Results for indie

interviews

Feist

This week's guest is Leslie Feist, an up-and-coming singer/songwriter. Born in Calgary and bred in the Toronto music scene, Feist is one of many Canadian indie acts rising in popularity. It seems that our neighbor to the north is the next Seattle or Portland. Bands like Broken Social Scene and Peaches, who can both claim Feist as collaborators, plus The Arcade Fire, Wolf Parade, Metric, Stars, The Constantines, Hidden Cameras, and Death from Above 1979, are all coming out of Canada (and are all a far cry from Shania Twain or Bryan Adams). During her interview with Jim and Greg, Feist performs "Gatekeeper," "Mushaboom," and a cover of "Secret Heart" by Ron Sexsmith. There are a number of covers on her latest album, Let It Die, including "In and Out" by The Bee Gees and "Now at Last" by Blossom Dearie.

Go to episode 13

Superchunk

It's a cliché to say it, but when you look up "indie rock," you do in fact see a photo of Superchunk. Since forming in 1989, the North Carolina quartet have helped establish indie rock's DIY model, as well as its sound. Superchunk bassist Laura Ballance and guitarist Mac McCaughan also founded Merge Records, one of the music industry's most successful indie labels. The label is still home to the band, as well as The Arcade Fire, Spoon and Teenage Fanclub. Mac, Laura and bandmates Jim Wilbur and Jon Wurster talk with Jim and Greg about how they've done it their way for so long. They also perform songs from their most recent release Majesty Shredding.

Go to episode 269

Top Albums of 2005

The“Best Records”list: It's“a sacred thing”in pop music fandom, says Jim, requiring a discerning ear and laser-like focus. Thankfully, our hosts are here to help. After sifting through hundreds of records, and countless days spent listening (perhaps to the discontent of their wives), they‘ve managed to pick out their absolute favorites. Here’s what Jim and Greg say they'll still be listening to in 2006.

Go to episode 2

Best Coast

Jim and Greg are joined by the members of Best Coast. The indie trio, named for lead singer Bethany Cosentino's beloved California region, has a unique combination of shoegaze rock and '60s throwback harmonies reminiscent of the Beach Boys and the Mamas and the Papas. Their debut Crazy for You was a surprise hit for an indie release-reaching the Billboard Top 40. Cosentino talks to Jim and Greg about her own musical roots (Dad performed with 70's rock band War), rock heroes (Stevie Nicks) and personal writing style. She's joined by band mates Bobb Bruno on guitars and Ali Koehler, formerly of The Vivian Girls, on drums for a live performance in the studio.

Go to episode 258

Grizzly Bear

Jim and Greg are joined next by the members of Grizzly Bear. The Brooklyn-based band started rather modestly in 2004. Now they've become one of the most talked about groups in indie music today. In addition to notable appearances at Lollapalooza and the Pitchfork Music Festival, the band opened for Radiohead and Paul Simon. Plus, they count Jay-Z and Beyonce as fans! Jim and Greg spoke with Daniel Rossen, Ed Droste, Chris Taylor and Christopher Bear on a Sunday morning in front of a live studio audience at the House of Blues in Chicago. There the band performed songs from its latest album Veckatimest. Unfortunately Michael McDonald wasn't there to join them on "While You Wait for the Others."

Go to episode 206
specials

Sub Pop Records

Sub Pop Records, the label that made "grunge" a household word, is turning 20. Since its inception the small Seattle outfit has exploded internationally, giving music fans a dose of the Northwest punk sound with bands like Nirvana, Soundgarden and Mudhoney. Now Sub Pop is home to indie phenoms The Shins and The Postal Service, as well as comedy duo Flight of the Conchords. Jim and Greg speak with Jonathan Poneman, who started the label in 1988 with former fanziner Bruce Pavitt. Poneman explains that there was so much great rock in that area at the time that they were compelled to document it. But their ambitions didn‘t stop there. Poneman discusses Pavitt’s assertion that the most vital culture happens outside the big media centers. This kind of big thinking paved the way for the breakout of regional music scenes and the idea that indie bands can be as big as major label ones.

To celebrate Sub Pop's anniversary Jim and Greg both pick their favorite tracks from the label. Greg starts with a song by The Afghan Whigs. He explains that the tradition of signing non-Northwest bands began with the Whigs. They started out as a faux-grunge band but became more distinctive when they brought in elements of soul. You can hear that in the track "Miles Iz Dead" off the album Congregation.

