Results for The Kingsmen

dijs

Greg

“Louie, Go Home”The Who,Joan Jett,David Bowie,The Kingsmen,Paul Revere and the Raiders

Idaho-native Paul Revere of the 1960's colonial-garbed band Paul Revere and the Raiders passed away this week from cancer, so Greg chooses to remember the ringleader of the raucous band by taking their song "Louie, Go Home" with him to the Desert Island Jukebox. The 1964 single is a response to The Kingsmen's 1963 song "Louie Louie"—one they put together after relocating from Idaho to Kingsmen territory in the Pacific Northwest. The tongue-in-cheek track would later go on to be recorded by David Bowie (still known then as David Jones), The Who, Joan Jett and more.

Go to episode 463
lists

Best Cover Songs

In the age of karaoke and“American Idol,”it's easy to forget how great a cover song can be. But, as Jim and Greg discuss, an artist's interpretation of someone else's song can often be better than the original. In those cases, the performer brings passion and a new spin to a song. During the course of the show, Jim and Greg run down their picks for best cover songs. (For an even longer list of noteworthy cover songs, go to the thread on the Sound Opinions Message Board.)

Go to episode 79
news

Music News

Sad news: singer Ben E. King has died at age 76 in New Jersey. After being discovered in a luncheonette in 1956, King scored a string of hit singles as a member of The Drifters and then as a solo artist. With the unique blend of grit and smoothness in his voice, King bridged the gap between the doo-wop and soul eras – he's the rare artist who's charted in four different decades. He'll forever be remembered for his 1961 solo hit "Stand By Me," but Greg also loves his moving performance with The Drifters on the Doc Pomus-penned "Save the Last Dance For Me."

Last month we also lost Jack Ely of the Portland garage band The Kingsmen, who sang lead on their immortal 1963 cover of Richard Berry's "Louie Louie." Rumors spread that Ely's indecipherable singing might be covering up dirty lyrics, outraging then-Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy and even prompting an FBI investigation. The more prosaic truth may have been that Ely's singing was slurred because his braces had just been tightened. While Ely may not be a household name, without those three chords, there would be no punk rock as we know it.

Go to episode 493

Music News

So you think you know how kids are consuming music these days? Think again. Media information company Nielsen just released a report that debunks many of the myths surrounding kids and music, the biggest of which is that they just don't buy it anymore. Teens, it turns out, consume more music than any other age group. And though YouTube has edged out radio as their primary means of discovering new music, over a third of teens bought an old-fashioned CD in the past year. What's most surprising? Only 17 percent of teens say they download music illegally.

The Juggalos are fighting back! Last year the FBI placed the Juggalos - superfans of Detroit's horrorcore rap duo Insane Clown Posse - on its National Gang Threat Assessment list. At last weekend's gathering of the Juggalos, Violent J and Shaggy 2 Dopeannounced they weren‘t taking the gang label (or accusations of petty theft and violence) lying down. They’ve set up a website, juggalosfightback.com, where fans can submit complaints of discrimination based on their“gang”affiliation in preparation for what could be a class action lawsuit against the FBI. The incident reminds Jim of the FBI's similarly misguided“investigation”into the content of The Kingsmen's 1957 hit "Louie Louie." He thinks maybe it's time the Feds turned off their radios and retired from cultural criticism.

Go to episode 351