Results for New Orleans

interviews

Trombone Shorty

Up next, Troy“Trombone Shorty”Andrews and his band Orleans Avenue. At just 25, Troy has already been playing music for two decades, and professionally for nearly as long. He has recorded half a dozen albums, toured the world and collaborated with a who's who of New Orleans legends like The Nevilles and Rebirth Brass Band, in addition to Green Day, Jeff Beck and Eric Clapton. Somehow he also found time to play himself in a recurring role on the hit HBO show Treme, which takes place in his neighborhood in New Orleans' 6th ward. Jim and Greg were anxious to hear the group perform songs from Trombone Shorty's albums For True and Backatown. They also wanted to hear about Troy's experience after Hurricane Katrina and his philosophy on so-called rules of jazz. Listen or watch and you'll hear (luckily) there are none.

Go to episode 314

Allen Toussaint

Allen Toussaint is a flat-out musical legend. The New Orleans native has been playing music since the age of 7 and has collaborated with a who's who of the New Orleans scene: Dr. John, Huey Smith, Irma Thomas, Earl King & many more. The piano man has also written songs for Robert Plant and Alison Krauss, DEVO, Warren Zevon, and Patti Labelle. Allen joined Jim and Greg in the studio after the release of his latest album Songbook, a live recording that documents his career via a series of solo piano shows at Joe's Pub in New York City. Allen talks about about the origins of his most popular songs, like "Fortune Teller" and "Working in a Coal Mine," as well as "Whipped Cream," which became the theme for The Dating Game.

Go to episode 432

Allen Toussaint

Allen Toussaint, musical legend out of New Orleans, died on November 10 at the age of 77. In honor of his passing, Jim and Greg revisit their 2013 conversation with the great pianist, singer, songwriter, and producer. Toussaint began playing music at the age of 7 and throughout his career collaborated with a who's who of the New Orleans scene: Dr. John, Huey Smith, Irma Thomas, Earl King & many more. The piano man also wrote dozens of classic songs that have since entered the rock canon, having been covered by artists like Robert Plant and Alison Krauss, DEVO, Warren Zevon, and Patti Labelle. Allen joined Jim and Greg in the studio after the release of his album Songbook, a live recording that documents his career via a series of solo piano shows at Joe's Pub in New York City. Allen talked about about the origins of his most popular songs like "Fortune Teller" and "Working in a Coal Mine," as well as "Whipped Cream," which became the theme for The Dating Game.

Go to episode 520
reviews
The River In Reverse (Digital Version)The River in Reverse available on iTunes

Elvis Costello The River in Reverse

Elvis Costello, the singer/songwriter who has taken on New Wave, punk, ska, country and pop, is tackling R&B on his latest release, The River in Reverse. The album is a collaboration between Costello and Allen Toussaint, the multi-talented New Orleans musician. Toussaint is responsible for hits like "Working in a Coal Mine," "I Like It Like That," and "Lady Marmalade," and has worked with The Band, Paul Simon and The Meters. The two collaborated after Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans, but neither Jim nor Greg think Costello's voice is up to the task of handling Toussaint's songs. Costello is a name that can garner attention for Toussaint, and Greg knows that his heart is in the right place, but it is only a Burn It record for both critics.

JimGreg
Go to episode 27
New Amerykah, Pt. 1 (4th World War)New AmErykah, Pt. 1: 4th World War available on iTunes

Erykah Badu New AmErykah, Pt. 1: 4th World War

Ever since 2000's Mama's Gun, Erykah Badu fans have been waiting for a follow-up. Jim and Greg are included in that anticipatory group. She's finally back with New AmErykah, Pt. 1: 4th World War, but Jim and Greg warn that listeners should not expect the same sound. Badu has taken "neo-soul" to an even more neo level. Greg describes it as a murky, psychedelic sound that owes as much to Miles Davis and Herbie Hancock as it does traditional soul artists. While it's not an easy listen, it's worth your effort according to Greg. Jim asks the listener to imagine Badu jamming with George Clinton, Curtis Mayfield and a psychedelic band somewhere in New Orleans. If that sounds like something you'd like to hear, both hosts urge you to Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 118
Harps and AngelsHarps and Angels available on iTunes

Randy Newman Harps and Angels

"Anti-singer-songwriter" Randy Newman just released his first new album in nine years called Harps and Angels. The Oscar and Emmy-winning musician, who has been best known lately for his movie soundtracks, is again combining humor and politics with his New Orleans-style piano playing — a combination Jim describes as being as poignant as popular music can get. Newman's searing critiques are brilliant, prompting Jim to give the album a Buy It. Greg agrees, noting that Newman accurately casts stones at himself as well as others, and warns listeners that they won't hear a lot of contemporary sounds. But, he thinks Newman is as good as ever and also gives Harps and Angels a Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 140
Remind Me In 3 Days...Remind Me in 3 Days available on iTunes

The Knux Remind Me in 3 Days

The Knux is a hip-hop brother act originally from New Orleans. Their new album Remind Me in 3 Days follows the release of a successful MySpace hit "Cappuccino." Jim admits that they aren't the greatest of rappers, but he was blown away by their enthusiasm. That enthusiasm extends to the inventive production as well. Greg agrees, calling the duo“audacious.”But he notes that while they bring in lots of reference points, they are completely unpolished in a refreshing way. Both critics give The Knux debut a Buy It rating.