Jim also wanted to pick a song that showcased the diversity of Sub Pop. It's more than just a grunge label. Jim looks to Cardinal, a band that represents much of what's happening in the indie world today. The duo gave birth to orchestral pop, and one of its members, Eric Matthews, put out a terrific debut on Sub Pop in 1995 called It's Heavy In Here. Jim chooses to play that album's opener, "Fanfare."

Go to episode 137
classic album dissections
Let It Be (Expanded Edition)Let It Be available on iTunes

The Replacements Let It Be

The Replacements reunion offers us a great reason to revisit our 2007 Classic Album Dissection of the 1984 release Let It Be. Unlike previously dissected albums like Revolver and Songs in the Key of Life, Let It Be wasn't a major critical or commercial success. But, Jim and Greg believe it's one of the greatest albums ever made. It was the 4th album from the Minneapolis band, which was comprised of four“scruffy”members: Paul Westerberg, Bob Stinson, Tommy Stinson and Chris Mars. As Jim and Greg explain, this album put the band on the map and helped to define what we know today as "indie music." To learn more about the making of Let It Be and why it's so special, Jim and Greg talk with longtime Minneapolis music journalist Jim Walsh, author of The Replacements: All Over But the Shouting. To cap it all off Jim and Greg play what they think is the ultimate Let It Be song: Unsatisfied.

Go to episode 408
reviews
We Were Dead Before the Ship Even SankWe Were Dead Before The Ship Even Sank available on iTunes

Modest Mouse We Were Dead Before The Ship Even Sank

This show is an all-reviews blowout starting with the new release from Washington state indie rockers Modest Mouse. We Were Dead Before The Ship Even Sank is one of the most highly anticipated records of the season. Modest Mouse's underground fan base has emerged into the mainstream in the past few years, despite lead singer and chief songwriter Isaac Brock's status as a rather polarizing figure. Jim recommends fans check out Alan Goldsher's profile of Brock, Modest Mouse: A Pretty Good Read. Now, the band is joined by former Smiths' guitarist Johnny Marr. James Mercer, lead singer of The Shins, also provides backing vocals on a number of tracks. Greg thinks that Isaac Brock is doing what he does best on this album: combining quirky vocals and rhythms with a traditional pop sensibility. He describes it as a very well-crafted record that isn't over-thought or overproduced and gives We Were Dead Before The Ship Even Sank a Buy It. Jim was also impressed, describing the album as“brilliant.”He thinks Brock deals in gloom and doom better than his peers and urges everyone to Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 68
I Love You, HoneybearI Love You, Honeybear available on iTunes

Father John Misty I Love You, Honeybear

Like Phil Collins and Dave Grohl before him, Josh Tillman started a drummer for the indie band Fleet Foxes. In 2011 he went on a mystical, west-coast odyssey (drugs were involved) and returned with a new solo artist persona named Father John Misty. In his latest album I Love You, Honeybear, Misty chronicles falling in love with his wife with some unconventional love songs. Greg argues that it's not easy to write love songs that don't sound sticky, and commends Misty on the humor in his lyrics. But, he wishes the record was more musically flamboyant and gives it a Try It. To say Jim disliked this album is putting it mildly. He compares the listening experience to having an allergic reaction to bee stings. He doesn‘t hear the humor in Misty’s lyrics, but rather something more misogynistic. So he says Trash It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 481
Body Talk, Pt. 2Body Talk, Pt. 2 available on iTunes

Robyn Body Talk, Pt. 2

Swedish pop artist Robyn has been making music since she was a teenager. You might think of her as Sweden's answer to Britney Spears. But, she has since gone indie and edgy and began releasing a three part series called Body Talk last year. Body Talk, Pt. 2 feels like a full album to Jim. He loves her maturity and experimentation, noting that Robyn has even managed to make Snoop Dogg sound original. He gives it a Buy It rating. Greg agrees, and prompts Katy Perryto pay attention: This is how you make smart pop music. He doesn't hear anything as catchy as Body Talk Pt 1's "Dancing on My Own," but also gives the 2nd round a Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 253
Majesty ShreddingMajesty Shredding available on iTunes

