Results for Justin Bieber

interviews

L.A. Reid

lareidcoachella TLC, Mariah Carey, Pink, Justin Bieber, Outkast, Usher, Whitney Houston, Jay-Z, Kanye West…you name the pop star, and chances are he or she has worked with this week's guest, Antonio“L.A.”Reid. While he began as a drummer in the R&B group The Deele, it's really behind-the-scenes that L.A. has made the most awesome noise—first, as a songwriter/producer with Babyface in the 1980s and 1990s, then as a record exec at LaFace, Arista, Island Def Jam and now Epic Records.

L.A. shares his insights into what makes a great pop song, great (melody, hooks, emotion and the ability to sound good, even with a pillow over it) and some of his biggest professional triumphs (signing“the Beast”Rihanna, coaching Kanye West) and failures (Lady Gaga…the one that got away). He's also not afraid to get candid about music industry sacred cows, whether it's Michael Jackson or major labels themselves.

Go to episode 542
specials

The Monkees

Hey, hey, it's The Monkees! Jim and Greg go ape on this episode with Eric Lefcowitz, author of Monkee Business: The Revolutionary Made For TV Band. The three men talk about the band's history as a group manufactured to tap into Beatlemania. TV producers Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider brought bandmates Micky Dolenz, Michael Nesmith, Peter Tork and Davy Jones together, and their music was supervised by record producer Don Kirshner. This was the original pop model, giving way to NSYNC, Justin Bieber and Glee. But eventually, as often happens, The Monkees began to itch for independence. They went on to write and produce more of their own music and make the trippy cult classic Head. But for those who want to relive the golden age, rumor has it The Monkees will be“reuniting”(sans Nesmith) this year.

Go to episode 273

The Monkees

Hey, hey it's The Monkees! Jim and Greg go ape on this episode with Eric Lefcowitz, author of Monkee Business: The Revolutionary Made For TV Band. Monkees teen icon Davy Jones died last week at age 66, and so Jim and Greg return to this 2011 conversation. The three men talk about the band's history as a group manufactured to tap into Beatlemania. TV producers Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider brought bandmates Micky Dolenz, Michael Nesmith, Peter Tork and Davy Jones together, and their music was supervised by record producer Don Kirshner. This was the original pop model, giving way to N'Sync, Justin Bieber and Glee. But eventually, as often happens, The Monkees began to itch for independence. They went on to write and produce more of their own music and make the trippy cult classic Head. And of course, there were a number of reunion efforts in later decades. But, for many their legacy remains those wacky TV moments and classic pop songs.

Go to episode 328
reviews
Chance

Chance the Rapper Coloring Book

Chicago artist Chance the Rapper recently released his third mixtape, Coloring Book. And while he's at the forefront of the rap genre, he's never actually sold a single album. That's because all three of his mixtape releases, as well as two collaborative albums, can be downloaded for free from the Internet. On Coloring Book, Chance enlists a slew of popular guest stars, from fellow Chicagoan Kanye West to the man of the moment, Justin Bieber. Jim really enjoyed this record, especially Chance's use of gospel music to empower individuals and generate a sense of community in order to combat violence. While he doesn't think it is quite as good as his last release, Acid Rap, Jim strongly believes the music and lyrical insight on this album is equal parts impressive and inspiring. He gives it a Buy It. Greg agrees, saying that Coloring Book is one of the most ambitious records in hip hop right now. He even points out that West's recent album, The Life of Pablo, wouldn‘t be what it is without Chance’s gospel sound influence. Greg appreciates the larger themes of the album and how it connects so well to the music of the Civil Rights Movement. It's a Double Buy It for Coloring Book.

JimGreg
Go to episode 550
news

Music News

When People Magazine calls an artist the "World's Biggest Pop Star," who are we to argue? The person in question is 16-year-old Justin Bieber, and he recently became the youngest artist to debut at #1 on the charts since Stevie Wonder. Bieber has appeared on American Idol and at The White House and has been causing tween hysteria across the country. What Jim and Greg find interesting about the singer is how his fame seems to be the result of a purely 21st century digital music model. He can thank YouTube for his success. Also, Jim marvels at the relative innocence of Bieber's lyrics. Greg predicts that Bieber's transition to the adult contemporary market could be pretty seamless, even if his adolescence isn't.

Go to episode 228

Music News

Jim and Greg start the show by wishing YouTube a happy 5th birthday. The internet video site marked the occasion by announcing that it now gets more than 2 billion hits daily. It's doing better than all 3 major television networks. And viral phenoms Justin Bieber and Greyson Chance will certainly want to extend their congratulations to YouTube. Unfortunately our personal favorite has yet to score that major record deal.

