Results for Germany

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Jim

“Major Tom (Völlig Losgelöst)”Peter Schilling

Jim has never been the world's biggest David Bowie fan, but he does love many of Bowie's less pretentious imitators. Neue Deutsche Welle artist Peter Schilling went so far as to write a synthpop response to Bowie's 1969 classic "Space Oddity," continuing the adventures of that song's Major Tom character. "Major Tom (Völlig Losgelöst)" reached the top of the charts in Germany in 1983, and the English-language version went on to become an international hit. It's now featured as the theme song to the new TV series Deutschland 83. Jim loves both the show and the song, so Major Tom now makes his home in the Desert Island Jukebox.

Go to episode 504

Jim

“Betrayal”Tangerine Dream

Like much of the TV-watching public, Jim enjoyed binge-watching the Netflix horror series "Stranger Things." The show hearkens back to many pop cultural touchstones of the '70s and '80s – including in its music. Jim notes that the synth-based score takes inspiration from the soundtrack work of the German band Tangerine Dream, a key act in the psychedelic krautrock movement. Jim's favorite Tangerine Dream score is for the 1977 William Friedkin film Sorcerer. He says the soundtrack perfectly matches the movie's dark, tense jungle setting. So as a dual nod to Stranger Things and Tangerine Dream, Jim nominates "Betrayal," the main theme from Sorcerer, to the Desert Island Jukebox.

Go to episode 561
news

Music News

Jim and Greg kick off the show by discussing the results of the biggest pop music contest in the world. No, not American IdolEurovision! That television broadcast drew more than 120 million viewers worldwide (compare with Idol's 24 million) and remains the world's most-watched non-sporting event. Germany is the big winner this year with its contestant 19-year-old Lena Meyer-Landrut.

Go to episode 236

Music News

Following up on their 2011 music business report last week, Jim and Greg are happy to announce that vinyl album sales continue to be healthy. For the third year in a row, Abbey Roadwas the top-selling vinyl album. But nostalgia isn't the only thing pushing record sales. New artists like Mumford and Sons, Bon Iver and The Black Keys also had top selling vinyl products. Jim and Greg are pleased to know that music fans continue to have affection for this format, especially in a year when digital music sales finally topped physical ones.

Coachella, the first of the big music festivals of the season, announced its upcoming lineup. During not one, but two weekends in the California desert, attendees can see performances by Dr. Dre and Snoop Dogg, Radiohead, The Black Keys and Jeff Mangum. But they'll miss out on a reported Black Sabbath reunion due to guitarist Tony Iommi's recent cancer diagnosis.

Our last bit of news proves that when it comes to the life of a musician, not a whole lot has changed in two centuries. A letter written by composer Ludwig van Beethoven has emerged in Germany valued at over $128,000. In what the BBC describes as six pages of“scrawled corrections,”Beethoven complains about his ailments, and like many a rocker today, a lack of money.

Go to episode 320

Music News

grateful_dead Jerry Garcia may be dead, but we're sure he'd also be grateful for huge outcry of interest from Grateful Dead fans for a series of reunion tribute shows in Chicago this summer. According to Greg's reporting for the Chicago Tribune nearly a half million fans went online at the same time with the hope of paying almost $200 a ticket. Many of them, of course, got shut out and can only hope to score tickets on the secondary market…that is if they are willing to pay $8,000 to $116,000! The show's promoter promises fans they will try to make the experience accessible via the web, but we recommend loading up your generic mp3 device with Dead tunes and heading over to kick back at your favorite (free) outdoor spot as an alternative idyll.

Jim and Greg next give an update on two ongoing court cases in the music world. First, the former British glam star Gary Glitter has been sentenced to 16 years in prison after being found guilty of indecently assaulting three girls in the late 1970's. There is no statute of limitations for such offenses in the UK.

And while less unseemly, the copyright case over "Blurred Lines" is also embarrassing for the artists involved. The trial pits Robin Thicke and his co-writers Pharrell Williams and T.I. against the family of Marvin Gaye. They, like many people, hear a lot of similarities to Gaye's 1977 hit "Got to Give It Up." So far the testimonies have been striking. Thicke admitted he was on drugs during the song's recording and that Pharrell was the primary force behind the song.“The biggest hit of my career was written by somebody else, and I was jealous and wanted credit,”he testified,“I felt it was a little white lie that didn‘t hurt his career but boosted mine.”No wonder so many of these cases don’t make it to a public courtroom.

After decades of being ready to review new releases on a Tuesday, Jim and Greg are preparing for a shift to Friday. But in this digital age, there's not much to prepare. The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry announced the decision as a way to eliminate variance from country to country (it's Monday in the UK and Friday in Germany). But in a year when Beyonce and Drake can release music whenever they want with no advance fanfare, this is another example of the music industry being well-behind the times.

Tom Wheeler, commissioner of the FCC delivered a ruling that won in a 3-2 vote to approve strong Net Neutrality rules across the country. The Net Neutrality concept posits that the internet should remain a level playing field; certain companies who control data flow cannot show a preference for one company over another due to self interests. Ars Technica reporter Jon Brodkin, joined us to talk about the historic ruling. He doesn't see a downside to the ruling and says that most of the large telecommunication companies will respond with lawsuits. Brodkin adds that the effect on music fans who enjoy streaming services will be largely positive at this point.

Go to episode 484

Music News

Norway announced it will become the first country to switch off FM Radio. The FM signal will be discontinued on January 11, 2017 and will shepherd in a digital a trend in Europe. Norway's Minister of Culture says the move will save the country $25 million a year.

The IFPI or International Federation of the Phonographic Industry, released a report called“Record Industry in Numbers”documenting the state of the music sales in 2014. Among the takeaways is that physical product is not dead, especially overseas. For example, in Japan and Germany, physical sales were 78% and 70% of overall sales. Also, global vinyl sales were up a massive 55% from 2013. Latin America was a growth sector for the industry: with digital revenues were up 32%, and even China, a hotbed of music piracy, showed promise when it came to legal sales.

Go to episode 491