Superchunk Majesty Shredding

Perhaps no band better symbolizes the indie rock underground than Superchunk. They have been committed to being "indie" both in terms of sound and practice since forming in Chapel Hill in 1989. Two of its members have gone on to run Merge Records, home to Arcade Fire and Spoon. While they never officially broke up, the band hasn't released an album in almost a decade. Majesty Shredding is worth the wait according to Greg. They do pop rock as good as anyone, and Mac McCaughan still sings with the enthusiasm of a kid. Jim agrees, adding that they did lose the plot for a little while. He's happy to hear they have returned to form - simple exuberance - and Superchunk gets a double Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 253
I'll Sleep When You're Dead

El-P I'll Sleep When You're Dead

Rapper and producer El-P's new album is I‘ll Sleep When You’re Dead. This is the second solo release for the Brooklyn artist, who made his dent as the founder of hip hop group Company Flow and indie label Definitive Jux. El-P prides himself on making hip hop that is in keeping with the genre's roots: two turntables and a microphone. But, rather than rely on beats and soul samples, El-P's collages are futuristic, and according to Greg,“skuzzy.”So much so, that he compares the rapper to Trent Reznor, who also makes an appearance on the record. As Jim explains, the dark, complicated soundscapes match the verses, which talk about violence and paranoia in the post-9/11 world. The songs are political, but not preachy, and Jim recommends them to anyone who is a fan of hip hop, or just a fan of interesting music. Greg praises El-P for being a classicist who can also look to the future. There's nothing stale or nostalgic here, but Greg warns that I‘ll Sleep When I’m Dead could be a little too challenging for some people's ears. With that small advisory, El-P gets two Buy Its.

JimGreg
Go to episode 75
Stuff Like That ThereStuff Like That There available on iTunes

Yo La Tengo Stuff Like That There

Yo La Tengo's live sets are famed for including covers of obscurities from the rock canon. Their 1990 album Fakebook was filled with surprising unplugged covers alongside acoustic reinterpretations of songs from the band's own catalog. Now on their fourteenth LP Stuff Like That There, the indie veterans are revisiting that concept. Greg admires the group's mission to direct listeners' attentions to neglected records they revere, both deep cuts from the distant past as well as songs by their underrated peers. But Greg wishes there was more variety in the hushed sound, so he gives the album a Try It. Jim has always loved the acoustic side of YLT since the band formed in his hometown of Hoboken, New Jersey. Jim finds the interplay of Georgia Hubley and Ira Kaplan's vocals to be lovely and is happy to see the return of guitarist Dave Schramm. It may be a surprise for fans of the noisier Yo La Tengo, but for Jim, Stuff Like That There is a Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 510
Lost in the DreamSlave Ambient available on iTunes

The War on Drugs Slave Ambient

The Philadelphia band The War on Drugs straddles the line between indie singer/songwriter and psychedelic rock. It was originally founded by Kurt Vile and Adam Granduceil, but Vile has since left to pursue a solo career. Granduceil continued as The War on Drugs, releasing a moderately succesful record called Slave Ambient in 2011. His new album, Lost in the Dream, is his best, according to Jim. Working out the songs on the road created a wonderful live atmosphere. It's perfect headphone music, says Jim: Buy It. Greg likes the record as well, but wishes some of the more meandering tracks were better edited. He gives Lost in the Dream a Try It rating.

JimGreg
Go to episode 433
I Hate MusicMajesty Shredding available on iTunes

Superchunk Majesty Shredding

Over three decades in rock, Chapel Hill's Superchunk has kept true to the idealistic indie spirit of its era, regularly turning out records even as members Mac McCaughan and Laura Balance started Merge Records (still one of the most successful indie labels in the game). The band's latest album is I Hate Music. On it, Greg says he hears the band questioning the“music is life, life is music”philosophy it's always held onto. Can music still rejuvenate in the face of death, aging, and burnout? For Superchunk, Jim says, the answer is always yes, and you can hear it in those guitars. I Hate Music might not be the exuberant celebration that was 2010's Majesty Shredding, but Jim and Greg agree it's nevertheless a Buy It record.