Last week LimeWire was found guilty of copyright infringement last week in a New York court. This was the first case targeting a file-sharing software maker following the 2005 Grokster decision, in which the U.S. Supreme Court cleared the way for lawsuits targeting companies that induced or encouraged file-sharing piracy. It's a huge victory for the“content industry,”but as Greg explains, LimeWire has a lot of resources–we shouldn't count them out yet.

Next Jim and Greg bid farewell to metal icon Ronnie James Dio. He died this week at age 67. Dio fronted a number of major metal bands, including the second incarnation of Black Sabbath. Fans may also remember him from Tenacious D in the Pick of Destiny, and he is sometimes credited with popularizing the rock“devil's horns”gesture. He'll be missed by many a metal fan. roc docs

Go to episode 234

Music News

Two of the summer's biggest tours will not be coming to a city near you. Both U2 and Christina Aguilera have announced postponements, and the concert industry, and in particular Live Nation, will be taking a big hit. U2 alone was projected to bring in $200 million.

In other concert news, more cancellations have been announced in Arizona. A number of acts, including Pitbull and Cypress Hill, have taken the southwestern state off their schedule because of its controversial new immigration law. And even more artists are asking others to follow suit. Jim wonders if musicians might make a bigger impact by continuing to perform in Arizona and expressing their outrage live.

In New York, music fans will be experiencing some unique protection in the near future. Governor Paterson recently reminded ticket retailers like StubHub, that now that a 2007 scalping law has expired, a more restrictive law from the 1920s is back in effect. This law prevents ticket re-sellers, or scalpers, from raising the original price by more than $2. Good news for audiences, bad news for Ticketmaster.

Finally in the news, Jim and Greg remark on the absurdity of rock's V.I.P. ticket. Acts like Justin Bieber and The Eagles will be charging fans hundreds and hundreds of dollars for more access. Both our hosts miss the day when the biggest fan got to make it to the front row, not the biggest wallet.

Go to episode 235

Music News

Susan Boye Last week Jim and Greg reviewed the new album by The Black Eyed Peas, and this week they were sure it would be a #1 hit. But if there's anyone that can give the Peas a run for their money, it's…Susan Boyle? The Britain's Got Talent winner is the top seller of the week with her new album The Gift, beating out not only The Black Eyed Peas, but Kanye West and Taylor Swift. This news is further evidence that the physical album chart is dominated by people who still buy physical albums, a.k.a.“older folks.”Which leads to the next story…

Billboard has recognized that its standard album chart might not be a fully accurate representation of what's“popular”in music. In today's world, an artist's tweets, followers, fans, friends and hits are just as important indicators as record sales. So with that in mind they've launched the new Social 50. At the top of Social 50 are artists like Rihanna, Justin Bieber, Eminem and Nicki Minaj – all performers who sell records. But the chart also has the potential to recognize non-traditional acts like Widespread Panic, Girl Talk and Robyn, who consistently sell out shows, but don't have a big retail presence. Jim and Greg welcome Billboard to the 21st century.

Still shopping for holiday gifts and got a few thousand to spare? Well, you could get your loved one the original lyrics to Bob Dylan's song "The Times They Are a-Changin." And by a few thousand we mean $300,000. That's how much the sheet of unruled notebook paper is expected to go for at an upcoming auction. December certainly seems to be the month of rock memorabilia sales. Johnny Cash's jumpsuit, which he wore during his concert at San Quentin and made famous in this image, went for $50,000. Michael Jackson's glove sold for $300,000, and a decades old legal letter featuring John Lennon's original lyrics to "I'm Only Sleeping" is expected to go for over $500,000.

Go to episode 263

Music News

Last week Justin Bieber's fans sold out his entire North American tour in under an hour (that's an average of 1,000 tix a second). Beliebers indeed. If you're asking how this is even possible, you aren't alone. NPR talked to concert industry expert Gary Bongiovanni, who said, as Jim puts it,“the game is rigged.”Once the scalpers, fans clubs, credit card companies and radio stations have gotten their cut of the tickets (whether through pre-sale or, in the case of scalpers, by using bot programs to "cut the line"), less than half of the stated number of tickets actually go on sale to the public. If you're wondering why you can't get tickets to your favorite act, this is why.

Go to episode 341

Music News

The end of year numbers are in, and the the music industry has something to celebrate. Sales increased by 3% in 2012, driven mostly by digital music. And, what was long suspected has now been confirmed: Adele has topped the charts two years in a row, making her the first artist in the SoundScan era to do this. 2012's other big winners? Taylor Swift, One Direction, Justin Bieber, and the only act in this year's top 10 to come close to "rock" - Mumford & Sons. At least Jim and Greg can take solace in the fact that vinyl sales were up yet again.

Go to episode 372