Results for Britpop

classic album dissections
Sea

Roxy Music Roxy Music

This week, Jim and Greg tackle Roxy Music's 1972 self-titled debut album. Fronted by songwriter and vocalist Bryan Ferry, the English glam rock band combined the talents of bassist Graham Simpson, multi-reedist Andy Mackay, synth player Brian Eno, drummer Paul Thompson, and guitarist Phil Manzanera. Phil joined Jim and Greg to talk about Roxy's early years.

Reaping from sources as varied as avant-garde electronic composition, jazz, Berlin cabaret, glam rock, and American crooners, Roxy's hyper-eclectic style“didn't sound like anything else”in popular music in 1972, according to Greg. Ferry has cited the work of his mentor, pop collage artist Richard Hamilton, as an inspiration for his own catch-all musical aesthetic. As Greg observes, Roxy Music marked a new era in which "rock was a wide-open playing field, and you could do anything with it."

Critics took notice - the record was well-received upon its release and is frequently included on Best Album lists. Though the group went its separate ways in 1983, Roxy Music profoundly influenced musical genres to come, from post-punk and the New Romantic movement to Britpop—and it can all be traced back to the group's delightfully wacky debut album.

Go to episode 663
reviews
Everyday Robots (Special Edition)Everyday Robots available on iTunes

Damon Albarn Everyday Robots

Since founding the Britpop group Blur, frontman Damon Albarn has bounced from project to project – writing and singing for Gorillaz, collaborating with African artists on Mali Music, and even composing an opera called Dr Dee. But only now, at age 46, has Albarn finally released a solo album. Everyday Robots is a deeply personal debut, with Albarn boldly exploring his dark past, existential crises and struggles with heroin. But the constant brooding is too much for Greg. He insists that Albarn's work with Gorillaz was just as personal, yet more upbeat, and with hooks you could dig into. Robots, on the other hand, is a Trash It. Jim couldn't disagree more. He considers the album a masterpiece, with Albarn baring his soul over“heartbeat percussion”and stripped-down instrumentals, and would absolutely Buy It.

JimGreg
Go to episode 440
dijs

Jim

“Vaseline”Elastica

Jim was in a Britpop mood when he chose this week's Desert Island Jukebox song. When you think Blur you think Damon Albarn, and when you think Damon Albarn, you might go back to his former lady love Justine Frischmann of Elastica. Incidentally, M.I.A. also ran in circles with Frischmann, and they collaborated on some of her early songs. Elastica broke up by 2001, but before that they released a slew of great pop-rock hits, including "Vaseline."

Go to episode 243

Greg

“I Don't Know Why I Love You”The House of Love

A band Greg highlighted earlier in the show, The Soft Science, released a cover of The House of Love's 1989 single "I Don't Know Why I Love You" as a B-side in April. For this spin on the Desert Island Jukebox, Greg's playing the original. He says that The House of Love was a victim of bad timing, coming after The Smiths, but before the Britpop boom. The song "I Don't Know Why I Love You" came on their second self-titled album. That session was their first for a major label and took more than two years and four producers to complete. Band members said new pressure to create hits caused tension within the band. The album's first single and some remixes were released against the band's will, adding to the trouble. Eventually guitarist Terry Bickers was kicked out of the band just a few days into the album's promotional tour. Still, Greg says the album is full of singles that hold up, even almost 30 years later. He points out similarities in the sound of Ride and The Stone Roses as evidence of The House of Love's influence.

Go to episode 659