JimGreg
Go to episode 403
Collapse Into NowCollapse Into Now available on iTunes

R.E.M. Collapse Into Now

It's hard to believe, but R.E.M. has put out its fifteenth album. The formerly indie quartet from Athens is now a major label trio, and many fans have been waiting for a“return to form.”Well, they get it with Collapse Into Now…sort of. As Jim and Greg explain, the record is full of nods to older R.E.M. material, but nothing as strong. Why not just sit back and listen to the albums from the '80s and '90s? They add that the loss of drummer Bill Berry keeps getting magnified as the years go by. Collapse Into Now gets a double Burn It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 277
SunSun available on iTunes

Cat Power Sun

And now for something completely different. Indie darling Chan Marshall, who goes by the stage name Cat Power, has a new album out called Sun. Sun is not what one generally associates with Cat Power. Over eight solo albums Marshall has developed a dusky, lonesome sound whose pure melancholy is often intensified in concert (she's been known to curl up in a fetal ball onstage, so overcome with anxiety that she is unable to continue playing). Marshall wrote Sun as she was breaking up with her actor boyfriend Giovanni Ribisi, so one might ask, how sunny can Sun possibly be? Jim says it's all relative, but he likes this album better than Marshall's previous efforts. Instead of wallowing, Chan seems to be in self-help mode, reminding herself in "Ruin" that some people "don't have s* to eat." And Jim likes that she's traded in the dirgy guitar and piano for more upbeat synths on this record. He gives Sun a Burn It. Like Jim, Greg has found Marshall hard to take on previous albums, but he's come to appreciate Sun. Chan, he says, is in a dancier mood here - she's even got a fun little pop number in "3,6,9" - so he gives Sun a Buy it.

JimGreg
Go to episode 354
Manners (Bonus Track Version)Manners available on iTunes

Passion Pit Manners

The next album up for review is Manners, the debut from Boston-based Passion Pit. The electro-pop quintet is helmed by Michael Angelakos. It's his falsetto that dominates the album, in addition to the lush, swirling synths. In fact, the music is a little too lush and sugary for Mr. Kot, who wishes there were a few more moments of calm. He gives Manners a Try It rating. Jim was certain Greg would be all over this record. He hears the music as a successful, indie take on '80s disco and gives the album a Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 182
Tonight: Franz FerdinandTonight: Franz Ferdinand available on iTunes

Franz Ferdinand Tonight: Franz Ferdinand

Scottish indie rockers Franz Ferdinand have a new album out called Tonight: Franz Ferdinand. It's the third release for the New-New Wave band, and after a terrific debut, and a so-so follow-up, Jim and Greg were eager to see what the quartet had to offer. Greg hears a reconfiguration of their original sound. The dance element is more up front, making the rhythm section the most important one. Greg keeps waiting for lead singer Alex Kapranos to step up to the Bryan Ferry level, and until he does Greg gives Tonight: Franz Ferdinand a Try It. Jim doesn‘t think it’s fair to compare any mere mortal to Bryan Ferry and thinks Kapranos does a terrific job. He calls the group's routine“winning”and gives this album a Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 164
Merriweather Post PavilionMerriweather Post Pavilion available on iTunes

Animal Collective Merriweather Post Pavilion

Has the first great album of 2009 come upon us? That's the question Jim and Greg answer in their review of Merriweather Post Pavilion by Animal Collective. This is the 9th album for the experimental indie rockers, and one that is inspired by the concert venue in Maryland. Their goal was to make an album worthy of such an outdoor arena, and both Jim and Greg think that Animal Collective was successful. Previously Jim has felt that they veer too much towards the jam band spectrum of things, but with Merriweather, he's won over by the fresh melodies and dense harmonies. Greg explains that the songwriting is much stronger on this album. He calls it an“ecstatic dance record,”one that is a perfect antidote for the gloom of winter. Both critics give Merriweather Post Pavilion a Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 163
The GreatestThe Greatest available on iTunes

Cat Power The Greatest

Both albums reviewed this week are independent label releases. The first is by Chan Marshall, better known as Cat Power. A much-hyped indie darling for some time now, Cat Power just released her fourth full length album, The Greatest, on the Matador label. Our critics ponder whether it was appropriately named. According to Jim—not at all. Frankly, he hates it. He has never been a Cat Power fan, however, and doesn‘t understand the appeal of Marshall’s albums nor her onstage antics. Greg agrees that The Greatest is not, in fact, the greatest. But he does not think it's a "Trash It" album. He believes it's worth listening to for the fantastic Memphis Rhythm Band's appearance alone. Steve Potts, Flick Hodges and Teenie Hodges, who worked with Al Green, provide a wonderful backing for Marshall's sultry voice. The result is a "Burn It" for Greg.

