Results for OneRepublic

interviews

Ryan Tedder

Ryan Tedder Next, Jim and Greg chat with performer and songwriter Ryan Tedder. While Tedder is best known as the frontman of the pop rock band OneRepublic, he's also had an extremely successful career writing songs for other artists like Beyoncé, Adele and Taylor Swift. Tedder began a struggling songwriter in Nashville, but eventually producer Timbaland helped OneRepublic rise to popularity by remixing their song "Apologize" in 2007. Jim and Greg ask Tedder about how to write a great pop song and what it's like to work with Queen Bey. They also discuss the longevity of music today and whether the humanity in songwriting is lost.

Go to episode 561
news

Music News

In what is turning into a regular Sound Opinions segment:“The Recording Industry vs. The Consumer,”Jim and Greg turn this week to a news item coming out of Oregon. Earlier this year the RIAA filed a lawsuit accusing 17 unnamed suspected University of Oregon students of illegally sharing music. The suspects are identified only by an Internet address, and industry lawyers have demanded that the university identify them. Previously when the RIAA has done this, universities cooperated. But the University of Oregon's response has been quite remarkable. UO officials are refusing to identify the students without an investigation, saying that this would compromise their privacy and property rights. Oregon's Attorney General has backed the school and is accusing the RIAA of bullying. Jim and Greg speak to Tony Green, a reporter at the Oregonian, about what is fast becoming a contentious battle.

While they may not be effective, the record industry lawsuits are an attempt to maintain ground in an ever-changing landscape. The next two stories speak to this music industry flux. Universal, the top music label, has ordered its artists to take full tracks off of their MySpace pages. While MySpace was once viewed as a great promotional tool, it's now been added to the list of digital distribution enemies. Therefore, commercial successes like Colbie Caillat are having to remove content from their sites and explain the issue to hungry fans. This move might have been a response to losses Universal experienced last quarter. They're also laying off a number of top and mid-level executives, and Vivendi, the company that owns the label, has announced plans to acquire video game publisher Activision. Activision produces Guitar Hero, the game that has proven to be more successful than any music release this year.

Another area the music industry is struggling with is commercial radio. With an increasing number of alternatives to radio including internet radio and the iPod, broadcast radio listenership has been gradually diminishing over the past few years. In an effort to maintain listeners, program directors are actually choosing to play fewer songs, more times. New York Times reporter Jeff Leeds explains that commercial radio stations are oddly choosing to keep the listeners they've got, rather than get new ones. The most recent example of this strategy is the tremendous amount of airpla{artist: y given to OneRepublic's hit single "Apologize." The Timbaland} produced track recently broke the record for the most plays of a song on the nation's Top 40 stations in a single week. It was played almost 11,000 times in one single week and was heard by more than 70 million listeners.

Go to episode 106

Music News

What if you could predict a hit? It's a music industry dream (or nightmare depending on how you look at it.) New research from Emory University suggests that the answers might lie in our brains. Dr. Gregory Berns and his team have discovered that teens have tell-tale brain responses when listening to hit songs, and that could help predict a song's commercial success. He explains to Jim and Greg that the discovery was an accident. After conducting MRI studies on teens listening to MySpace music, he noted that one of the tracks, One Republic's "Apologize" became an American Idol hit years later. Strong activity in two brain regions could predict hits about 1/3 of the time. Weak activity was even better at predicting non-hits. And brain responses in those regions were better predictors of song success than whether the participants said they liked or disliked any given song. Jim and Greg aren't teens, but wonder if their work could be made easier with MRI technology.

Go to episode 296