interviews 2019

run

Geoff Edgers

By the mid 1980s, Aerosmith was far from their 1970s heights. Run-DMC, which consisted of rappers Joseph (Run) Simmons and Darryl (DMC) McDaniels, as well as Jammaster J, was a young rap group with two solid selling albums under their belt. But, like nearly all of the hip hop acts of the early '80s, they had yet to cross over into the mainstream.

Run-DMC and Aerosmith… two groups that couldn't be further apart musically, came together in 1986 to record“Walk This Way.”The refreshed track ended up being a surprising hit for both bands. Jim and Greg talk with author Geoff Edgers who writes about this collaboration in his new book Walk This Way: Run-DMC, Aerosmith, and the Song that Changed American Music Forever. The book gives the inside story of that collaboration and its lasting influence.

Go to episode 689
BT

The O‘My’s

Recently, Jim and Greg sat down with a band that Greg highlighted as a Buried Treasure last year: The O‘My’s. The genre-bending soul duo have become a fixture in Chicago's music scene, collaborating with rappers like Chance The Rapper, Saba, and Vic Mensa. They've also worked with producer and horn player Nico Segal, who previously recorded as Donnie Trumpet. The group started out stylistically indebted to their soul predecessors (down to wearing suits on stage); but with their latest album, 2018's Tomorrow, their sound has developed into something thoroughly modern. The O‘My’s, made up of singer/guitarist Maceo Haymes and keyboardist Nick Hennessey, joined us for a stripped down performance and conversation at the Goose Island Tap Room.

Go to episode 687
Klaus

Klaus Voorman

Klaus Voormann was an artist living in Hamburg when he followed the sound of live music down into a cellar one night and happened upon his first live rock and roll show. He saw two acts from Liverpool that night: Rory Storm and the Hurricanes (with Ringo Starr on drums) and an irreverent dance band called The Beatles.

The friendship he struck up with The Beatles would alter the course of his life and prove to be lifelong. When they leapt forward into psychedelia with Revolver, they turned to Voormann to create a fitting cover image. That work won a Grammy and a place of honor (in tattoo form) on Jim's arm. When John Lennon started pulling away from The Beatles, he enlisted Voormann to play bass in the Plastic Ono Band. George Harrison and Starr followed suit, trusting their "A Hard Day's Night" era roommate, Voormann, to provide the bassline on many of their solo albums as well.

His stature as a session bass player grew throughout the 1970's- he can be heard on albums by Carly Simon, Harry Nilsson and Lou Reed among many others. In the early 1980s Voormann added“producer”to his resume through his work with the German band, Trio.

Go to episode 686
Broken Record hosts Rick Rubin, Bruce Headlam and Malcolm Gladwell

Malcolm Gladwell & Bruce Headlam

Bestselling author and New Yorker staff writer Malcolm Gladwell turned his energy to podcasting in 2016 with the show Revisionist History. Now he's launched his second podcast, this one devoted to music called Broken Record. It's a collaboration with legendary music producer Rick Rubin and Gladwell's childhood friend and former New York Times editor, Bruce Headlam. Headlam and Gladwell joined Jim for a discussion about how they bonded over music, their take on the role of the critic in the digital age and the relative artistic merit of YES solo projects.

Go to episode 684