JimGreg
Go to episode 9
dijs

Jim

“"The Gormleys Will Miss Me"”27 Various

This week, Jim chose the unique track "The Gormleys Will Miss Me" by the 27 Various for two reasons. One explanation is that after his recent DIJ selection by New Jersey's Red Buckets, it got him thinking more about underground indie rock from the 1980s. The other reason is that ever since Sound Opinions‘ intern Libby Gormley joined the team, Jim couldn’t get this track out of his head. While the Minneapolis band never gained huge traction, Jim loves this group, and finds this obscure song to be the perfect choice for this week's Desert Island Jukebox pick.

Go to episode 522
news

Music News

In the music news this week is the announcement that four major radio corporations accused of practicing payola have agreed to a settlement with the FCC. In addition to paying the government $12.5 million, they will provide free commercial radio airtime for independent labels and local artists. Jim and Greg talk to Jenny Toomey and Michael Bracy of the Future of Music Coalition about the settlement and whether this will actually make a dent in payola. Both Toomey and Bracy admit that payola has been around forever, and is part of larger issues the music industry needs to tackle, but they're happy these steps are being taken. Jim and Greg also hear thoughts from the heads of several independent labels. You'll hear from Jim Powers of Minty Fresh Records, Bettina Richards of Thrill Jockey Records and Peter Gordon of Thristy Ear Recordings. Each label head expresses a mix of skepticism and optimism, and speaks to the question of whether or not indie labels even need commercial radio anymore. Jim and Greg get the last word and explain that payola, like a cockroach, will probably find a way to survive.

Go to episode 67

Music News

Jim and Greg begin the show with a discussion of Lollapalooza and other summer festivals. There's Coachella in California and Bonnaroo in Tennessee, but Chicago is shaping up to be the major destination for music fans this year. The Lollapalooza lineup is impressive, with a diverse mix of bands including Lolla vets The Flaming Lips and Red Hot Chili Peppers, indie favorites Death Cab for Cutie and The Shins, and Chicago natives Wilco and Kanye West. Plus, the city will be home to two of the biggest independent music festivals: The Pitchfork Music Festival, featuring Destroyer, Art Brut, Spoon and post-punk pioneers Mission of Burma, and the Intonation Music Festival featuring The Streets, Bloc Party, Lupe Fiasco and a rare appearance by 13th Floor Elevators founder Roky Erickson.

Go to episode 21

Music News

It has been an historic few weeks for aging rockers on the Billboard charts. First, at age 88, Tony Bennett broke his own record as the oldest living artist to have a #1 record with Cheek to Cheek, his duet with Lady Gaga. Then, we have diva Barbra Streisand with her own duet album Partners. The success of her latest endeavor makes her the only artist to have a #1 album in each of the past six decades.

Just when you thought concert tickets couldn't get more expensive, they just might. Independent concert and event promotion company, C3 Presents will reportedly sell 51% of the company to Live Nation. C3 is responsible for events like Lollapalooza and Austin City Limits Music Festival. A collaboration with“Death Star”Live Nation would greatly increase that company's stake in the U.S. concert market and possibly lead to higher ticket prices for you the concertgoer.

Which designer has English indie pop band The xx in a fury? Hugo Boss recently used a song in its new ad campaign—one that sounds strikingly similar to "Intro" by The xx. The band is extremely unhappy, calling the song“a poorly designed fake.”Perhaps Hugo Boss should stick to designing clothes.

Go to episode 463

Music News

First up Jim and Greg do an update on a story discussed a few weeks ago. Despite pleas from a broad spectrum of internet radio broadcasters including National Public Radio and Yahoo, as well as some small scale mom and pop stations, the Copyright Royalty Board threw out requests to reconsider a ruling that hiked the royalties they must pay to record companies and artists. In addition, the judges declined to postpone a May 15 deadline by which the new royalties will have to be collected. While there is still one more chance to open the case with the court of appeals, it's likely that many webcasters are going to be put out of business by these new rulings. One thing that is for certain is that rulings like these and those to come down the line are certain to change the entire landscape of digital broadcasting.

