Results for Jack Kerouac

reviews
One Fast Move or I'm Gone (Music from Kerouac's Big Sur)One Fast Move or I'm Gone: Music from Kerouac's Big Sur available on iTunes

Ben Gibbard & Jay Farrar One Fast Move or I'm Gone: Music from Kerouac's Big Sur

One of the 2009 artists that slipped through the radar was a collaboration between Jay Farrar of Son Volt and Ben Gibbard of Death Cab for Cutie. The two musicians bonded over their admiration for Jack Kerouac and created the soundtrack to a documentary about the writer. The result is One Fast Move or I'm Gone: Music from Kerouac's Big Sur. As Greg explains, Farrar's voice is perfectly suited to Kerouac's darker material. Greg also thinks he was smart to bring Gibbard in to lend a little optimism. He was spoiled by seeing them live, but would still recommend listeners buy the album to hear these two terrific voices. Jim, also a Kerouac fan, agrees that the album, complete with artwork, is a thing of beauty. One Fast Move gets a double Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 216
Teeth DreamsTeeth Dreams available on iTunes

The Hold Steady Teeth Dreams

Minneapolis-born, Brooklyn-bred Beat-rockers The Hold Steady have undergone a few changes since their 2009 visit to Sound Opinions. The band took a break after the departure of keyboardist (and moustache idol) Franz Nicolay, while frontman Craig Finn put out a solo album. Now the boys are back, with an extra guitarist, Steve Selvidge, and a sixth album called Teeth Dreams. It's their first venture with producer Nick Raskulinecz (best known for his work with Foo Fighters, Rush, and Evanesence), and as Greg points out, their sound is“slicker”than ever. Perhaps too slick — while the band can still rock, the album is bogged down with slow, melodramatic experimentation. Greg has to say Try It. Jim scoffs at the lyricist's literary bent — with Finn so obviously ripping off Raymond Chandler and Jack Kerouac, this host has to wonder if it's parody. Regardless, Jim prefers The Hold Steady live, in their bombastic, Springsteen-ian element — as for Teeth Dreams, it's a Trash It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 436
features

Music of the Beat Generation

If you read On the Road in high school, you know a thing or two about the Beat movement's influence on literature. This week, Text and Drugs and Rock ‘n’ Roll author Simon Warner wants to get you thinking about the Beat influence on rock. Forget the stereotypical bongos; Warner says Beat fathers like Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac were most inspired by Harlem's avant-garde jazz invention, Bebop. Warner makes the case that the Beats influenced a whole generation of rock lyricists - Bob Dylan and John Lennon among them - to embrace a more surrealist, personal, and politically engaged approach to lyric-writing. Think of "Subterranean Homesick Blues," he says, as Beat poetry with a, well, beat. But while Ginsberg and Kerouac struck a chord with the hippie generation, it was Beat colleague William S. Burroughs who served as guru to the later musical avant-garde. 1970's punks Jim Carroll and Patti Smith, and alternative era stars like Kurt Cobain and Sonic Youth, all made pilgrimages to Burroughs' NYC bunker-apartment to pay their respects to“Old Bull Lee.”Burroughs'“cut up”writing technique may still inspire wordsmiths from Bowie to Thom Yorke, but Jim thinks it's Kerouac whose legacy may ultimately be the most lasting. It's that writer's spirit of adventure, Jim says, that continues to motivate every indie band still "on the road."

Go to episode 398