Results for Neu!

interviews

Michael Rother

Our guest this week might not be a familiar name to most. But, Michael Rother is one of the most innovative figures in rock. Along with Klaus Dinger, he formed Neu! and created three hugely influential albums in the 1970's. They were part of a great wave of German art rock of that period and continue to be name checked by everyone from Wilco to Sonic Youth to U2. Rother talks to Jim and Greg about his solo work and his time with Neu!. The band's back catalog is now available in a limited edition box set, and Rother is touring the country with a new band under the name Hallogallo 2010.

Go to episode 253

Sunflower Bean

Sunflower Bean Last year at South By Southwest, Jim and Greg discovered a young, talented Brooklyn rock band called Sunflower Bean. The group is made up of bassist and singer Julia Cumming, guitarist and singer Nick Kivlen and drummer Jacob Faber. What makes the members of Sunflower Bean so interesting is their pursuit of a career in rock music despite growing up in the home of hip hop and in the age of EDM. However, that doesn‘t mean they don’t have diverse influences, channeling artists like Syd Barrett, The Beach Boys and Neu! at times on their debut album Human Ceremony. Greg sat down to chat with the band when they were in Chicago, and they talked about musical influences, Sunflower Bean's origin and how the group held the title of most shows played in New York City in 2014. Plus, they'll give a fun live performance.

Go to episode 590
genre dissections

Krautrock

Jim and Greg devote this episode to dissecting the '70s German art-rock movement known as Krautrock. The Krautrock bands themselves, however, preferred the term "kosmische Musik" (cosmic music) to describe their spacey, pulsating freak-outs that combined psychedelia with the electronic innovation of classical composers like Karlheinz Stockhausen. Kraftwerk pioneered the use of electronic instruments to achieve an industrial sound. Neu!, initially an offshoot of Kraftwerk, introduced a hypnotic drumbeat called "motorik" that has been copied by bands for decades. (Check out our 2010 interview with Neu! founder Michael Rother). Jim particularly highlights the inimitable metronomic drumming of Can's Jaki Liebezeit, who died on January 22 at age 78. For Greg, the band Faust was the prime example of the movement's willingness to experiment.

Jim and Greg also trace the incredible influence of Krautrock on music that followed. In the rock world, the German bands have been a touchstone for indie rockers like Stereolab, shoegazers like My Bloody Valentine, post-rock bands like Tortoise, and much more. But the influence is perhaps most pronounced in electronic dance music. It's hard to imagine Detroit techno, Eurodisco, or ambient techno existing without these cosmic forerunners.

Go to episode 583
lists

Best Driving Songs

For many of us summer equals a road trip. And a road trip equals great Driving Music. During this episode Jim and Greg play their favorite driving songs.

Go to episode 188
news

Music News

Jim and Greg have done many news stories about changing modes of distribution, production and sales in the music industry. But Jill Sobule recently presented a unique idea that caught their eye. They talk to the "I Kissed a Girl" singer about why she decided to ask fans to finance her new record. Depending at what level a fan gives they're entitled to gifts ranging from a free digital download of the album ($10) to a Sobule-recorded instrumental theme song ($500). So far Sobule has raised over $80K. Now listeners just have to wait and hear the result. And, Sobule says she's open to album title names.

Obituaries are sad to be sure, but as Jim explains, they are also an opportunity to honor important artists. Last week German art rock pioneer Klaus Dinger died at the age of 61. Dinger is one of Jim's heroes, so while he was crushed to hear the news of his death, he was also happy he could showcase the musician's work at the top of the show. Dinger was a member of both Kraftwerk and Neu!, two of the most influential Krautrock bands of all time. In fact, without both groups electronica as we know it wouldn‘t exist today. Check out Jim’s blog post about Dinger and listen to his classic Neu! track "Hallogallo."

Go to episode 124