Next up Jim and Greg talk to Doug Brod, Editor-in-Chief of Spin Magazine, about the upcoming season of“destination festivals.”While previously music fans would be treated to traveling music festivals like Lollapalooza coming to their neck of the woods, now there are large-scale, multi-day outdoor concerts dotted in different areas across the country. Often, these festivals have to compete for your attention by getting the biggest coup. This year it's the Rage Against the Machine reunion at Coachella, the Pearl Jam and Daft Punk performances at Lollapalooza, and a Police reunion at Bonnaroo.

Jim and Greg ask Doug to choose his favorite out of the many destination festivals this summer, and he goes with Coachella because of the line-up and the location. Greg agrees that the Coachella Valley is a spectacular place to experience a rock show, but he also urges music fans to travel two hours outside of Seattle, Washington to attend the Sasquatch Festival in the Gorge Amphitheater. It's another meeting of spectacular natural surroundings and an impressive bill of bands. Jim thinks that people will get the most bang for their buck at the Pitchfork Music Festival in Chicago, which features a number of indie bands, plus groups like Sonic Youth performing entire albums for a very reasonable price. But, being the sand and sun hater that he is, Jim won‘t pick his favorite summer festival. He’s actually ready for the entire phenomenon to die out and for rock to return to smoky clubs where it belongs.

Jim and Greg talk to Chicago Tribune Television Critic Maureen Ryan about the recent "Sanjaya phenomenon" on American Idol. Our hosts have long avoided talking about this popular TV show because, frankly, it has little to do with music. But, they were intrigued by the curious forces at work to keep the apparently talentless contestant Sanjaya Malakar on the show, and wanted to turn to Mo Ryan to find out why he became so popular, and why he couldn‘t survive. The only sense these critics can make out of Sanjaya’s reign is that for one brief moment the pop forces (pre-teens who love Sanjaya's androgynous, harmless sex appeal) and the punk forces (Vote for the Worst.com, Howard Stern, etc.) came together with one common goal: to save Sanjaya (and possibly take down the show). The convergence of these two sets was a rare occurence in popular culture, and it seems they weren‘t strong enough to prevent Sanjaya’s elimination. American Idol proved itself to be a more powerful“death star”than anyone expected.

For more information on music festivals, check out the footnotes below.

Go to episode 73

Music News

The Grammy Awards are usually, let's face it, kind of a snooze, and often a head-scratcher. But this year our hosts are excited about Arcade Fire winning Album of the Year. Most people, Greg included, were certain Eminem would take home the award. It was an upset, and for once, the Grammy voters honored excellence over sales. In fact, indie bands won 45 out of 108 categories, but that isn't reflected in the market. Greg also applauds the Grammys for shedding light on artists like Janelle Monáe and Esperanza Spaulding.

Guitar Hero has played its swan song. Or should we say swan riff? After a huge five year run, Activision has decided to pull the plug on the video game. This signals a decline for the music video game genre, including Rock Band, whose Beatles game didn‘t perform as well as expected. What’s the next trend? Dance!

Go to episode 273

Music News

First up in the news is the Future of Music Coalitions' report on the state of indie airplay on commercial radio stations. In 2007, after controversies surrounding payola, the FCC and four major radio corporations signed a voluntary agreement to air more local and independent artists. The FMC has been keeping tabs on how they're doing, and the stats are not good. Just as before, 85% of music on the radio comes from major labels. This may have been the conservative and profitable way to go for radio conglomerations in the past, but as the major label system crumbles, it would behoove radio to walk on the wild side a little more.

Following in the esteemed footsteps of Prince and No Doubt, Coldplay will give away a free live album with the purchase of a ticket to their Viva La Vida tour. Jim and Greg are always encouraged to see musicians try to give consumers a little more bang for your buck, especially since Coldplay tickets are not nearly as expensive as a lot of summer shows.

In other concert industry news, one group that isn't holding back spending in this economy is the corporate sponsor. According to IEG Sponsorship Report, sponsorships will hit an all-time high in 2009. Companies like JC Penney, Clorox and KC Masterpiece want to cash in on big name music acts. After seeing the Virgin Mobile-sponsored Britney Spears show recently, Jim and Greg wonder if these are such wise investments though. And, they shudder to think of the corporate presence at the upcoming Woodstock reunion.

Go to episode 180