Results for Jeff Buckley

reviews
So Real: Songs from Jeff BuckleySo Real: Songs From Jeff Buckley available on iTunes

Jeff Buckley So Real: Songs From Jeff Buckley

Next up is So Real: Songs From Jeff Buckley. Before Jeff Buckley's death he only recorded one full length album and one EP, but in the decade following he grew as a cult figure and fans were treated to a flood of posthumous releases. This one is pretty generic to Jim and Greg. Jim describes So Real as nothing but sticking a hand into the pocket of a worshipful audience. Greg agrees, furthering that there should be a rule put into place forbidding anyone who has released one album from releasing a greatest hits album-whether they are dead or alive. Both critics give the Buckley album a Trash It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 78
VeckatimestVeckatimest available on iTunes

Grizzly Bear Veckatimest

The final album up for review is the third release from Brooklyn quartet Grizzly Bear. Veckatimest, named for an island off the coast of Massachusetts, is already getting hailed by many as one of the top albums of the year. Jim hears a lot of similarities to what bands like Fleet Foxes and Blitzen Trapper are doing, but with the addition of synths, Jeff Buckley-style vocals, and lo-fi production. In other words, it drives him crazy. A few moments of beauty, but he gives it a Try It. Greg loves how the band creates its own space in the album. He can picture the room they made it in. The record is not accessible, but when you are in the right mood to be shut in, Veckatimist will hit you. Greg gives it a Buy It rating.

JimGreg
Go to episode 183
Once AgainOnce Again available on iTunes

John Legend Once Again

The second album up for review this week also charted high on Billboard. John Legend's new album, Once Again, debuted at number three, following My Chemical Romance. Legend received a lot of acclaim, as well as a number of Grammy Awards, for his first release, Get Lifted. So, the pressure was on for this sophomore effort. Both Jim and Greg think Legend is a really wonderful songwriter who brings R&B back to its heyday. And both critics find tracks like "Show Me" (which had surprising inspirations in Jeff Buckley and Sufjan Stevens) to be standouts. But neither felt that Legend was really doing anything new. Therefore Jim only recommends listeners Burn It. Greg agrees that Once Again gives listeners much of the same, but he thinks the same is pretty good. He gives it a Buy It rating.

JimGreg
Go to episode 49
lists

Funeral Songs

The complete top five funeral songs, according to the Register:

  • James Blunt, "Goodbye My Lover"
  • Robbie Williams, "Angels"
  • Jennifer Warnes and Bill Medley, "I've Had the Time of My Life"
  • Bette Midler, "Wind Beneath My Wings"
  • "Pie Jesu"

We asked our Sound Opinions listeners this same, morbid question. Here are some of the“swan songs”you told us about via email or message board:

  • Santo and Johnny, "Sleepwalk"
  • The Buzzcocks, "Everybody's Happy Nowadays"
  • Curtis Mayfield, "Freddie's Dead"
  • Jeff Buckley, "Corpus Christi Texas"
  • R.E.M., "Try Not to Breathe"
  • Jeff Buckley, "Satisfied Mind"
  • Tom Waits, "Come On Up To The House"
  • Peter Gabriel, "I Grieve"
  • Joy Division, "In a Lonely Place"
  • The Beach Boys, "God Only Knows"
  • Alice Cooper, "I Love the Dead"
  • Talking Heads, "This Must Be the Place (Naïve Melody)"
  • Billy Bragg and Wilco, "Remember the Mountain Bed"

Greg

Jim and Greg were forced to think about their final day as well. Greg goes first (since Jim predicts he actually will). He decides he wants Sound Opinions guest John Cale's cover of "Hallelujah" to be played at his funeral. He calls it the 20th century version of "Amazing Grace". Although Cale's version strays from Leonard Cohen's original, Greg thinks the message remains intact: "I made a lot of mistakes, but it was all worthwhile."

Jim

Jim predicts that even at his funeral he won't be able to resist one last chance to be sarcastic. He chooses an irreverent version of Frank Sinatra's classic "My Way." Jim shares Hoboken roots with“Ol' Blue Eyes,”but he feels he shares a lot more with Sex Pistols member Sid Vicious. So all of you Sound Opinions listeners who plan to come out to mourn on that fateful day will get to enjoy this punk cover.

Go to episode 47

Posthumous Releases

It's true that rock and roll can never die, and neither can its icons. Recently music fans have been treated to three major posthumous releases from Elliott Smith, Jeff Buckley and Nick Drake. Releasing music by a deceased artist is tricky business; you can run the risk of doing overkill or being tacky. Let's see how these three memorial efforts pan out:

Go to episode 78

One and Done

This week, Jim and Greg wanted to acknowledge some artists who made one great debut record, only to never record another studio album. They pick some of their favorite "one and done artists," from well-known artists like Lauryn Hill, to buried treasures like The Monks.

Go to episode 589
news

Music News

2016 continues to be an awful year for musical deaths, and we've had four more in recent weeks. First, we lost Leon Russell, the famous session player and solo artist who recorded with a diverse roster of artists from Frank Sinatra to Aretha Franklin. The pianist and singer-songwriter Mose Allison also died recently at 89. Allison blended country blues and bebop and influenced rock musicians from Randy Newman to Pete Townshend. Though less of a household name, archivist Billy Miller also made great contributions to rock music. As co-founder of Norton Records, he brought much needed attention to neglected artists like Hasil Adkins, Link Wray, and The Sonics.

Leonard Cohen But the most significant loss was Leonard Cohen. The Canadian singer-songwriter established himself on the New York scene with his debut album Songs of Leonard Cohen in 1967. That record provided inspiration to filmmaker Robert Altman on his 1971 anti-western McCabe & Mrs. Miller, a collaboration that Greg feels is a key part of Cohen's career. Cohen's records, however, were often ill-served by overproduction, with his voice pushed to the rear. It took interpretations bu other artists to bring the songs to their full potential, most notably on the many covers of his most famous tune "Hallelujah," from John Cale to Jeff Buckley to Kate McKinnon on SNL. But remarkably, Cohen figured things out toward the end of his life. He played countless shows in the past decade and released some of the strongest albums of his career in his seventies and eighties. In fact, for the uninitiated listener, Jim and Greg recommend beginning with his 2009 Live in London album featuring his greatest songs in new, tighter arrangements.

Go to episode 573