JimGreg
Go to episode 155
RedemptionRedemption available on iTunes

Dawn Richard Redemption

Dawn Richard has flown largely under the radar for most of her career. Born and raised in New Orleans, Richard got her start in the Diddy-formed girl group Danity Kane in the early 2000s. She eventually became a solo artist, and her new record Redemption is the last in a trilogy of albums. Greg was really impressed by this record and Richard's ability to make meaningful and political electronic music. In addition to her smart lyrics, he commends her vocal ability and impact as a budding artist. Greg gives it a Buy It. Jim is in agreement, he thinks Richard's album shows the best side of thoughtful electronic music. Jim loves that Richard is finally getting to make the kind of music she wants, and gives Redemption a Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 578
Other People's LivesOther People's Lives available on iTunes

Ray Davies Other People's Lives

The first album up for review this week is Other People's Lives by former Kinks frontman Ray Davies. This is Davies‘ first solo album, and he seems to be returning to some of his original themes. Many of Davies’ previous songs, including Jim's recent DIJ pick, captured how it feels to be an outsider. Now, as a British rocker living in New Orleans, Davies is writing about those feelings again. The critics are split on their opinions of the album. Jim believes Davies' songwriting is as strong as ever and gives Other People's Lives a Buy It rating. Greg agrees, but doesn't think the sound of the record lives up to the lyrics. For him, it was Pro Tools run amuck and only a Burn It release.

JimGreg
Go to episode 12
dijs

Jim

“Gris Gris Gumbo Ya Ya”Dr. John

Jim returns to New Orleans for his Desert Island Jukebox selection this week. In addition, there's an element of psychedelic lunacy on his pick, as there is on Smile. The record is Dr. John's 1968 release Gris Gris, and the song is "Gris Gris Gumbo Ya Ya." You'll never hear anything like it.

Go to episode 314
news

Music News

It has been one year since Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast region. The music community has responded in a number of ways over the past 365 days. In fact, the response was quicker and more dramatic than that following the events of September 11, Jim and Greg note. The most high-profile Katrina project was the collaboration between Elvis Costello and Allen Toussaint. Toussaint is one of New Orleans‘ most noted producers and musicians, and, like many of the city’s citizens, he had to flee during the storm and has yet to be able to return. He and Costello wrote their album's title track, "The River in Reverse," just weeks after Katrina hit. Check out Jim and Greg's review of that album.

Other artists inspired by Hurricane Katrina include Paul Simon, Mos Def and Bruce Springsteen, who decided to add new hurricane-related lyrics to the song "How Can A Poor Man Stand Such Time and Live," during his live performances. Rapper Master P also just announced that he will be debuting a stage play, "Uncle Willy's Family," which he describes as a hip-hop gospel comedy play about Hurricane Katrina. It will star the rapper, as well as his son Lil Romeo, Silkk The Shockker, and Terry Miles. Now he can add playwright to his ever-expanding résumé. But the post-Katrina project that most moved Jim and Greg was the Dirty Dozen Brass Band's version of Marvin Gaye's 1971 concept album What's Going On. Gaye's songs were inspired by many of the country's problems at the time, including poverty, the environment, urban decay and race conflicts. It's interesting to see how applicable his words are today.

Go to episode 40

Music News

Go to episode 622

Music News

The digital music site eMusic has angered some listeners and labels in recent weeks. They moved from subscriptions to a tiered pricing model similar to iTunes that will include higher priced major label songs. After making this announcement, three of the biggest indie labels in the business decided to take their music elsewhere. Domino Records, Merge Records and the Beggars Group, which includes Matador, XL, Rough Trade and 4AD, have not elaborated on their decision to leave, but Jim and Greg suspect it's because of this new deal with major labels. In their statement, eMusic explained that this change was necessary for their long-term sustainability.

What's the best music town in the country? Some would say Chicago; some would say Seattle; but according to Songkick.com, it's Austin, Texas. Austin has always touted itself as the live music capital of the world, and now they've got this to back it up. In their survey of live shows per capita, Songkick also put Madison, New Orleans, Las Vegas and Denver in their Top 5. Some surprising winners, especially when you scan down to find that New York and L.A. didn‘t even make the cut. And it’s interesting to note that these cities had lower average ticket prices than bigger markets.

Go to episode 261

Music News

Move over Elvis, there's a new king in town and that king…is a cowboy. Garth Brooks once again surpassed Elvis Presley as the best-selling solo artist of all time in the U.S., selling 135 million units. Brooks is thoroughly beating his competition, as the number two country artist on the list is George Strait at only 69 million units. While Garth reigns supreme in the solo category, The Beatles are the best-selling music act with 178 million units.

In other news, Universal Music Group filed a lawsuit against two companies that distribute mixtapes to individuals in prisons claiming licensing infringement. The defendants argued that their efforts were to prevent contraband within prisons, however it looks like they could be spending more time fighting the law than their consumers.

The punk band Stereofire Empire found a missing painting in the New Orleans House of Blues that was worth $250,000. One member of the group was an art collector and recognized the stolen item. While they returned it (ala the Scooby Doo gang), the culprit is still at large. rodrigue

Go to episode 477