Results for Yo La Tengo

reviews
Stuff Like That ThereStuff Like That There available on iTunes

Yo La Tengo Stuff Like That There

Yo La Tengo's live sets are famed for including covers of obscurities from the rock canon. Their 1990 album Fakebook was filled with surprising unplugged covers alongside acoustic reinterpretations of songs from the band's own catalog. Now on their fourteenth LP Stuff Like That There, the indie veterans are revisiting that concept. Greg admires the group's mission to direct listeners' attentions to neglected records they revere, both deep cuts from the distant past as well as songs by their underrated peers. But Greg wishes there was more variety in the hushed sound, so he gives the album a Try It. Jim has always loved the acoustic side of YLT since the band formed in his hometown of Hoboken, New Jersey. Jim finds the interplay of Georgia Hubley and Ira Kaplan's vocals to be lovely and is happy to see the return of guitarist Dave Schramm. It may be a surprise for fans of the noisier Yo La Tengo, but for Jim, Stuff Like That There is a Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 510
I Am Not Afraid of You and I Will Beat Your AssI Am Not Afraid of You and I Will Beat Your Ass available on iTunes

Yo La Tengo I Am Not Afraid of You and I Will Beat Your Ass

The second album up for review this week is by Hoboken's own Yo La Tengo. I Am Not Afraid of You and I Will Beat Your Ass is Yo La Tengo's 13th album since husband and wife team Ira Kaplan and Georgia Hubley started the band in 1984. Their name comes from the cry of "I've got it!" that Mets infielder Elio Chacon would utter in his native tongue. Kaplan is a former rock critic himself, and his eclectic musical tastes are apparent in the music. According to Jim, the band is the epitome of good taste. He describes I Am Not Afraid of You… as a stylistic hodgepodge, but thinks each one of the 15 tracks is a winner. Greg agrees. The band was experimenting with being more subdued in the past few years, and he's glad they've returned to form with tons of genre-jumping on this album. It appears we have another double Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 43
FadeFade available on iTunes

Yo La Tengo Fade

Indie veterans Yo La Tengo started making their version of the Velvet Underground's droning guitar rock in 1984. Jim and Greg have been listening ever since. (Jim - our own“Son of Jersey”- even caught the band's first show at Maxwell's in Hoboken). Over 13 albums, Jim says, Yo La's established itself as a band of impeccable taste. Greg admits their last few contemplative mood records have sounded a bit“samey.”Do they shake things up on the latest release, Fade? Both Greg and Jim say“yes.”The strings and "John Fahey-esque" acoustic guitar are pleasant surprises. As Greg notes, Ira Kaplan and Georgia Hubley's ruminations on their decades-long relationship give Fade a cohesive feel. It gets a double Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 373
They Want My SoulThey Want My Soul available on iTunes

Spoon They Want My Soul

Next to Yo La Tengo there isn't a longer-running, more reliable indie rock band in business today than Spoon. This year marks twenty years and eight albums for the band, which has had success on both independent and major labels, thanks to a signature sound that only seems to get tighter with each outing. Spoon's latest, They Want My Soul comes four years after the group's previous release and features the same economical and emotional music fans and critics have come to love, but with a subtle twist that Greg feels makes this album more fragile and beautiful than past records. Jim agrees… They Want My Soul is now his second most favorite Spoon album after 2007's Ga Ga Ga Ga Ga, and he's quick to point out this new album also makes a great dance record thanks to the rhythmic contributions of drummer Jim Eno. Eno's grooves opposite frontman Britt Daniel's vocals have always been the band's secret sauce, and it's still as good as ever. Both critics say They Want My Soul is a Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 454
dijs

Jim

“Jane September”Red Buckets

Jim was saddened by the loss last week of Michael Carlucci, a guitarist and fixture of the 1980s Hoboken, New Jersey scene where Jim cut his teeth. Carlucci was best known for leading his own band Winter Hours, but was also a member of Red Buckets, playing behind singer/songwriter Richard Mason. Red Buckets was beloved in Hoboken – Yo La Tengo has recorded two tribute songs to the band – but never achieved national success. In memory of Michael Carlucci, Jim nominates "Jane September" by Red Buckets to the Desert Island Jukebox.

Go to episode 519
lists

The Best Albums of 2015

Go to episode 524

Summer Songs (Part 2)

Back in 2006, Greg and Jim put out a playlist of their favorite summer songs. Now they give you the long-awaited part 2 of their hot summer mixtape.

Go to episode 502
news

Music News

(Unfortunately) the music news is often focused on a death in the industry. This week it's the death of a club. Maxwell's in Hoboken, NJ will be closing its doors next month. This is the famous bar where Nirvana performed, Bruce Springsteen shot the video for "Glory Days," and Yo La Tengo celebrated Chanukah. This is also the place where a young Jim DeRogatis came of musical age. Read his tribute here. And check out our own live recording at Maxwell's with The Feelies.

Jim and Greg also say farewell to Marvin Junior who sang tenor in the Chicago R&B group The Dells. As Greg explains, the original members performed together for six decades, something many groups from that era weren‘t able to do. Perhaps that’s why Robert Townsend captured their story in The Five Heartbeats.

Go to episode 393