Were You Hoping For?What Were You Hoping For available on iTunes

Van Hunt What Were You Hoping For

After being cut loose from his major-label deal, singer/songwriter Van Hunt has a new independently released album out called What Were You Hoping For. Jim and Greg received exactly what they were hoping for - a musically inventive album that doesn't fit into one particular genre. Van Hunt is finally free to let his freak flag fly, and fly it does. Jim and Greg compare him to George Clinton and Prince and encourage you to Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 307
news

Music News

Dr. Dre announced a partnership with Best Buy. The rapper/producer will promote the new "Club Beats" area of the store featuring the latest audio and technology products, in addition to in-store appearances by Lady Gaga, Will.i.am and Dre himself. The big box retailer sees a growing market for DJ-oriented marketing, especially with the release of DJ Hero. So has this underground urban art form officially jumped the shark?

One of Dre's biggest hip hop productions was his 1993 track for Snoop Dogg, "Who Am I (What's My Name)." It featured a memorable sample of George Clinton's song "Atomic Dog." Most recently that song was at the center of a lawsuit between Clinton and his fellow songwriters and the R&B group Public Announcement. A federal jury agreed that Public Announcement infringed on the song's copyright by wrongfully using the lyric“bow wow wow, yippie yo, yippie yea.”But, most notably, the jury ruled that even the word“dog,”if used in an original or unusual way, can be protected by copyright.

Go to episode 207