Results for The Cars

specials

MTV's Silver Anniversary

MTV turns 25 this week. To celebrate (or perhaps mourn), Jim and Greg discuss the station's impact on the music industry. To kick off the dissection, Sound Opinions surveys the opinions of festivalgoers at Chicago's Pitchfork Music Festival.

Go to episode 36
reviews
Move Like ThisMove Like This available on iTunes

The Cars Move Like This

This next review should take you back. '80s hit makers The Cars have a new album out called Move Like This. It's their first in nearly three decades. Jim describes the band as successful synthesists-they took avant garde ideas and paired them with tuneful pop sensibilities. It made arty sounds safe on classic rock radio. But he thinks a little of lead singer Ric Ocasek goes a long way. He misses the balance of bassist/vocalist Ben Orr who died in 2000. Jim also wishes they had pushed the sound to someplace new. Of Move Like This, he says Trash It. Greg never thought The Cars made great albums, just great singles. And there are a handful of uptempo winners here, so he says Burn It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 285
dijs

Jim

“She Cracked”Jonathan Richman and the Modern Lovers

The opportunity to play Desert Island DJ goes to Jim this week. Inspired by his discussion with Eddie Argos from Art Brut, Jim chooses a song by Jonathan Richman and the Modern Lovers to add to the Desert Island Jukebox. The Modern Lovers, who were hugely influenced by the Velvet Underground, would all go on to be a part of great projects: David Robinson started drumming for The Cars, Jerry Harrison played keyboards with Talking Heads, and Ernie Brooks went on to play with a number of bands, including Rhys Chatham's guitar army (discussed a few weeks ago). Richman took some bizarre turns, promising to only play music fit for a baby's ear, but the band's 1976 self-titled debut remains a masterpiece, according to Jim. He understands why Argos was so inspired by Richman's songwriting. Both men salute the“everyman dweeb”who struggles with getting girls and respect. While "Roadrunner" is perhaps the band's best known song, Jim decides to go with "She Cracked" as this week's DIJ pick.

Go to episode 24
lists

Sophomore Success

They say that it takes a lifetime to make your first record and only a few months to make your second. If that's true, then it's no surprise that most artists face the dreaded“sophomore slump.”But, a rare few second albums meet or even exceed the first effort. Here are Jim & Greg's picks for Sophomore Success Stories:

Go to episode 252
features

New Wave

No one of a certain age can hear "Rio" without picturing Simon LeBon and the members of Duran Duran crooning off the side of a yacht. They were the“Rolling Stones of the New Wave era”according to writer Lori Majewski, and through such videos represented everything you either love or hate about the 1980's—the excess, the sex, the fashion and the pure pop production. But, while this was a very visual era of music (with infamous clothes and even more infamous hair), there's a lot to be said for the sound. Jim and Greg talk to Lori about her new book Mad World: An Oral History of New Wave Artists and the Songs That Defined the 1980's, co-written with Jonathan Bernstein. In it, the authors reveal why New Wave caught on so strongly with pop fans and the media, especially post-punk in the U.K. (Certainly the NME would rather photograph Adam Ant than a spitting Johnny Rotten). And Jim and Greg reveal their own affection for music by Boy George, The Cars, A Flock of Seagulls and most anything brought to the big screen by John Hughes.

Here are other New Wave acts we fondly remember:

  • Duran Duran
  • Gary Numan
  • Spandau Ballet
  • Adam Ant
  • Yaz
  • Human League
  • A-Ha
  • Kajagoogoo
  • Tears for Fears
  • OMD
  • Psychedelic Furs
  • Simple Minds
  • Culture Club
  • A Flock of Seagulls
  • New Order

And check out Lori Majewski's favorite New Wave Videos and follow us on Beats Music for a full playlist.

Go to episode 456
news

Music News

This episode of Sound Opinions starts out with a discussion of the recent phenomenon overtaking many rock groups: Bands like The Doors, Queen, Journey, and The Cars are touring and making albums despite the fact that their original lead singers are no longer with them. This is not a new phenomenon, however. Jim and Greg have both seen this before with The Four Tops, The Platters, and more recently, Judas Priest, whose story inspired the movie Rock Star.

One of the most heavily publicized instances of a band replacing its lead singer is with the group INXS. In order to cast another Michael Hutchence, INXS's original lead singer who committed suicide in 1997, the Australian bandmates went so far as to utilize reality television. In Rock Star INXS, hundreds of wannabes vied for this slot. The winner was JD Roth, whose single with INXS is currently getting a fair amount of radio play. The runner-up is Chicago musician Marty Casey. To get to the bottom of the substitute lead-singer phenomenon, Jim and Greg sit down with Casey, whose band The Lovehammers is opening up for Roth and INXS on their current tour.

Go to episode 7